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Posts Tagged ‘Australian Public Health Schools in Australia’

Monday, June 12th, 2017

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

The effect of dog ownership on adult human health is the focus of a new pilot study by the University of Sydney.

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

Do dogs make people feel happy?

Led by Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney School of Public Health, the research team is seeking 100 non-dog owners to participate in the trial—people who are considering owning a dog as well as those who have no interest in doing so.

“Dog ownership is very popular in Australia with over 40 percent of households owning at least one dog,” Associate Professor Stamatakis said. “While anecdotal evidence suggests dog ownership is beneficial for human health, there is currently scant scientific evidence to back up this perception.

“Our research will provide valuable insight into the health benefits of dog ownership which could support programs promoting and enabling dog ownership as a means to increase physical activity, improve general health and prevent cardiovascular and mental illness.”

Differences in physical activity, cardiovascular and metabolic health, and psychosocial well-being will be assessed for three groups: participants who acquire a dog within one month, after an eight-month waiting period, or do not adopt at all.

Over the course of eight months, participants in the Physical & Affective Wellbeing Study of dog owners (PAWS) pilot will be asked to complete a small number of questionnaires over the phone and visit the Charles Perkins Centre or be visited at home three times for some simple physical measurements.

“These initial results will also inform the methods of a much larger trial, the first controlled trial to examine the health effect of ‘real world’ dog ownership,” Associate Professor Stamatakis explained.

What is public health?

Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens. Public health practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and providing programs and services to address these needs. Studying in this field as an international student gives Canadians an understanding of the public health realm on an international scale, making Australia a top choice for Canadians.

At the Sydney School of Public Health, the Master of Public Health program is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

New Master of Public Health offered at Macquarie University

OzTREKK is pleased to announce that Macquarie University has introduced a Master of Public Health!

New Master of Public Health offered at Macquarie University

Study public health at Macquarie University

The Department of Health Systems and Populations within the faculty of Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences will offer a Master of Public Health from 2017. Inter-disciplinary public health specialisations will be available in health law, ethics, and policy; health leadership; environmental health; global health; and research.

This is the perfect professional degree to engage in for a 21st-century approach to education and practice aimed at preventing disease, promoting health, and supporting healthy lives in a globalised world.

Career Opportunities

Studies in public health prepare you for careers in

  • health education
  • health promotion
  • research and policy development
  • project management
  • public health
  • health and community administration
  • advocacy and non-government organisations
  • international health and development
  • Public Health Clinical Practice

Examples of titles held by Master of Public Health graduates include (but are not limited to):

  • Public Health Specialist
  • Public Health Intelligence Officer
  • Health Partnership Program Manager
  • Epidemiologist
  • Health Data Analyst
  • Project Coordinator
  • Senior Legal Policy Advisor (Health)
  • Public Health Advisor

Potential employers include government, non-governmental organisations, business, public health clinical or community settings, multilateral aid organisations, or other groups concerned with health, human rights, indigenous issues, environmental health, health leadership, and/or development.

Graduates of the Master of Public Health research specialisation interested in pursuing further higher degree research would also be well-equipped to do so, and to move further into a research career.

Master of Public Health Specialisations

Students undertaking this course can choose from the following Master of Public Health specialisations:

  • Environmental Health
  • Global Health
  • Health Law, Ethics and Policy
  • Health Leadership

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: North Ryde, Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the Macquarie University Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at Macquarie University and the Master of Public Health program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

Study at the Sydney School of Public Health

Public health is
•   Preventing disease
•   Promoting health
•   Prolonging life

How do we encourage a more physically active population? How can we campaign to reduce tobacco use? How do we influence health policy?

Public health analyses and acts upon the problems that prevent us from enjoying a good healthy life. Achieving these goals comes in many forms: generating knowledge of the public health problem, advocating for change and solutions, and helping implement those changes. Above all, public health is about people – often the most vulnerable in our communities – giving them the power of education and programs which will improve their health, prevent diseases and prolong their lives.

Every day, graduates from the Sydney School of Public Health are making a difference to the lives of people in Australia and across the globe.

Sydney public health students and alumni talk about what drew them to the field, and where their postgraduate studies are taking them.

Learning opportunities are aimed at developing the essential knowledge and required skills of practitioners in the practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems to improve conditions and outcomes. The programs are offered at a graduate diploma and master’s degree level with an emphasis on a modern approach to improving health outcomes within disadvantaged and developing communities.

With a large number of units of study to choose from, you can tailor the program to suit your individual needs. You may choose to take a variety of subjects or study subjects within one of five pathways:

  1. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Communicable Disease)
  2. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Injury)
  3. Public Health Research
  4. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Chronic Disease)
  5. Health Economics/Health Policy

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, June 17th, 2016

Sydney public health researchers awarded top grant

Public health researchers at the University of Sydney tackled one of the biggest issues facing modern healthcare: turning healthy people into sick patients due to over-diagnosis and over-treatment made possible by new, highly sensitive screening and diagnostic tests.

Sydney Public health researchers awarded top NHMRC grant

Learn more about Sydney Public Health School

A panel of seven experts explored the hotly debated topics at a public forum from on May 30 at the university.

“We will consider a radical idea that sometimes wiser healthcare means less healthcare. Or at least, less healthcare for people who don’t need it, so we can give more healthcare to people who need it,” said Professor Alexandra Barratt, from the Sydney School of Public Health.

The research team was recently awarded a $2.5-million National Health and Medical Research Council grant to establish a Centre for Research Excellence (CRE) to develop strategies to mitigate the over-diagnosis and over-treatment issues.

“Recently, we have witnessed an explosion of new diagnostic and screening technologies available including advanced imaging, biomarkers and genomic tests. Some of these tests are even marketed directly to the public,” added Professor Barratt, CRE Chief Investigator.

“Ideally these tests improve health by identifying diseases or risks that need to be treated; however, sometimes these tests lead to over-diagnosis and over-treatment which not only harms patients but wastes health resources through unnecessary procedures.

“The CRE will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease. New diagnostics are already appearing in clinical use in these areas, and these diseases account for a large burden of death, disease and health care spending in Australia.

Public health researcher and ethicist Associate Professor Stacy Carter said, “Most importantly, this research is about improving health outcomes for patients, in Australia and internationally.

“Our findings will assist patients, citizens, healthcare funders and health professionals to adopt helpful new technologies and avoid harmful new technologies to get the best possible outcomes from our healthcare system.”

Health psychologist Professor Kirsten McCaffery said “We are an internationally leading, multidisciplinary team and Australia is at the forefront of this new area of research. This funding puts us in a unique position to continue and expand the world class work we are doing.”

Public Health at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the University of Sydney focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying public health at the University of Sydney, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 27th, 2016

JCU Master of Public Health / MBA combined degree

James Cook University has an illustrious record in public health education and research. The Public Health and Tropical Medicine discipline at  JCU represents one of the largest graduate public health training programs in Australia, and was one of a select group of academic institutions funded by the Australian Government to assist in training public health professionals.

JCU Master of Public Health / MBA

Study at James Cook University

Within the business discipline, leading-edge postgraduate study areas reflect global industry needs. Strong links to industry  and government agencies enhance opportunities for students within the program. Students develop leadership skills in the  management of people, organisations and change.

The joint Master of Public Health / Master of Business Administration degree enables health professionals to gain advanced management skills while undertaking further study in the area of their specialisation.

The program aims to develop the following knowledge and skills:

  • Understanding current major health and management issues, managing information and human financial resources within health care delivery organisations
  • Critical analysis by health managers in the context of national and global economic and political environments
  • Identification and analysis of management issues in health care delivery organisations and the identification of appropriate solutions

Program: Master of Public Health / Master of Business Administration
Campus: Townsville
Duration: 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to James Cook University Public Health School!

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Learn more about studying public health at James Cook University. Please email OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

JCU academic flying high

James Cook University academic Professor Peter Leggat was recently elected to the International Academy of Aviation and Space Medicine.

Full Members of the Academy or Academicians are selected for their outstanding contribution to aerospace medicine or recognise the eminent position they hold in this field or both. Full Membership is limited to 250 globally.

JCU Public Health School

Study aeromedical retrieval at JCU

“It is a great honour to be selected by the Academy,” Professor Leggat said. “It was a special privilege to know that my Academy nomination was championed by two of Australia’s leading aerospace medicine specialists,” he added.

The Academy was founded in 1955, its objective being the promotion and search for new knowledge in aerospace medicine, as well as contributing to international co-operation among those devoted to education and research in this particular field.

Aerospace medicine includes aviation and space medicine, the fields of medicine concerned with the maintenance of health, safety and performance of all those involved in aviation and space travel, in particular pilots and aircrew, but also all those involved in spaceflight.

Professor Leggat is currently Professor and Deputy Dean in the College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences at JCU. The College conducts one of the largest postgraduate public health programs in Australia, including specialisations in fields such as tropical and travel medicine, aeromedical retrieval and disaster health.

Professor Leggat is also the Dean of Education of The Australasian College of Aerospace Medicine, a professional organisation that oversees training and recognition of doctors working in aerospace medicine.

He will be invested as an Academician at a ceremony in Rome in 2017.

JCU Master of Public Health in Aeromedical Retrieval

The Master of Public Health (MPH) at JCU enables health professionals to gain postgraduate qualifications in the public health sector and is designed to serve the needs of health professionals in rural and remote areas, particularly in the tropics. JCU offers majors in Aeromedical Retrieval, Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness, Communicable Disease Control, and Health Promotion.

Graduates with an MPH Aeromedical Retrieval major will also be able to integrate and apply an advanced body of theoretical and technical knowledge in the discipline of public health, with depth in the epidemiology, history, physiological effects, and management of patients undergoing aeromedical retrieval in a range of aircraft and settings including the impact of ethical, cultural, legal and financial issues.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the university to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry requirements: In order to be considered for JCU’s Master of Public Health, applicants must

  • have completed an undergraduate degree in a related field; or
  • provide evidence of professional and academic attainments, including employment for a minimum of five years in health-related activities, as meets the approval of the faculty.

Apply to James Cook University Public Health School!

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Would you like more information about studying public health at James Cook University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith: adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Monash University at the forefront of consumer rights in public health

World Consumer Rights Day (March 15) is an annual occasion for celebration and solidarity within the international consumer movement—a movement that is vital in public health and medicine. The theme for 2016 is antibiotic resistance.

Monash University’s Adjunct Associate Professor Ken Harvey has been involved in combating antibiotic resistance for over 30 years. He was a founding member, and at various times author, Chair of the Antibiotic Writing Group and Board Member of Therapeutic Guidelines Limited. Recognising that pharmaceutical promotion was also a driving force for inappropriate antibiotic use, he has also been a prolific campaigner for truth in drug advertising.

Monash University Public Health School

What’s the truth in drug advertising?

Dr Harvey is an organiser and speaker at a seminar on the Advertising of Therapeutic Goods and Services to be held at the University of Sydney on March 17, 2016; one of a series of events celebrating WCRD.

“The seminar will explore the number of current policy issues associated with the advertising of therapeutic goods and services in Australia that warrant debate,” Associate Professor Harvey said.

Associate Professor Harvey, from the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, has a long-standing research interest in medicinal drug policy and, more recently the promotion of complementary and alternative medicine.

“Few consumers understand that most complementary medicines (labelled AUST L) are not evaluated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration to see if they work. In addition, there are no effective sanctions for misleading promotion,” Associate Professor Harvey said.

He said that the escalating use of vitamins and supplements represents a triumph of marketing hype over science and that mandatory labelling of complementary medicines (‘this product has not been evaluated by Australian health authorities to see if it works’), as well as legislation for timely and meaningful sanctions for advertising violations should be introduced.

“There is also a need for increased and better targeted post-marketing surveillance and reporting by the Therapeutic Goods Administration,” Associate Professor Harvey said.

In addition, there is concern that some groups of health professionals have uncritically embraced diagnostic and therapeutic modalities that lack evidence and put consumers at risk.  At the forthcoming seminar, Associate Professor Harvey will present a case study of unlawful advertising claims made by chiropractic clinics and the belated response by the Chiropractic Board of Australia to address such claims.

The School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash has organised and supported the seminar together with the University of Sydney, the Foundation for Effective Markets and Governance, Choice (Australian Consumers’ Organisation) and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

Civil society organisations represented include the Consumers Health Forum, Friends of Science in Medicine, Australian Skeptics, Doctors Reform Society and Stop the Australian (Anti) Vaccination Network.

Monash University Public Health School

With diverse leadership, across four campuses, the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine is the faculty’s principal source of skills in epidemiology (including clinical epidemiology), biostatistics and large scale clinical data-management.  The school emphasizes expertise in large epidemiological studies, multicentre clinical trials, clinical registries, evidence synthesis and health social science.

The Master of Public Health a 12-unit public health program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Health specialisation streams are offered in

  • Clinical Research Methods
  • Health Economics
  • Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
  • Health Services Management
  • International Health
  • Occupational and Environmental Health
  • Research

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree. With an application, students should also submit a 250-word statement of purpose outlining their area of interest and the reason why they would like to complete the course, and an updated curriculum vitae/resume outlining relevant work experience.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

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For more information about studying at the Monash University School of Public Health, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at 1-866-698-7355 or adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, March 11th, 2016

JCU professor honoured as a Fulbright Ambassador

James Cook University’s Professor Peter Leggat AM has been selected as a Fulbright Ambassador.

James Cook University public health

Prof Peter Leggat AM

Professor Leggat is one of 27 distinguished Australians based in Australia and in the United States (US) selected for a new flagship initiative by the Australian American Fulbright Commission, which awards prestigious Fulbright Scholarships for study in the US.

He received his certificate of appointment as a Fulbright Ambassador from the Hon. Steve Herbert, Minister for Training and Skills Victoria, and the US Ambassador to Australia, His Excellency Mr John Berry, at the Fulbright Presentation ceremony honouring 2016 Fulbright Scholars held in Melbourne on Feb. 25.

“It was an honour to be selected as an Inaugural Fulbright Ambassador,” Professor Leggat said.

“Fulbright Ambassadors will contribute to enhancing and promoting the Fulbright Scholarship Program, and help to strengthen cultural and academic exchange between Australia and the US,” he said.

“I am looking forward to further championing the Fulbright Scholarship program, particularly here in northern Queensland.”

Professor Leggat is the only Fulbright Ambassador selected based in Queensland and his initial term will run for two years over 2016 – 2017.

Established 66 years ago, the Australian American Fulbright Commission hosts the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship program, which aims to promote educational and cultural exchange between Australia and the US as well as support research and study by Australians in the US and the by Americans in Australia.

As a measure of the prestige and impact of the program, there have been more Nobel Prize winners (54) among Fulbright Scholarship alumni than from any other exchange program.

Professor Leggat, himself a former Fulbright Scholar, is based in the College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences in Townsville.

James Cook University Public Health School

JCU has one of the largest postgraduate programs in public health in Australia with more than 800 students enrolled. Courses include a popular disaster and humanitarian health specialisation at Graduate Certificate and Masters level and these courses have received national and international recognition.

The Master of Public Health at James Cook University enables health professionals to gain postgraduate qualifications in the public health sector and is designed to serve the needs of health professionals in rural and remote areas, particularly in the tropics.

There are five majors available within the Master of Public Health: Generic, Aeromedical Retrieval, Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness, Communicable Disease Control and Health Promotion.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, candidates are strongly encouraged  to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements

In order to be considered for JCU’s Master of Public Health, applicants must

  • have completed an undergraduate degree in a related field; or
  • provide evidence of other qualifications recognised by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the Division of Tropical Health and Medicine as equivalent to the above; or
  • at the discretion of the Dean of College submission, as an exceptional case, of other evidence of professional and academic attainments, including employment for a minimum of five years in health-related activities.

Apply to James Cook University Public Health School!

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Learn more about studying public health. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Sydney public health researchers advise us to take a stand

Workers who use sit-stand desks are just as productive as those who use traditional desks while enjoying a host of possible health benefits, according to a world-first study by researchers at the University of Sydney.

Sydney Dental School

Sydney researchers study benefits of sit-stand desks (Photo: University of Sydney)

Published in Preventive Medicine Reports, the pilot study measured the effects on the productivity of 30 call-centre workers using powered sit-stand desks.

Despite a growing number of intervention studies looking at the impact of sit-stand desks on workers’ sitting and standing behaviours, relatively little is known about the effects on worker productivity.

“Our study found that workers who increased their standing by up to 60-90 minutes a day were more active and felt more energised than workers who used traditional desks, while not compromising their work output,” said lead researcher Dr Josephine Chau, from the University of Sydney School of Public Health.

“They reported being more satisfied and feeling more productive at work.

“The proportion of workers who reported they had enough energy throughout their workday increased seven-fold, from 6 per cent to 44 percent when using sit-stand desks,” she said.

The findings of the study are good news for office workers who want to make the case for sit-stand desks in their workplaces.

“Sit-stand desks are a good option for office workers who want to reduce the amount of time they spend sitting during their working day,” Dr Chau said.

“A growing body of research suggests that prolonged periods of sitting is linked to a higher risk of developing chronic diseases, including obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. These health risks are particularly relevant for people with largely sedentary jobs, such as office workers.

“We must be aware of the dangers of our increasingly sedentary lifestyles and do all we can to combat this. A sit-stand desk is one of many things you can do to improve your health, but exercising is crucial.

“People shouldn’t assume that a standing desk means they don’t have to exercise. We need to sit less and move more,” she said.

Co-investigator Dr Lina Engelen, University of Sydney, said that prolonged standing also has its own risks.

“People need to be mindful to build up their standing time gradually and avoid going from no standing to standing all day at work.

“It’s a bit like training for a marathon—you don’t go from running 0 km to 42 km overnight. You need to help your body adjust to it gradually. Ideally, workers could aim for around two hours of standing or non-sitting time per working day.

The study was conducted over 5 months with more than 30 staff from the telecommunications company Optus as part of their health and well-being program.  It is a world-first in terms of a sit-stand desk intervention in a natural office environment using a sample of participants in jobs unrelated to health.

The research was a collaboration between the University of Sydney, Southern Cross University and Optus and was supported by a Sydney Medical School Early Career Researcher Grant.

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If you have any questions about studying public health at the University of Sydney, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, February 26th, 2016

Monash researchers conduct trial to determine if antibiotics may relieve low back pain caused by infection

It is estimated that four in five Australians will experience low back pain during their lifetime. Treatment options are limited, and low back pain remains the leading cause of disability worldwide.

Monash University Public Health School

Monash researchers to conduct trial to determine effectiveness of antibiotics on back pain (Image credit: Monash University)

Researchers from Monash University’s Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine in the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine are conducting a clinical trial to determine whether antibiotics are an effective treatment for low back pain.

This work has developed from their systematic review, which shows evidence of bacteria in the spines of people with low back pain and a clinical trial conducted in Denmark which reported promising results for antibiotic treatment.

The trial is premised on the hypothesis that some cases of low back pain may be caused by an infection in the spine. It is thought that after an injury to a spinal disc bacteria circulating in the bloodstream enter the disc and establish an infection which prevents healing and leads to ongoing pain.

The clinical trial team, comprising Monash University researchers Dr Donna Urquhart, Professor Flavia Cicuttini, Associate Professor Anita Wluka and Ms Molly Bond, is hopeful that the trial will provide valuable clinical data.

Dr Urquhart explained that low back pain is not just one condition, but that there are different types of low back pain. It is possible that one type of low back pain which results from infection may respond to antibiotic treatment.

“At present there is only preliminary evidence to suggest antibiotics might be effective so we need further research to understand whether they are beneficial for some cases of low back pain. While we hear that people are already trying antibiotic treatment for low back pain, it is too early for people to be requesting this treatment.

“It is also important for us to understand the effectiveness of antibiotics for low back pain given the problem of antibiotic resistance in the community” Dr Urquhart said.

The trial has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and is currently recruiting participants.

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For more information about studying at the Monash University Public Health School, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.