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Posts Tagged ‘civil engineering’

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world

Monash University has ranked 41 in the world in Civil Engineering, and placed in the top 100 and 200 universities across five further categories, according to the latest Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU).

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world (Photo credit: Monash University)

Monash ranked in the top 100 universities for Chemical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Materials Engineering, and placed in the top 200 for Energy Science Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

Monash Provost and Senior Vice-President Professor Edwina Cornish commended staff and graduates on the latest world rankings.

“This outstanding result is a reflection of Monash Engineering’s world leading research which is focused on bringing real benefits to Australia into the future.”

ARWU ranks more than 1200 tertiary institutions each year and the best 500 are published.

Monash Engineering School

Did you know that Monash Engineering School offers the widest choice of engineering courses than any other Australian university?

Monash Engineering School offers a Master of Advanced Engineering, which commenced in 2015. Delivered at the Clayton campus, the Master of Advanced Engineering offers flexibility to complete your master degree in just one or two years depending on your previous study and work experience.

Specialisation options

  1. Chemical engineering
  2. Civil engineering (Water)
  3. Civil engineering (Transport)
  4. Civil engineering (Infrastructure Systems)
  5. Electrical engineering
  6. Energy and Sustainability (Malaysia campus only)
  7. Materials engineering
  8. Mechanical engineering

Apply to Monash Engineering School!

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Learn more about engineering degrees at Monash. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Sydney Engineering researchers study recycling to benefit agriculture

Urine could be successfully recycled to fertilise crops according to University of Sydney civil engineering researchers who have examined the effectiveness of reusing nutrients from the human waste.

University of Sydney Engineering School

Find out more about civil engineering at Sydney

Dr Federico Maggi, senior lecturer in the Sydney School of Civil Engineering and expert in environmental modelling says there is growing evidence that the use of human urine in agriculture is completely viable.

“Our preliminary results indicate that human urine can be effectively used extensively in agriculture to reduce the production and use of mineral commercial fertilisers.

“It contains the highest levels of nutrients among all the human excreta and yields considerable amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. These are the most essential nutrients for the growth of plants, and substantially all micronutrients plants need for healthy growth,” the Sydney Engineering lecturer explained.

The researchers believe the model they have developed could be used to increase the effectiveness of urine fertilisation as well as crop yield, substantially lowering costs in terms of supplied nutrient.

Fiona Tang Ph.D. candidate, who studied the use of urine during her Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree, explains: “In human urine we have complex compounds that can be broken down into simpler molecules that plants and crops actually want to take up as their food source. Soybean, cabbage, cauliflower for example flourish with it.”

As part of her undergraduate studies Fiona conducted a survey investigating attitudes towards the use of human urine as a substitution to mineral fertiliser. She found there was a high acceptance level to its application in agriculture.

“Human waste has been used as organic fertiliser since ancient times. Its use in agriculture is still commonly practiced in many areas around the world, including parts of Southeast Asia and Africa,” Fiona says.

“Over seventy percent of the respondents in the survey were very positive towards the idea of applying human urine in agriculture and were willing to buy and consume crops grown by urine-based fertiliser,” she says.

Fiona says that unless we find alternatives to phosphorus or a similar mineral the world will potentially run out of these natural resources.

“Extensive reliance on mineral fertilizer is consuming copious amounts of fossil energy and mineral resources. Phosphorus, especially, is depleting and some studies have revealed the reserves of phosphate rock that are economically exploitable will only last for about a hundred years at current extraction rates. Recycling nutrients from human urine is a promising solution to the depletion of mineral resources,” Fiona said.

Taking the concept forward the researchers say it would be possible to design a toilet system that separates human waste at the point of deposit.

“Years ago society baulked at the idea of separating their household waste into recyclable and non-recyclable bins, now in Australia it is second nature,” states Dr Maggi.

University of Sydney School of Civil Engineering

The Sydney School of Civil Engineering offers students a well-rounded understanding of the discipline, combined with the much sought-after design, research and problem-solving skills needed to help create and manage sustainable built and natural environments.

Civil engineering is behind many aspects of everyday life we take for granted. It incorporates the intricate behind-the-scenes planning and design, and the construction, maintenance and all-important recycling of community facilities and infrastructures all over the world. It’s why our high-rise buildings, roads, bridges, railways, power stations, airports, dams and harbours are safe, efficient and easy to use.

The University of Sydney is the top ranked Australian university and 15th in the world for civil engineering and their leadership is reflected in the outcomes of teaching and research, and leading alumni.

Master of Engineering (Civil Engineering)

A postgraduate specialisation in civil engineering will teach you about planning, designing and testing structures within the built environment. It is concerned with all types of infrastructures including dams, bridges, pipelines, roads, towers and buildings. You may engage in areas of study including steel/concrete structures, environmental geotechnics, advanced water resources management and numerical methods in engineering.

Program: Master of Engineering (Civil Engineering)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: March and July
Application deadline: January 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake; however, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply a minimum of three months in advance of the program start date.

Apply to the Sydney Engineering School!

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Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying civil engineering or agriculture at the University of Sydney Engineering School. Email OzTREKK Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 to find out how you can study in Australia.

Monday, March 10th, 2014

University of Newcastle Civil Engineering in world’s top 50

The University of Newcastle‘s Civil and Structural Engineering discipline has entered the world’s Top 50 in the most recent QS World University Rankings by Subject list increasing its ranking by 14 places up to 45th in the world.

Published by QS, the University of Newcastle has been ranked in the world’s top 100 universities for three subjects and in the top 200 universities for a further nine subjects.

The university’s Geography discipline ranked in the top 100 for the second year in a row, and Linguistics, which entered the QS World subject rankings last year, moved into the top 100 in 2014.

The University of Newcastle‘s other Engineering subjects, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, each ranked in the world’s top 200. The Environmental Sciences program debuted on the Top 200 list this year.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Caroline McMillen, said UON‘s excellent performance in the 2014 QS subject rankings built on the university’s growing global reputation for excellence in education, and research and innovation.

UON consistently ranks in the top three percent of universities in the world and in the top ten universities in Australia for research intensity. The latest QS subject rankings recognize the achievements of our staff who work hard across a range of disciplines to engage as global leaders who drive world-class innovation in our community and region,” she said.

The QS rankings were announced on the heels of an Australian Bureau of Statistics report, which found Australians with university-level qualifications in science, technology, engineering and maths had the best career outlook nationwide.

“Through our Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, which was rated by the Excellence in Research for Australia assessment exercise as one of the top five in the country, UON is delivering quality graduates and research and innovation  which contribute to Australia’s skills and productivity and to the economic transition of our region,” said Professor McMillen.

About the University of Newcastle School of Engineering

The School of Engineering is dedicated to research and training in the disciplines of Chemical, Civil, Environmental, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, and Surveying. The engineering school’s programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, the school received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy and Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

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Learn more about studying engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about engineering programs and about how you can study in Australia.

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Newcastle civil engineer named New Face of Civil Engineering

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) has named University of Newcastle research academic Dr James Hambleton as one of 10 New Faces of Civil Engineering.

University of Newcastle Engineering School

Study engineering at the University of  Newcastle

The New Faces program promotes the achievement of young civil engineers by highlighting their contributions to and impact on society.

Thirty-year-old Dr Hambleton, a research associate at the ARC Centre for Excellence in Geotechnical Science and Engineering, will be recognized for this honour at ASCE’s annual Outstanding Projects and Leaders (OPAL) Gala on March 20, 2014, in Arlington, Virginia.

His research has focused on the advancement of computational, analytical and experimental techniques in geomechanics. Applications of this research include the enhancement of field tests for identifying soil strength and the development of predication and mitigation techniques for land damage caused by off-road vehicles.

His findings have been shared in more than 25 publications and conference presentations. These efforts earned Dr Hambleton several awards, including the Neville GW Cook Award for Innovative Research in Geomechanics. He also serves as a reviewer on more than 10 international journals.

Civil engineering requires a wonderful combination of intuition and deduction. I can get my hands dirty while theorizing about the possibilities for getting my hands dirty,” the University of Newcastle researcher said.

Originally from Wisconsin, Dr Hambleton earned his bachelor, master and doctoral degrees from the University of Minnesota.

Dr Hambleton has been at the University of Newcastle since 2010 and currently teaches first year and final year civil engineering students. His first-year course curriculum focuses on introducing students to the many disciplines of civil engineering and engaging students in design projects. He also serves as principal supervisor for two PhD students, and co-supervises two others.

Founded in 1852, the American Society of Civil Engineers represents more than 145,000 civil engineers worldwide and is America’s oldest national engineering society.

University of Newcastle School of Engineering

The School of Engineering is dedicated to research and training in the disciplines of Chemical, Civil, Environmental, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, and Surveying.

The engineering school‘s programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, the school received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy and Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

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Learn more about studying engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about engineering programs and about how you can study in Australia.

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

UQ School of Civil Engineering helps minimize environmental impacts in the Solomon Islands

The University of Queensland has joined industry partners in a program designed to help ensure a major mining project takes account of the needs of Solomon Islands communities and the environment.

The partnership between UQ’s School of Civil Engineering, international consulting firm Golder Associates Pty Ltd and global group Sumitomo Metal Mining will undertake an environmental and social impact assessment of a proposed large-scale nickel mine in the Solomon Islands.

Lead researcher and School of Civil Engineering academic Dr Simon Albert said the mining project had the potential to provide significant benefits to the economy of the Solomon Islands, but it was essential that diverse social and environmental values were maintained.

“Given the local communities rely on marine and terrestrial resources for food, transport, medicine and shelter, it is critical to minimize the impact of the project on the local environment through the implementation of sustainable practices,” Dr Albert said.

He said the Solomon Islands had limited development opportunities to support the government in providing essential services to the mostly rural communities.

“The few resource extraction activities that do exist often come at a high environmental cost due to limited environmental regulations and small companies with limited experience,” the engineering academic said.

The Sumitomo Solomon Islands Nickel Project brings together Sumitomo’s 400-year history in mining, Golder’s global experience in environmental and social impact assessments and UQ’s world-class research capacity.

Dr Albert said this would ensure the mining project was well placed to minimize environmental impacts through the implementation of sustainable practices.

The UQ research team consists of Dr Albert, Dr Alistair Grinham and Dr Badin Gibbes, who have expertise in research on the environment, water resources and hydrology.

Dr Grinham said it was essential that marine water quality was monitored throughout the process to ensure international guidelines were met.

“This project provides a rare chance to collect high-precision data from the top of the catchment, freshwater streams, estuaries, coral reef lagoons, and down to deep sea that we can use to guide numerical models,” Dr Grinham said.

The School of Civil Engineering Head Professor José Torero said the project recognized the engineering school’s reputation in producing high-quality research.

“This phase of the project is worth approximately one million dollars, providing significant research experience to the school and the university,” Professor Torero said and added that these types of partnerships raise the UQ School of Civil Engineering’s profile in the water and mining industry, which can lead to further opportunities within these sectors.

About the UQ School of Civil Engineering

The School of Civil Engineering at the University of Queensland is renowned for civil engineering teaching and research in water, environmental, geotechnical, structural and transportation engineering.

Graduates of the engineering school school can be found all over the world, working at all levels of government and industry. UQ alumni are taking leading roles in helping to build cleaner and sustainable industries, provide waste and pollution control and guide improved resource management.

With the job market yielding many opportunities both nationally and internationally, it’s an exciting time to be a civil engineer. Studying at UQ’s School of Civil Engineering prepares students for a successful career in a field that is expanding and evolving along with the world in which we live.

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Learn more about studying engineering at the University of Queensland and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK for more information about Australian Engineering Schools and about how you can study in Australia. Call toll free 1 866-698-7355 or email info@oztrekk.com.