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Posts Tagged ‘Bachelor of Nursing’

Thursday, August 24th, 2017

5 tips for surviving nursing school from a current nursing student

So, nursing, eh? Be prepared to be run off your feet! But you already know this, and you also know the rewards of choosing such an incredibly worthwhile career!

5 tips for surviving nursing school

Maggie is in her final year of nursing

OzTREKK’s summer Admissions Coordinator, Maggie, is also a nursing student during the rest of the year. Here, Maggie offers some helpful tips for surviving nursing school!

1. Get a day planner, or use your phone as a planner. As a nursing student myself, this is the most helpful thing ever. In nursing school your schedule gets pretty crazy. This one is really great.

2. Be confident in yourself, and take charge. It is really hard to learn new skills in nursing if you don’t actually do them, so make sure you jump at any chance to do something you haven’t done before, whether it is in lab or in placement (even if it is something that you don’t want to do, or might think is gross…).

3. Get a good pair of shoes for placement. Don’t be afraid to splurge for them, because it will seriously save you, both short and long term. These ones are a pretty good choice. Plus, they are rubber, which makes it easy to remove anything that may get on your shoes (ew).

4. Don’t be afraid to ask questions! How can you learn if you don’t ask?

5. Keep an open mind, and a positive outlook. I went into nursing thinking I wanted to work in pediatrics, and that I would never want to work in geriatrics. But it turns out that I really love working with the geriatric population. If you limit yourself to one field, you might miss out on other opportunities. If you get a placement that you weren’t really hoping for, make the best of it, because you may end up actually loving it.

Studying nursing at an Australian university

Canadian and Australian nursing programs at the university level are similar. To become a registered nurse, you need to complete a Bachelor of Nursing degree, or, alternatively, you can undertake a general undergraduate degree and then progress into a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Nursing degree.

Each Australian nursing program varies in its offering, but they all include clinical placements and are accredited in their respective Australian states.

The following OzTREKK Australian universities offer undergraduate nursing degrees:

James Cook University Nursing School
Monash University Nursing School 
University of Newcastle Nursing School
University of Queensland Nursing School 
University of Sydney Nursing School

The following OzTREKK Australian universities offer graduate-entry nursing degrees:

Monash University Nursing School
University of Melbourne Nursing School 
University of Queensland Nursing School 
University of Sydney Nursing School

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For more information about studying nursing in Australia, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com.

Monday, July 17th, 2017

5 inside tips about studying nursing at the University of Sydney

First-year Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) student Mackenzie O’Toole agreed to answer 15 questions about studying nursing at the University of Sydney, including why she chose it, what she likes about it, and what surprised her most about university life.

5 reasons to study nursing at the University of Sydney

University of Sydney Nursing School

Here, Mackenzie discusses the five things she enjoys about studying nursing at the University of Sydney. To check out the full list, watch the video below, “15 questions with nursing student Mackenzie O’Toole.”

1. Where is the best spot at Sydney Nursing School?

Mackenzie’s favourite spot at Sydney Nursing School are the clinical simulation labs (SIM labs). The SIM labs are home to full-body manikins installed with the latest simulation technology. They provide a safe environment where students like Mackenzie can practice and improve their clinical skills while developing their confidence in the procedures they are learning in lectures.

Through simulated learning, students become proficient at

  • taking blood pressure
  • checking a pulse
  • listening to breath
  • heart and bowel sounds
  • dressing wounds
  • preparing and administering medications
  • conducting interviews, and
  • documenting patient information.

2. Why she chose a nursing degree

When asked why she chose a nursing degree, Mackenzie’s main reason was “to help others in need.” Nurses make a genuine difference to people’s lives. Mackenzie was also inspired by the nursing care she received when she contracted meningitis at just three months of age, an event that left her with hearing loss in one ear. Her passion for helping others grew from that point on. She wanted to treat others with the same care she had received.

3. How quickly she was able to undertake a placement

Mackenzie was amazed by how soon into her degree she was able to gain real-world experience in her placement. She was placed at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, which is located only blocks away from the university campus.

From the first year of the Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) degree, students gain invaluable practical experience through 880 hours of clinical placements across a wide variety of healthcare settings including emergency departments, intensive care units, paediatric units, mental health facilities and community health centres. Students also have the opportunity to undertake a clinical placement overseas.

4. How supportive her lecturers have been

Sydney Nursing School offers students a supportive environment in which to learn. They are taught by leading academics, clinicians and researchers who are part of the nursing and healthcare community. Mackenzie found her lecturers to be “amazingly supportive.”

Helping students from day one through to graduation, the University of Sydney has a network of services, facilities and experts to make university experience as smooth and rewarding as possible.

5. How much she loves working with different people

As highly trained and valued professionals, nurses work with a diverse range of people, including other healthcare professionals and patients from all walks of life. Mackenzie has loved how she has been able to study and work alongside people from a diverse range of backgrounds from around Australia and the world.

Students learn how to thrive in complex health environments and will build an understanding of how to work with other health professionals to provide the highest quality patient-centered care.

Study Nursing at the University of Sydney

Sydney Nursing School has been ranked number one in Australia for research and educational excellence in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject. Currently, the University of Sydney is ranked 9th in the world for nursing, according the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

Program: Master of Nursing 
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Intake: March 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: International applications are managed in rounds: Round 1 – May 25, 2017; Round 2 – August 17, 2017; Round 3 – October 6 2017

Apply to the University of Sydney Nursing School!

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Find out more about the programs offered at Sydney Nursing School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Sydney Nursing School hosts mass casualty simulation

One hundred thirty-six Bachelor of Nursing students took part in a mass casualty simulation event recently.

Held at Sydney Nursing School’s Mallett Street Campus, the simulation is an interprofessional event that’s the culmination of the First-Line Interventions unit of study compulsory for all Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) students.

Sydney Nursing School hosts mass casualty simulation

Sydney Nursing School during its mass casualty simulation (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Playing the role of both nurse and patient, students took part in two scenarios: a fire that has broken out in a hospital ward in which patients and staff members have been injured, and a 21st birthday party where the roof of the hall has collapsed and injured the party-goers.

Jane Currie, Unit Coordinator and Lecturer in Nursing at Sydney Nursing School, said students are completely immersed in the experience. “Students not only perform the role of nurse on the day, but also experience what it’s like to be a casualty.”

Some of the many symptoms students have to treat include seizures, burns, smoke inhalation, traumatic head injuries, and fractured bones.

Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) student Casey Baldock spoke about how the experience will be greatly beneficial when working as a registered nurse. “You can only learn so much in the clinical labs. Being really immersed in the scenario and working with real people with real symptoms reiterates what we’ve learnt and consolidates our clinical skills.”

The unit aims to provide student nurses with the skills and knowledge for them to participate in the care of patients in the out of hospital environment.

“The idea of it is to both embed and consolidate clinical skills and non-clinical skills such as teamwork, leadership and communication,” said Ms Currie.

Coming together to share their knowledge with the students were a team of paramedics, medical practitioners, nurses and second-year medical students. “This is the best possible practice the nursing students can do before they go into the workplace,” said Ms Currie.

Four doctors from Bankstown Hospital also joined in the simulation to facilitate and provide support and guidance to the nursing students.

“It’s a fantastic opportunity for nursing students to be involved in these type of disaster scenarios so that they are prepared in how to manage real-life emergency situations,” said Dr Lai Heng Foong, Emergency Department Staff Specialist from Bankstown Hospital.

This is the third year the simulation has been running at Sydney Nursing School, growing from 57 students in 2014.

Sydney Nursing School

Sydney Nursing School  has been ranked number one in Australia for research and educational excellence in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject. Globally, a ranking of 13th was achieved, ahead of Yale and Columbia universities.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.
Entry requirements: Applicants must satisfy the university’s English language requirements for admission and have a high school diploma with at least a 66% average.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

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Find out more about the programs offered at Sydney Nursing School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

Providing healthcare in Laos prepares Griffith nursing student

Providing healthcare in a developing country wasn’t something Rachael Ovington expected to be doing while studying a Bachelor of Nursing at Griffith University.

But it was an experience she will never forget and will take with her when she seeks employment as a full-time nurse next year.

Providing healthcare in Laos prepares Griffith nursing student

Bachelor of Nursing student Rachael Ovington spent time in Laos helping provide healthcare. (Photo credit: Griffith University)

Rachael is one of almost 50 third-year Griffith Nursing students to travel to Laos this year as part of work integrated learning placement within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Griffith University was the first university health team to administer healthcare in in this rural district of Laos Laos, commencing work with this community Development Project in 2010.

“Being able to provide healthcare to people that have nothing and no access to health services because they live rurally really made me appreciate the healthcare we have in Australia and made me want to do so much more for them,” Rachael said.

“The community were really excited and happy to see us and so grateful and appreciative that we were there to help.

“This experience helped build my nursing skills in general as you have to do everything manually so your assessment skills need to be strong.  It also made me more aware of cultural sensitivities, which I will take with me well into my career.”

Rachael said her group, who were supervised by two Griffith staff members and two volunteer nurses, found many people to be suffering from colds and flus and physical injuries caused from manual labour.

She said they also provided a lot of health education to the children such as oral hygiene and hand washing, as well as teaching correct methods for lifting large objects safely.

“We took a bag of donated clothes to every village we went to, which we fundraised before we left,” she said.

“It was quite cold when we were there and to see some kids walking around with no shoes and in clothes that were too small was heartbreaking.

“We couldn’t do everything but we did the best we could.”

Griffith School of Nursing and Midwifery International Programs Director Hazel Rands said students who travelled to Laos were in a unique position and would be looked upon favourably by future employers.

“This experience is unique because it is recognised as clinical hours by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority and it enables student to be challenged by the extremes of poverty, poor communication and working with limited resources,” she said.

“Griffith seeks to prepare our students to become global citizens and this three-week experience allows them to see another healthcare system, live in a challenging environment, learn about themselves and acknowledge the unique set of skills that they have to offer as health professions upon graduation.”

Rachael is due to graduate at the end of 2016.

Nursing at Griffith University

The Griffith Nursing is committed to the development of nursing practice, theory and research in positive and visionary ways. The school is also committed to the development of graduates imbued with a solution-focused philosophy who will make a positive difference in nursing, midwifery and health care. Through developing research, consultancy and continuing education opportunities, Griffith seeks to serve the nursing and midwifery professions, the health care system and the broader community.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

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Learn more about Griffith Nursing School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com for more information!

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

Newcastle School of Nursing and Midwifery raises funds for sick children

The Newcastle School of Nursing and Midwifery has again raised additional funds for the Fairy Garden project at Lampang Hospital in Thailand, a project they helped open in 2012.

The Fairy Garden is a haven for sick children and their families as they cope with the stress of illness. Initially installed at John Hunter Hospital in one of the hospital’s courtyards, it proved so popular that planning began for one in Thailand.

Newcastle School of Nursing and Midwifery raises funds for sick children

UON volunteers help raise funds for sick kids (Photo: UON)

A group of Australian volunteers, including Associate Professor Pamela van der Riet, began planning in 2010 with the garden officially opening in April 2012. Delegations from UON have visited Lampang Hospital every year since, and are part of an increasingly international focus for the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

With the latest group of 12 students departing in the second week of June for a two-week study tour, their visit coincides with fundraising efforts at Callaghan, Ourimbah and Port Macquarie as part of recent International Nurses Day celebrations, with almost $2,000 raised.

While the student trip is covered by the Federal government’s New Colombo Mobility Program Plan, the Fairy Garden relies on community funding to sustain operations, which staff and students have continued to do since its opening.

Dr Van der Riet says that trips like these immerse students in the Thai system to teach the sorts of cultural sensitivities that help nurses in a multicultural nation such as Australia. Researchers are also discovering that these types of “healing environments” are having a tangible impact on the health of patients.

Dr Van der Riet has been lead author on two recent nursing journal articles written with her Thai colleagues on the experiences of families using the Lampang garden, with visible improvement to the quality of life for sick children. With many of the children suffering chronic diseases such as leukemia and other life-threatening illnesses at the hospital, having the only green space that exists in Lampang hospital available for children helps alleviate the stress of long-term stays.

University of Newcastle Nursing School

The University of Newcastle Nursing School has an innovative approach to undergraduate and graduate teaching, and enjoys close collaboration with local area health services in providing clinical learning experiences for students, in the provision of graduate programs and in the conduct of clinical research. The school strives to prepare and develop nurses to function in a wide range of clinical settings, occupational health facilities and rehabilitation services.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline candidates are encouraged to submit their applications before the end of September for the February intake.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Nursing School!

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Learn more about the University of Newcastle Nursing School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Griffith graduate a finalist in Nurse of the Year award

Significantly improving the immunisation rates in her local community has been the highlight of a nursing career for Gillian Hermosilla-Silva.

Named a finalist in the 2016 HESTA Australian Nursing Awards, the Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing graduate says she was ‘delighted and overwhelmed’ to have her efforts recognised in coordinating an immunisation outreach service for Logan City Council.

Griffith graduate a finalist in Nurse of the Year award

Gillian Hermosilla-Silva (Photo credit: Griffith University)

“We already knew that Logan has a very diverse socio-economic population and that there seemed to be issues with people getting immunised or getting them done in a timely manner,” says Gillian.

“When we made enquiries we noticed that there were patterns emerging showing how factors such as transport difficulties and childcare issues were proving problematic in parents getting their children to immunisation appointments.

“There is a general consensus that immunisations are important, but given that there was always going to be obstacles in the way for some people, I realised that the immunisations needed to be brought to them.”

Home-based appointments

It was in 2013, that Gillian set about organising a schedule of home-based appointments for people within the local community for whom visiting the clinics presented a problem.

“Predominantly our service is aimed at babies and children with the usual round of vaccinations such as whooping cough, diphtheria and MMR,” she says.

“At the moment, statistics indicate a rise in the cases of whooping cough, so exposing unprotected vulnerable children to the infection is something we really want to avoid.

“We do also see quite a few children who are placed within the Department of Child Safety; there is really a very wide range of need out there in the community.

“We also see a number of adult patients with various complications such as being on home oxygen and who may be at high risk of influenza. These people are also very important to us, in regard to vaccinating to support their health and for the benefit of the wider community.”

Gillian says that the two-day-a-week service has been extremely well received by the public, which has seen over 4,000 people and provided over 7,000 vaccines.

Currently 93% of children aged 12mth – <15 months are fully vaccinated which is slightly above the QLD average of 92.7%.

“I now have a team of 20 nurses that cover the service and visit approximately 10 homes per day with up to 4-5 children in each, so it’s going well,” she says.

“Twelve years ago, when I graduated from Griffith, I would never have dreamed I would have won an award for a mobile immunisations service, but it’s been a fantastic journey mainly within women’s and children’s health.

“The Griffith program set me up for a great career with so many options.”

Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

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Are you interested in Griffith Nursing School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Monday, July 27th, 2015

International honour for Griffith nursing professor

Griffith University’s reputation as a world-leading authority in nursing has been firmly cemented, following news that Professor Wendy Chaboyer is being inaugurated into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

Professor Chaboyer has travelled to the awards in Puerto Rico for the ceremony July 25.

Griffith Nursing School

Native Canadian Professor Chaboyer is being inaugurated into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame (Photo credit: Griffith University)

Operated by Sigma Theta Tau International, the awards recognise members who are nurse researchers and who have achieved significant and sustained broad national and/or international recognition for their work and whose research has impacted the profession and the people it serves.

Professor Chaboyer from the Centre for Health Practice Innovation, a part of Griffith’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland, has been acclaimed following a 13-year successful track record of research leadership both at Griffith and in nursing.

Her research focuses on patient participation in patient safest activities such as clinical handover and pressure injury prevention. This work aims to promote active patient engagement in their hospital care.

“This is really the pinnacle of my career and a public acknowledgement of how I have contributed to the nursing profession,” says Professor Chaboyer who is also the director of the first nursing centre of research excellence funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

“My goal all along has been to continually develop nurses’ capacity for high-quality research, which has never been as important as it is now. Mentoring early-career researchers has been an important part of my role and I have been extremely honoured to provide mentorship to many researchers, clinicians and students.”

Originally trained as an intensive care nurse in her native Canada, Professor Chaboyer arrived at Griffith 21 years ago, coordinating the first Master of Critical Care Nursing program in Queensland in 1994.

In 2002, as a response to a Griffith University call, she led a research centre grant submission, which was subsequently awarded in 2003. Named the Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor Chaboyer became its foundation director and remained its director until she became the Director of the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence.

Her personal area of research has focussed on patient safety and the role nurses play in improving the quality of hospital care and patient outcomes.

“My research has centred on the nurses’ role in preventing or mitigating patient risk and subsequent harm because nurses provide care twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Therefore it makes sense to focus on the role nurses can play to promote patient safety.”

Professor Chaboyer said her biggest wish is to overturn the ideology saying that nurses should be trained in hospitals rather than educated as professionals in universities.

“At local, state and national level, we are seeing an increase in the very uninformed opinion that nurses would be trained best in hospitals.

“Nursing is a profession, not simply a trade. In universities, nurses are educated to become the critical thinkers and quick decision makers that they need to be in order to provide high quality patient care.

“Critical thinking is crucial to the training behind today’s nurses.”

Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

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Would you like more information about Griffith Nursing School?Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Griffith grows its international nursing reputation

Griffith University’s reputation as a world-leading authority in nursing has been firmly cemented, following the announcement that Professor Wendy Chaboyer will be inaugurated into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

Griffith University Nursing School

Learn more about Griffith Nursing School

Operated by Sigma Theta Tau International, the awards recognise members who are nurse researchers and who have achieved significant and sustained broad national and/or international recognition for their work and whose research has impacted the profession and the people it serves.

Professor Chaboyer from the Centre for Health Practice Innovation, a part of Griffith’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland, has been acclaimed following 13 years of research leadership both at Griffith and in nursing.

Her research focuses on patient participation in patient safest activities such as clinical handover and pressure injury prevention. This work aims to promote active patient engagement in their hospital care.

“This is really the pinnacle of my career and a public acknowledgement of how I have contributed to the nursing profession,” says Professor Chaboyer, who is also the director of the first nursing centre of research excellence funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

“My goal all along has been to continually develop nurses’ capacity for high-quality research, which has never been as important as it is now. Mentoring early career researchers has been an important part of my role and I have been extremely honoured to provide mentorship to many researchers, clinicians and students.”

The first Master of Critical Care Nursing program in Queensland

Originally trained as an intensive care nurse in her native Canada, Professor Chaboyer arrived at Griffith 21 years ago, coordinating the first Master of Critical Care Nursing program in Queensland in 1994.

In 2002, as a response to a Griffith University call, she led a research centre grant submission, which was subsequently awarded in 2003. Named the Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor Chaboyer became its foundation director and remained its director until she became the Director of the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence.

Her personal area of research has focused on patient safety and the role nurses play in improving the quality of hospital care and patient outcomes.

“My research has centred on the nurses’ role in preventing or mitigating patient risk and subsequent harm because nurses provide care twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Therefore it makes sense to focus on the role nurses can play to promote patient safety.”

Professor Chaboyer said her biggest wish is to overturn the ideology saying that nurses should be trained in hospitals rather than educated as professionals in universities.

“At local, state ,and national level, we are seeing an increase in the very uninformed opinion that nurses would be trained best in hospitals.

“Nursing is a profession, not simply a trade. In universities, nurses are educated to become the critical thinkers and quick decision makers that they need to be in order to provide high-quality patient care.

“Critical thinking is crucial to the training behind today’s nurses.”

Professor Chaboyer will be travelling to Puerto Rico in July to be inducted into the International Nursing Hall of Fame.

Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

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Are you interested in Griffith Nursing School? If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at 1-866-698-7355 or email rachel@oztrekk.com. Find out how you can study nursing in Australia!

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

UQ researchers leading labour pain management trials

One in three women experience severe back pain during labour and birth, but that might change thanks to a safe, simple and effective treatment developed by University of Queensland researchers.

Professor Sue Kildea and Dr Nigel Lee from the Mater Research Institute-UQ are leading trials into a pain management technique that involves injecting sterile water into the lower back of pregnant women during labour.

UQ School of Nursing

Study nursing at the University of Queensland!

Professor Kildea, a Professor of Midwifery with the UQ School of Nursing and Midwifery, said earlier trials had shown the technique was an effective method of back pain management for about 90 per cent of women in labour.

“The injections have been likened to a brief wasp sting and there is pain relief almost immediately,” she said.

“Early research suggests that the injections may also reduce the likelihood of a woman needing a caesarean section during labour.

“This research trial will examine this effect.”

Professor Kildea said there were several theories about how the treatment worked.

“One is the gate-control theory, where you give a short, sharp, intense pain, similar to a wasp sting, that travels up the spine’s nerve fibres and blocks any other pain,” she said.

“The injection pain can also trigger natural pain-relieving hormones that are very strong and will take the back pain away.”

UQ School of Nursing professor said the technique offered additional advantages during labour.

“As we are just injecting sterile water, there is no effect on the mother’s state of consciousness and no effect on baby, and it does not limit a mother’s mobility or adversely affect the labour progress,” Professor Kildea  said.

“It a simple procedure and can be repeated as often as needed.”

Dr Lee and fellow research team-member  Professor Lena Martensson, from Sweden, are considered to be the  leading international researchers in the field.

The team has received National Health and Medical Research Centre funding to conduct the world’s largest study into the use of sterile water injections for back pain in labour.

They are seeking participants for the trial in 13 hospitals across Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia.

The treatment is not yet available in most Australian maternity units. Results from the study will determine if water injections can help reduce the caesarean section rate and will provide data to help more Australian hospitals offer the procedure.

UQ Nursing School

The UQ School of Nursing and Midwifery offers the Bachelor of Nursing and the Master of Nursing Studies.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (Accelerated option: 2.5 years)

Entry Requirements: Eligible applicants must have completed a high school diploma with a minimum GPA of 70% in the best six university courses. If you have completed post-secondary studies at the college and/or university level, those grades will also be considered. Prerequisite courses/subjects at the Grade 12 level include Senior English and one of Biological Science, Chemistry or Physics. Applications for credit for previous studies may be submitted by any person who gains entry to the nursing program.

Program: Master of Nursing Studies
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years

Entry Requirements: Master of Nursing Studies applicants will need to have a bachelor degree, as well as meet special entry requirements as set out in the program rules covering requirements for clinical practice.

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Find out more about the UQ Nursing School! If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, April 7th, 2014

UQ Nursing students roll up their sleeves in Cambodian health clinics

Fifteen University of Queensland nursing and midwifery students have put their skills into practice in Cambodian health clinics during a four-week placement in the country’s northwest.

University of Queensland Nursing School

Study nursing at UQ

UQ School of Nursing and Midwifery head Professor Catherine Turner said the International Community Health Placement program, open to second- and third-year nursing and midwifery students, gave participants credit toward their Bachelor degrees.

“Our undergraduate programs are distinctive in that we provide students with academic learning balanced with an equal component of hands-on clinical experience,” Professor Turner said, adding that the program gave students insight into international health practices and provided opportunities to assist in clinical practice environments.

UQ School of Nursing and Midwifery student Lucy Finlay, said the Cambodia trip had been a wonderful experience.

“It really opened my eyes to see how lucky we are in Australia,” Lucy said. “One definite highlight was assisting in the delivery of two babies. Both births went really well. The Cambodian midwives do so much with so little.

“It’s different to Australian hospitals where more resources are available for mothers and babies during the birth process.”

The group spent time at a Military Handicap Development Centre, a community centre and a community clinic near Angkor Wat temple.

This is the fourth year the University of Queensland has run the program.

Many of the students had not travelled outside Australia before.

Staff and students raised more than $8,000 before the trip to donate to communities they visited.

The money helped buy medicines, a birthing bed, a sterilizer and a computer, along with more than 50 kits of blankets, sleeping mats, clothes, mosquito nets, tooth brushes and soap for needy families, and contributed toward construction of a toilet block at a secondary school.

UQ Nursing School

The University of Queensland School of Nursing and Midwifery offers the Bachelor of Nursing and the Master of Nursing Studies.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (Accelerated option: 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Nov. 15, 2014

Entry Requirements: Eligible applicants into the UQ Bachelor of Nursing program must have completed a high school diploma with a minimum GPA of 70% in the best six university courses. If you have completed post-secondary studies at the college and/or university level, those grades will also be considered. Prerequisite courses/subjects at the Grade 12 level include Senior English and one of Biological Science, Chemistry or Physics. Applications for credit for previous studies may be submitted by any person who gains entry to the nursing program.

Apply to the Bachelor of Nursing at the UQ Nursing School!

Program: Master of Nursing Studies
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: Nov. 15, 2014

Entry Requirements: Master of Nursing Studies applicants will need to have a bachelor degree, as well as meet special entry requirements as set out in the program rules covering requirements for clinical practice.

Apply to the Master of Nursing Studies at the UQ Nursing School!

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Find out more about the UQ Nursing School! If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.