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Posts Tagged ‘Australian universities in Australia’

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

Griffith Law School ranked in the global top 50

Law at Griffith has gained significant recognition in the latest ShanghaiRankings’ Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2017.

Law (which includes criminology in this ranking) came in at number 38 after the ARWU evaluated 4000 universities in 52 subjects across natural sciences, engineering, life sciences, medical sciences and social sciences.

Griffith Law School ranked in the global top 50

Griffith Law School Dean, Professor Pene Mathew (photo: Griffith University)

Griffith Law School Dean Professor Pene Mathew said it was a fantastic result.

“This ranking places Law at Griffith first in Queensland, recognising the high quality of both our researchers and students,’’ she said.

“The ARWU takes into account a range of indicators of quality research, including publications in quality journals and number of citations, thus demonstrating the high quality of legal research at Griffith University.”

Associate Professor Michael Townsley, Head of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, said Criminology at Griffith has long been recognised as one of the best nationally, but the ARWU ranking indicates their strength is recognised internationally.
“The Griffith criminology community has an established international reputation for conducting research on important social problems. Our work has impacted the academic discipline and society in numerous ways, which is reflected in our ranking.”

Research scholarship

Professor Don Anton, Director of the Law Futures Centre at Griffith, said the result reflected the outstanding research produced by legal scholars at the Griffith Law School.

“We are aiming to demonstrate our research is ERA 5 quality—above world-class—and this ranking helps to confirm we are succeeding.”

The university also ranked 101–150 for Social Science, seventh in Australia.

“We are especially pleased with the strong endorsement of our strengths in social science as we have invested strongly in this area across the past decade,” said Professor Paul Mazerolle, Pro Vice Chancellor (Arts, Education & Law).

“This area’s strength positions Griffith to confront many of the social problems and challenges we face as a society.”

Griffith had four disciplines in the top 50 list: Hospitality & Tourism Management ranked 2nd, Nursing ranked 14th, Marine/Ocean Engineering ranked 28th.

The university ranked ninth in Australia for the number of subjects mentioned (30) and had eight subjects featured in the Top 100.

About the Griffith Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)

The Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) at Griffith Law School offers a professional legal curriculum that focuses on core areas of legal practice and the legal skills that lawyers must have. You will have the opportunity to choose law electives based on your interests, including clinical courses that emphasise practical legal skills, insights and experience. You can also double your career options, without doubling your study time, by completing a double degree. You’ll study two Griffith degrees simultaneously, giving you the career advantage of a special combination of skills.

  • Laws/Arts
  • Laws/Business
  • Laws/Commerce
  • Laws/Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Laws/Government and International Relations
  • Laws/International Business
  • Laws/Psychological Science
  • Laws/Science (Environment)

Program: Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Candidates are strongly encouraged to apply at least three months prior to the program’s start date to allow time for the pre-departure process.

Apply to Griffith University Law School!

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Find out more about these information sessions and about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

James Cook University answers the call for rural doctors

James Cook University is answering the call for more doctors in regional, rural and remote Queensland.

James Cook University answers the call for rural doctors

Study medicine at James Cook University and be a specialist in rural medicine! (Photo: JCU)

This year, the university is training 593 GP registrars through the provision of its specialist training program, Generalist Medical Training (GMT).  This program has been contracted by the Australian Government Department of Health to deliver Australian General Practice training (AGPT) in North Western Queensland.

Associate Dean Strategy and Engagement, Professor Jacinta Elston from JCU’s College of Medicine and Dentistry said 123 of the current registrars are JCU medical graduates.

“We have a regional mission with a focus on the needs of rural, remote and under-served communities, tropical medicine and the health of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

“In the 2005 to 2016 JCU Medicine Graduate Survey, 84% of students said they intended to practice medicine outside of capital cities, compared to the national average of 16%.

“We are now seeing the follow through of those intentions with 92% of GMT registrars placed in regional, rural and remote areas, according to the Australian Statistical Geography Standard – Remoteness Area index.”

Steven Bajwa is a sixth-year medical student at JCU in Cairns. He said he is looking forward to a career in a rural hospital.

“Being from Brisbane when I started my degree, I always envisaged I would return or work in another tertiary centre (metropolitan hospital),” he said. “The degree and placement from JCU have completely changed my perspective on my graduate location. I no longer want to work in tertiary centres, but in smaller, more rural hospitals.”

Cloncurry registrar Dr Cameron Hoare said it was his JCU medical degree that set him on the rural career path: “When I started doing medicine I really enjoyed emergency medicine. Then I found a place (Cloncurry) where I could do proper general practice and still do emergency medicine.”

After his first medical student placement in the rural town, Dr Hoare returned in his sixth year of medicine, and then again later to undertake GP training with JCU’s GMT. He applauded the GMT program, saying it strongly encourages doctors to take up rural and remote posts.

“GMT definitely has an advantage there that they are providing registrar training and trying to support registrars training out west, which is actually a great success.”

Mackay GP and GMT Medical Educator Dr Ciara Ross is also a JCU medical School graduate. She said it set her up for a career in rural practice.

“I liked that their focus of the medical degree was more in rural and remote medicine, which was where I ultimately wanted to end up, working in more of a rural community,” she said.

As a Medical Educator, Dr Ross guides Mackay region GMT registrars through their training. She said the program is attracting more people who, like her, genuinely want to stay in rural areas.

“I’ve had quite a number of registrars come to me who live in Mackay and want to stay in Mackay, worried that they could potentially be moved. I am quite happy to be able to reassure them that if Mackay is the place they want to be, then generally they can stay here.

“There is a new generation of doctors coming through who are really interested in remote medicine and want to work in regional hospitals. I think maybe in years gone by, the epitome of medicine was working in a tertiary centre (metropolitan hospital), but I think people are genuinely chasing these rural jobs now because they are a bit different and exciting.”

Dr Ross encouraged anyone considering becoming a GP to study with James Cook University and GMT.

“I would recommend GMT for GP registrar training because they offer good quality and supportive education in a variety of training posts with experienced supervisors.

“Because GMT was developed by JCU, they have the staff and resources of a university with experience in post graduate education, so you know you will be in good hands.

“The program also prepares registrars well to face the college exams, with lots of practice throughout the program and additional support.”

JCU will now look to expand upon its success in the provision of General Practice Training via additional funding from the Australian Government (Regional Training Hubs Funding). This funding will allow JCU to further build and connect regional specialist training pathways across Queensland.

JCU Medical School MBBS

The 6-year, full-time MBBS degree is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017 (Note: Early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants! Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Do you have questions about James Cook University and its medicine program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, July 17th, 2017

5 inside tips about studying nursing at the University of Sydney

First-year Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) student Mackenzie O’Toole agreed to answer 15 questions about studying nursing at the University of Sydney, including why she chose it, what she likes about it, and what surprised her most about university life.

5 reasons to study nursing at the University of Sydney

University of Sydney Nursing School

Here, Mackenzie discusses the five things she enjoys about studying nursing at the University of Sydney. To check out the full list, watch the video below, “15 questions with nursing student Mackenzie O’Toole.”

1. Where is the best spot at Sydney Nursing School?

Mackenzie’s favourite spot at Sydney Nursing School are the clinical simulation labs (SIM labs). The SIM labs are home to full-body manikins installed with the latest simulation technology. They provide a safe environment where students like Mackenzie can practice and improve their clinical skills while developing their confidence in the procedures they are learning in lectures.

Through simulated learning, students become proficient at

  • taking blood pressure
  • checking a pulse
  • listening to breath
  • heart and bowel sounds
  • dressing wounds
  • preparing and administering medications
  • conducting interviews, and
  • documenting patient information.

2. Why she chose a nursing degree

When asked why she chose a nursing degree, Mackenzie’s main reason was “to help others in need.” Nurses make a genuine difference to people’s lives. Mackenzie was also inspired by the nursing care she received when she contracted meningitis at just three months of age, an event that left her with hearing loss in one ear. Her passion for helping others grew from that point on. She wanted to treat others with the same care she had received.

3. How quickly she was able to undertake a placement

Mackenzie was amazed by how soon into her degree she was able to gain real-world experience in her placement. She was placed at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, which is located only blocks away from the university campus.

From the first year of the Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) degree, students gain invaluable practical experience through 880 hours of clinical placements across a wide variety of healthcare settings including emergency departments, intensive care units, paediatric units, mental health facilities and community health centres. Students also have the opportunity to undertake a clinical placement overseas.

4. How supportive her lecturers have been

Sydney Nursing School offers students a supportive environment in which to learn. They are taught by leading academics, clinicians and researchers who are part of the nursing and healthcare community. Mackenzie found her lecturers to be “amazingly supportive.”

Helping students from day one through to graduation, the University of Sydney has a network of services, facilities and experts to make university experience as smooth and rewarding as possible.

5. How much she loves working with different people

As highly trained and valued professionals, nurses work with a diverse range of people, including other healthcare professionals and patients from all walks of life. Mackenzie has loved how she has been able to study and work alongside people from a diverse range of backgrounds from around Australia and the world.

Students learn how to thrive in complex health environments and will build an understanding of how to work with other health professionals to provide the highest quality patient-centered care.

Study Nursing at the University of Sydney

Sydney Nursing School has been ranked number one in Australia for research and educational excellence in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject. Currently, the University of Sydney is ranked 9th in the world for nursing, according the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

Program: Master of Nursing 
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Intake: March 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: International applications are managed in rounds: Round 1 – May 25, 2017; Round 2 – August 17, 2017; Round 3 – October 6 2017

Apply to the University of Sydney Nursing School!

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Find out more about the programs offered at Sydney Nursing School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, July 12th, 2017

University of Newcastle opens NeW Space facility

The University of Newcastle’s (UON) $95-million NeW Space facility will soon be welcoming students and the community, with staff moving into the building last week.

Staff at NeW Space

Staff at NeW Space (Photo: University of Newcastle)

UON Vice-Chancellor Professor Caroline McMillen said this first stage in the transition of staff and students was an exciting milestone for the university.

“Over the past four years, we have watched this remarkable building take shape in the heart of the CBD, visibly transforming the Newcastle skyline and contributing to the renewal of our city and region,” Professor McMillen said.

“Opening the doors to our staff on Monday is a proud moment. While a building may have ‘great bones’ and a strong physical presence, it is the people who work and study there who will deliver the full potential of its design for the benefit of our community.”

UON’s Faculty of Business and Law and staff from the new School of Creative Industries will move into the city from Monday, with 320 staff working from the new city campus this week. Up to 3,000 students will study at NeW Space from the start of Semester 2, 2017.

NeW Space will deliver new academic and research programs in business, law and emerging fields including creative industries, innovation and entrepreneurship. The new campus will also play an important role in connecting the university with business, industry and community partners in Newcastle and the Hunter.

As part of NeW Space planning, the university has developed an integrated transport strategy to support students, staff and community members travel to and from NeW Space.

Transport options include new Callaghan-based park-and-ride facilities with over 300 parking bays available, a free UON-exclusive express shuttle bus service running every half hour during semester, and the introduction of a new Liftango ridesharing app to encourage ride sharing with 20 dedicated RideSharing car parks adjacent to The Conservatorium. One hundred fifty parking spaces with an independent parking operator have also been secured for staff and students in the CBD to support the university’s transition into the city.

University of Newcastle Chief Operating Officer, Nat McGregor, said the university also strongly encouraged active travel and public transport.

“We are actively encouraging staff and students to consider a range of travel options, including more sustainable modes of transport, such as walking, cycling and public transport,” he said.

“The university also continues to advocate for better and more frequent public transport options for our students and staff. We are working closely with transport providers and those that are responsible for planning the future transport strategies for the city and the region to facilitate further improvements to service provision.”

Independent analysis show that NeW Space will contribute $1.3bn in economic benefit to Newcastle and the Hunter, including almost $200 million during construction and a further $134 million annually flowing from the emergence of the CBD as a vibrant student hub.

NeW Space was supported by Australian Government funding of $30 million through the Education Investment Fund Regional Priorities Round, NSW Government funding of $25 million and an investment of $40 million from UON.

University of Newcastle Law School

Newcastle Law School will be moving to NeW Space, where law students will enjoy the highest quality social learning spaces, digital library services and information commons, collaborative learning and research spaces, and facilities for engagement with industry, business and the community.

Program: Juris Doctor / Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice
Location: Newcastle
Duration: 3 years
Intakes: February and July
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Law School!

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Discover more about how you can study at Newcastle Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

Stages of the Melbourne DVM

The primary aim of the Melbourne DVM curriculum is to graduate highly capable veterinary scientists whose abilities to solve problems, to draw on the substantial body of veterinary knowledge, to interpret evidence, and to make decisions and act upon them within a clear ethical and professional framework embody all of the graduate attributes to which the faculty aspires.

The University of Melbourne Doctor of Veterinary Medicine student experience

Study the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Melbourne

If you’ve applied to the University of Melbourne Veterinary School, or if you’ve received an offer, here’s what you can expect:

Years 1 & 2: Build solid foundations

Introduction to the scientific basis of animal health and disease with integrated studies in the following:

  • Veterinary bioscience and an integrated, systems-based study of anatomy, physiology, pathology and pharmacology of each organ system
  • Applications in animal health provides (determinants of disease in populations and in production animal systems)
  • Infections, populations and public health
  • Practical problem-solving and teamwork, including four hours per week of case-based group work

Year 3: Get career-focused, via Melbourne’s Tracks program

Commence your practical clinical training with an introduction to the principles of clinical practice and to species-based medicine and surgery. In addition to your general training, you can select a track in your chosen area of interest. You will have the opportunity to be involved in the extra practical classes and activities with classmates who share your interests.

Four tracks

  1. Production Animal Track
  2. Small Animal track
  3. Government, Industry and Conservation Health Track
  4. Equine Track

Year 4: A year of practice-based learning

Fourth year is also part of the Track program. It is a practical year, conducted under supervision in the University Veterinary Hospital and via external placements. This year includes a final, intensive one-week professional practice program, which consolidates knowledge in preparation for transition into the workforce.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to submit their applications as soon as possible.

Entry Requirements

Eligible Melbourne DVM applicants must

  • have completed an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree); and
  • have completed prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.
  • submit a personal statement (i.e., description of their interest in veterinary science and related experiences with animals).

Acceptable undergraduate science degrees at Canadian universities include science degrees with majors in agriculture, animal science, biochemistry, biomedicine, physiology or zoology.

Selection into the Melbourne DVM will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average and above should apply.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about the Melbourne DVM? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

Dentistry research at the front line of tobacco intervention

Dentistry research is at the front line of tobacco intervention

Sydney Dental School

Learn more about Sydney Dental School

Smoking is a primary risk factor for periodontal disease and oral cancer and is one of the leading preventable causes of death. Healthcare providers have access to evidence-based guidelines that can help patients quit smoking; however, the translation of that knowledge and adoption into daily practice remains low. Healthcare providers are missing opportunities to address tobacco-use with their patients due to limited time and lack of health behaviour change expertise.

Concerns around how best to manage patients’ tobacco-use are raised in dental settings across the world. Innovative strategies are emerging in the behavioural sciences area; however, screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRTs) methods can be difficult to apply to the individual patients.

How is dentistry research at the University of Sydney addressing this issue?

Professor Heiko Spallek, Pro-Dean of Dentistry at the University of Sydney  and Dr Brad Rindal, Associate Dental Director for Research at HealthPartners Institute, Minnesota are conducting a clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) to improve dental provider delivery of SBIRTs.

What does the clinical trial involve?

The overarching goal of this research is to reduce smoking-associated morbidity and mortality by increasing the number of dental patients who are referred for tobacco cessation counseling. This program aims to

  • evaluate the effectiveness of clinical decision support (CDS) and,
  • improve dental provider delivery of brief tobacco interventions and referrals to tobacco quitlines for further tobacco counseling.

In this research, the CDS is being integrated within two commonly used electronic dental record systems and will generate personalised evidence-based recommendations for dental providers. These records will help dental professionals to actively engage with patients who smoke as part of the course of usual dental care.

The tobacco CDS will be tested within two dental schools, the School of Dental Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and the Indiana University School of Dentistry as well as sixteen private-practice clinics. The research project is funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research for over two million US dollars.

Sydney Dentistry’s Doctor of Dental Medicine

The Sydney Dental School’s DMD is a graduate-entry program that has been purposefully designed to adhere to the well-rounded course structure of the North American postgraduate model, but has also maintained the sophisticated clinical training for which the University of Sydney has come to be renowned, giving students an applicable knowledge of dental health from the community to the laboratory.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales (Camperdown/Darlington campus)
Semester intake: February each year
Duration: 4 years

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Are you interested in dentistry at the University of Sydney ? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com for more information!

Tuesday, July 4th, 2017

Get into a physiotherapy program straight from high school

Physiotherapy, or physical therapy as it is also known, is a profession concerned with the prevention, assessment and treatment of human movement disorders and the promotion of movement and health. Physiotherapists—also known as physical therapists—require an extensive understanding of physical, structural and physiological aspects of human form and movement, as well as factors relating to human functioning and the acquisition of skills.

There is a high demand for physiotherapists, both in Australia and in Canada.

Get into a physiotherapy program straight from high school

Study physiotherapy in Australia (Photo credit: Monash University)

In Australia, professional degrees are normally undertaken straight from high school at the undergraduate level. Bachelor of Physiotherapy degrees in Australia are four years in duration, and suitable to those students who wish to gain entry into a physiotherapy program directly from high school, or who have completed an undergraduate degree in an area other than science/health science area.

Bachelor of Physiotherapy Programs at Australian Universities

James Cook University

Program: Bachelor of Physiotherapy
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years

Monash University

Program: Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Honours)
Location: Peninsula Campus, approx. 40 km south of Melbourne, Victoria
Next intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years

University of Newcastle

Program: Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Honours)
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Next intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years

University of Queensland

Program: Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years

University of Sydney

Program: Bachelor of Applied Science (Physiotherapy)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Next intake: March 2018
Duration: 4 years

Returning to Canada to Practice

Graduates who wish to become certified as a physiotherapist here in Canada will need to apply for certification through Canada’s provincial certification boards. In many cases these provincial certification boards will require applicants to also complete the certification process through Canada’s national physiotherapy regulatory board, the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (Alliance).

As an international graduate, you would first have your Australian university qualifications assessed by the Alliance to ensure these meet their requirements. If they meet the requirements, you would then complete the Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE), just like any other applicant.

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Do you have questions about Bachelor of Physiotherapy programs in Australia? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com, or call toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

University of Sydney speech pathology academics honoured

The Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences is known for world-leading education and research, and recently, three University of Sydney Health Sciences academics received prestigious awards at the annual Speech Pathology Australia National Conference.

Dr Elise Baker and Dr Belinda Kenny have received the Speech Pathology Australia fellowship. This is the highest public professional honour that the Association awards to members who demonstrate outstanding and significant and sustained contribution to the speech pathology profession.

University of Sydney speech pathology academics honoured at national awards

Dr Elise Baker (Photo: University of Sydney)

Dr Baker’s fellowship reflects more than 20 years’ experience teaching at university level in which she has consistently contributed to the profession of speech pathology and the care of people with communication disorders. She has provided high-quality submissions to parliament, numerous peer-reviewed journal articles and conference presentations. She has been the lead investigator on five competitive research grants number of successful grant applications.

Dr Baker is an expert in early phonological development and management of children with speech sound disorders.

Dr Belinda Kenny’s fellowship was awarded for her commitment to professional and ethical practice. She is a lecturer and researcher in professional ethics, clinical education and neurogenic communication and swallowing issues.

University of Sydney speech pathology academics honoured at national awards

Dr Belinda Kenny (Photo: University of Sydney)

She has developed a number of training packages for Speech Pathology Australia around ethics education and has been elected as a member of the Ethics Board three times.

Dr Kenny is committed to developing the speech pathology  profession through her teaching and has spent a decade supervising Honours and Higher Degree Research (HDR) students on the subject of ethical practice.

Sydney Health Sciences currently has four other fellows on staff including Leanne Togher, Michelle Lincoln, Sue McAllister and Mark Onslow—more than any other university. The discipline also has a Speech Pathology Australia lifetime member in Lindy McAllister.

Professor Tricia McCabe has been awarded the Elizabeth Usher Memorial Lecture, which she delivered at the Sydney International Convention Centre at the annual Speech Pathology Australia National Conference. The invitation to deliver the Elizabeth Usher Memorial Lecture is one of the highest honours given to speech pathology researchers in Australia.

The highly prestigious lecture is Speech Pathology Australia’s only annual lecture and Professor McCabe spoke on the topic “How do we change practice?”

University of Sydney speech pathology academics honoured at national awards

Professor Tricia McCabe (Photo: University of Sydney)

Professor McCabe is Head of Discipline and Associate Professor in Speech Pathology in the Faculty of Health Sciences. She has published more than 60 peer reviewed journal articles, supervised more than 20 research students, and has had $3.6 million in research grants.

Professor McCabe has spent much of the past 10 years working to improve treatments for children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). She has recently developed a self-directed learning package for speech pathologists to learn how to deliver ReST (Rapid Syllable Transition Training) treatment to children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech and Information for parents and the general community.

“It’s wonderful that three of our respected academics from the discipline of speech pathology have been recognised in this way. I wish to congratulate Dr Baker, Dr Kenny and Professor McCabe on their well-deserved achievements” said Health Sciences Deputy Dean Michelle Lincoln.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

In common with other departments at the University of Sydney, the discipline of speech pathology promotes students’ development of generic  communication and teamwork skills, as well as discipline-specific knowledge and skills. The course is designed to promote self-direction and encourages the graduates to have a sense of their own individuality and creativity. The university offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Speech Language Pathology program, intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field.

Program: Master of Speech Language Pathology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years
Application Deadline:  September 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Sydney Speech Pathology School!

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Are you wondering about the speech pathology program at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh!

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Scholarships for Master of Integrated Water Management are available

Master of Integrated Water Management Scholarships

Are you interested in joining a global community of leaders that is changing the way we tackle complex water management challenges?

The International WaterCentre (IWC) provides education and training, applied research and knowledge services to implement a whole-of-water cycle approach and develop capacity in integrated water resource management.

Scholarships for Master of Integrated Water Management are available

Brisbane’s City Cat ferries rely on proper water management

The International WaterCentre (IWC) is offering a full scholarships for high-calibre candidates accepted into the Master of Integrated Water Management (MIWM) commencing in Semester 1, 2018.

Up to two full tuition and full living costs scholarships (Type A – each valued at AUD 92,645* including tuition fees and living costs);
and one full tuition scholarship (valued at AUD $52,500*). *Scholarships values are subject to change and are relevant for the 2017 intake.

  • July 31, 2017: Applications close
  • August 23, 2017: Shortlisted applicants will be notified (via email)
  • November 1, 2017: Scholarships Selection Panel will make a final decision on successful recipients (by this date)
  • February 2018: the IWC Master of Integrated Water Management will commence at the University of Queensland

Eligibility requirements

To apply for a scholarship, you must

  • have completed an undergraduate degree in a related field of study from an internationally recognised institution; and
  • have at least two years of professional experience (paid work or volunteering experience) relevant to the program.

Although professional experience is not essential for admission in the MIWM program, candidates with relevant professional experience have a higher chance of securing a scholarship.

Selection criteria

The Scholarship Selection Panel will use the following selection criteria to assess and rank applications:

  1. Leadership qualities: including collaboration and teamwork, flexibility, initiative, communication skills, integrity and vision through professional, educational, community and other achievements.
  2. Professional and volunteering record: relevant employment and volunteering experience, achievements, membership of professional bodies and professional references.
  3. Academic record: an excellent academic record and a likelihood of success in further study.
  4. Commitment to promoting and driving the implementation of collaborative, whole-of-water-cycle, integrated and interdisciplinary approaches to water management.
  5. Potential outcomes: the likelihood of positive impacts on the individual and the water sector from participating in the MIWM program.

About the Master of Integrated Water Management

The Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland is one of the few courses in the world that takes a truly transdisciplinary, integrated approach to water management in both developed and developing country contexts. The degree is co-badged and co-delivered by leading industry practitioners and lecturers from International WaterCentre’s  founding member universities: University of Queensland, Monash University, Griffith University, and the University of Western Australia.

The Master of Integrated Water Management (MIWM) creates water leaders by drawing on international teaching and research from many fields to provide a transdisciplinary, whole-of-water-cycle approach. Students get the skills to consider the impacts of decisions systemically across environment, politics, law, science, culture, engineering, economics, health and society.

Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Do you have questions about the Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland? Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, June 26th, 2017

New hub for biomedical engineering research named after inventor of cochlear implant

A new institute that brings together biomedical engineers, clinical researchers and industry partners to develop real-world solutions for public health has been launched.

New hub for biomedical engineering research named after inventor of cochlear implant

Study at the University of Melbourne

Located in the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct, the Graeme Clark Institute for Biomedical Engineering (GCI) will be a hub for University of Melbourne researchers and industry partners to collaborate on developing new bionic devices, implants, drug treatments and assistive technologies like prosthetics, as well as diagnostics.

The institute is named after Professor Graeme Clark AC who invented the bionic ear along with his University of Melbourne colleagues, the first prototype multiple electrode implant device that successfully improved the ability of deaf people to understand speech.

The inaugural Director of the Graeme Clark Institute, Professor Mark Cook, says the Institute will link clinical and engineering fields in the pursuit of new solutions to public health.

“It’s fair to say that no biomedical engineering institutes, either in Australia or the wider world, have the scope and scale of the Graeme Clark Institute,” says Professor Cook.

“The Institute is in a unique position to capitalise on multi-partner collaborations that are critical to innovation and commercialisation. The novelty of the solutions we will develop comes through the direct interaction of the Melbourne School of Engineering, the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Science.”

GCI’s success will be measured in the impact of clinically driven research that solves clinical needs and engagement with industry to translate that research into clinical practice.

GCI researcher and Head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Melbourne School of Engineering, Professor David Grayden, says the university’s position as one of the top centres for biomedical engineering research in the world means it is well-placed to make significant contributions to the field.

“Projects will include modelling the human body in 3D to virtually assess and insert implants for joint replacements, testing the university’s world-first stentrode device in human trials, and building on its position as the top university for mechano-pharmacology, where tissues cells are mechanically measured to develop effective drug therapies,” adds Professor Grayden.

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