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Posts Tagged ‘Australian Medical Schools in Australia’

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

James Cook University is Australia’s Tropical University, and JCU medical graduates are be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

RSVP to meet JCU in Toronto June 22!

Recently, Uni Reviews ranked the top Australian universities for medicine using a formula combining

  • medical school size (student numbers)
  • student and graduate satisfaction with medicine courses (% satisfied)
  • indicative graduate salaries (based on pay, study and unemployment rates).

Medicine includes General Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics, Anaesthesiology, Pathology, Radiology, Internal Medicine and General Practice.

Uni Reviews presents independent reviews, ratings and rankings of Australian universities. Site content is published by UniCurve for the benefit of students.

As listed by Uni Reviews, the top universities for medicine in Australia for 2017 are

  1. James Cook University
  2. University of Western Australia
  3. Monash University

James Cook University

JCU Medicine tops the subject rankings for Medicine in 2017. The program is relatively large (1,155 students), has the highest rate of satisfaction among student and graduates (92%) and produces solid job outcomes ($65,000 indicative graduate salary).

University of Western Australia

The University of Western Australian Medical School is ranked 2nd in Australia for Medicine. The faculty’s medical graduates enjoy the highest salaries in Australia ($68,130) and have a solid rate of course satisfaction (84%).

Monash University

Monash University Medical School is in the top 3 for Australia. The school is the largest in Australia (2,452 students) and is highly rated by students (85% satisfaction).

James Cook University Medicine & Dentistry Seminar

It’s no secret we are huge fans of JCU’s commitment to helping rural and under-served populations. If you are interested in a career in medicine or dentistry, but are looking for something more extraordinary, please join OzTREKK and JCU Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Wronski for this upcoming seminar. Find out why JCU is interested in Canadian students, and how you can help bring better health to those in need.

Toronto
Venue: Pinnacle Room, Sheraton Centre Hotel, Toronto
Date: Thursday, June 22, 2017
Time: 6 – 9 p.m.

Make sure to RSVP to save your spot!

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Discover more about studying JCU Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Sydney Medical School’s long history of training students in rural NSW is boosting local economies and the number of graduates who want to work as rural doctors.

“Rural training experience increases the likelihood that doctors will commit to working in rural locations long term,” said Professor Conigrave. “This is why we have had a longstanding commitment to the training of rural doctors for more than 20 years.”

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Learn more about Sydney Medical School

The University of Sydney has a School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural Health in Broken Hill and Lismore.

“By the end of 2017, almost 1,000 of our medical students will have undertaken extended training placements in these four centres,” said Professor Conigrave.

“At graduation, these students are telling us that they would prefer to work in rural areas. The government’s new funding for the rural doctor training ‘pipeline’ will help these students to achieve their ambitions and their talents for rural health and medicine.”

However, Professor Conigrave said that there were not enough medical training positions to convert students’ intentions into medical careers in rural areas.

“We’re doing very well in priming the pipeline for the training of rural doctors—many more new medical graduates are now trying to get jobs in rural hospitals as interns. In fact, there are now significantly more applicants for these critical rural junior hospital training jobs than there are jobs available.”

Underlining the university’s contribution to rural economies, Professor Conigrave said, “We have a track record of excellence in rural medical education and we are making significant contributions to local economies.”

“At Dubbo and Orange, for example, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health contributes close to $7 million each year in direct local expenditures.

“This provide jobs for more than 50 people in central western NSW, all of whom live locally—they make up almost 30 full-time equivalents. Many of them are highly skilled, and might otherwise have been obliged to look elsewhere for work,” said Professor Conigrave.

“Then, of course, there are also indirect economic benefits. The 64 students that take extended rural placements each year bring business to local shops, sporting facilities and food outlets, and contribute to community life and projects of all sorts.

“In addition, the School of Rural Health requires many local services: motor vehicles, IT, transport services, plumbing, the maintenance of grounds and even the paint on the walls.

“But most importantly, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural in Broken Hill and Lismore are helping to lift access to quality healthcare among Australians in rural and remote areas,” added Professor Conigrave.

In April, the University of Sydney won $3 million in federal funds to establish Rural Training Hubs in Broken Hill, Dubbo and Lismore to boost rural-based training and career pathways for trainee doctors.

Commenting on the award of funding Professor Conigrave said, “We’re very pleased that the Federal Government has recognised the need to create this training pipeline.

“The funding will enable junior doctors with ambitions in rural medicine to undertake specialist training in rural rather than metropolitan centres, developing into fully fledged experts who can provide rural communities with specialist healthcare in all major fields of medicine, including general practice and rural and remote medicine and surgery.”

Study medicine at the #1 medical school in Australia

Did you know the University of Sydney Medical School is ranked #15 in the world and #1 in Australia (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017)? It’s true!

Sydney offers the very popular MD program, a four-year professional postgraduate-entry course with three primary aims for graduates: excellent clinical skills and preparedness for practice; experience in research; and experience and awareness of health in an international setting. It includes weekly clinical experience in leading hospitals from the very first weeks, regular PBL (problem-based learning) exercises in small groups, traditional lectures with expert practitioners, and ongoing opportunities to participate in research.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales (Camperdown/Darlington campus)
Semester intake: January 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 20, 2017
Deadline to submit all documents: Monday, June 26, 2017
Skype interview invitations sent: mid-July
Skype interviews: July 31 – August 11, 2017
First-round offers made: from late August (and may continue to be made until December 2017)

Apply now to Sydney Medical School!

If you have any questions about Sydney Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 26th, 2017

James Cook University trains specialist doctors for regional and remote communities

James Cook University’s ability to train and keep GPs and medical specialists in regional and remote settings has been given a big boost.

As part of the Federal Government’s Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training program $54.4 million has been allocated over 2016–2017 to 2018–19 for new Regional Training Hubs and University Departments of Rural Health.

James Cook University trains specialist doctors for regional and remote communities

Prof Richard Murray (Photo: JCU)

JCU will operate three of the new Regional Training Hubs—in North, Western and Far North Queensland.

Professor Richard Murray, Dean of JCU’s College of Medicine and Dentistry, said the investment will allow JCU to be more involved in training the specialist doctors that regional and remote communities need.

“The number of graduating doctors in Australia has almost tripled over the past 15 years, yet what we have seen is graduates piling up in the cities, looking for city-based specialist training jobs. The regions are still left to rely on importing doctors from overseas. This announcement is a welcome first step towards a system that trains specialist doctors and GPs where they are most needed,” he said.

Professor Murray said it was time for Commonwealth, state and territory governments to commit to a revolution in the further training of medical graduates.

“We need a system that sees much more specialist training based in regional Australia, with a city rotation only as needed,” he said.

Professor Murray said JCU has long been a national leader and advocate of training medical graduates for work in regional Australia.

“This announcement shows that Assistant Minister for Health David Gillespie is listening to the arguments we have been making over the last decade,” he said.

Professor Sabina Knight, Director of JCU’s Mount Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health, said the funding will enhance rural health.

“We do a lot of work encouraging students to stay and work in rural and remote areas, but if they can’t get an internship in a regional hospital such as Mount Isa, then they have to go to a city for training and often end up disappearing into metropolitan areas,” she said.

Professor Knight said the initiative fills in a crucial gap in the current system.

“This was the missing bit in the pipeline between having early year medical students and turning out medical specialists in a rural or remote area. We will have a better pathway now and a much better ability to follow through on their training,” she said.

Professor Murray welcomed the funding as a valuable first step, but said the program would be even more fruitful if states and territories now came on board with their support.

About the JCU Medical School MBBS Program

The 6-year, full-time MBBS degree at James Cook University is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017 (Note: early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants. It is recommended that students apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

As part of the MBBS application process, all candidates must participate in an interview with Prof Ian Wronksi. For the 2018 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this June, or
  • via video-conferencing following the August 30th program application deadline.

In-person interviews in Canada (dates are subject to change)

June 22 – 23, 2017: Toronto
June 24, 2017: Edmonton
June 25 – 26, 2017: Vancouver

 

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at Australia’s tropical university—James Cook University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, May 15th, 2017

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

Regional communities and future health professionals studying through The University of Queensland are big winners from a multi-pronged $54.4 million Federal Government initiative.

In Queensland, UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), providing a major boost to education, training and research in rural south Queensland for nurses, midwives and allied health workers.

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (Photo credit: UQ)

Three new medical training hubs under UQ control will also be established in Central Queensland, Wide Bay and South West Queensland, operating with an aim of retaining doctors in regional areas.

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said research indicated students who experienced rural practice were far more likely to return to work rurally once qualified.

“For the local communities, this is part of a long-term strategy to address maldistribution of the health workforce,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Rural and remote regions of Queensland and Australia often face challenges in attracting and retaining qualified health professionals.

“Students on rural placement will discover the diverse range of professional opportunities available in regional areas, thus enhancing the sustainability and viability of rural health care services.”

UQ joined with the University of Southern Queensland and the Hospital and Health Services of Darling Downs and South West in the successful bid to establish the Southern Queensland Rural Health UDRH.

The UDRH will help provide rural experience to student nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and exercise physiologists.

Commonwealth funding has also been awarded to provide additional clinical, academic and administration staff at UQ’s three regional medical training hubs:

  • Central Queensland: located at Rockhampton, with sub-units at Gladstone and Emerald
  • Southern Queensland: located at Toowoomba, with sub-units at Charleville in south-west Queensland
  • Wide Bay: located at Bundaberg, with sub units at Hervey Bay and Theodore.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward said the hubs would offer doctors rural opportunities at all stages of their medical training.

“This will facilitate postgraduate training opportunities, including specialties, so doctors can stay in regional communities for training and not have to return to the city,” Professor Ward said.

“The Department of Rural Health and the training hubs will build on the high quality education and training experiences already offered by UQ’s Rural Clinical School.”

Announcing the funding, Assistant Minister for Health Dr David Gillespie said regional and rural health training not only addressed workforce shortages and service expectations, but was also essential to regional economic growth.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Faculty of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The faculty is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ Doctor of Medicine!

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Find out more about UQ Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 11th, 2017

Why should Canadians consider studying at JCU Medical School in Australia?

There are many reasons that encourage people to study medicine. Among the most popular include the desire to help others. Sometimes that wish goes beyond the standard “I want to make a difference in my community” to “I want to make a difference in the world.”

Why should Canadians consider studying at JCU Medical School in Australia?

Prof Ian Wronski (Photo: JCU)

So what makes JCU stand out from other Australian universities? And how on earth can we compare Australia’s and Canada’s health care needs?

James Cook University may not be the largest university, or the most well-known, but JCU has something the others don’t: their riveted focus on Aboriginal health, rural medicine, public health, tropical medicine and the needs of under-served populations.

James Cook University Deputy Vice Chancellor Tropical Health and Medicine Professor Ian Wronski explains why JCU concentrates on rural, remote and tropical health care.

“JCU was established as Australia’s university for the tropics, and so we focus on programs that are particularly relevant to the tropical world,” Prof Wronski says.

“In the medicine, health, molecular science part of the university—that includes all the health professions and molecular biology and biomedicine, and the research institutes we have—we’ve particularly targeted issues relating to under-served populations, especially rural, remote, indigenous and tropical peoples.”

Tropical peoples? How can that relate to Canada you ask? When speaking about Canada, most people think frigid winters, not tropics.

But the connection between Australia and Canada is stronger than you may think.

In fact, in 2013, JCU Medical School Dean and Head of School Richard Murray travelled to Canada as a member of an Australian government delegation at a Canadian-Australian roundtable on recognition of professional credentials between the two countries.

Dean Murray made a case for why Canada and Australia should collaborate our shared interest in health care innovation to meet the needs of our geographically dispersed populations. Prof Murray said that the opportunities this creates for Australian and Canadian practitioners to gain experience in each other’s countries could only benefit the quality and depth of rural medical services.

“In medicine for rural areas, there are opportunities for movement and exchange for students, doctors in training as well as specialists in rural general practice and other generalist specialties. Innovation in areas such as telemedicine and socially accountable health professional education are shared interests,” Prof Murray wrote in an article he published in the JCU Medical School’s journal, A Taste of our own Medicine.

Prof Wronski said there are many countries in a similar position to Australia, including Canada. Like Australia, our population is concentrated on the fringes of the country, where the climate is most ideal and the land most usable. But where people live in rural and Northern Canada, away from the general population, finding health care can be more challenging—just like the people in remote and tropical locations of Australia.

So what kind of student does James Cook University wish to attract?

When asked why JCU likes Canadian students, Professor Wronski narrowed it down: “Canada has a good education system, and students come to us well educated and broad-minded. Also, many of them have that fire in their belly to put something toward the health services side of making life better for under-served populations. Canada, like Australia, has large areas, large rural and indigenous populations,” the JCU professor explains.

“We like Canadian students because we see ourselves as a global hub, and we want to attract students who are interested the tropical world and the health of under-served peoples.”

Does this sound like you? If you’re passionate about changing the world, particularly the lives of those who live in rural or remote areas, JCU wants to talk to you!

About the JCU Medical School Medical Program

The 6-year, full-time MBBS degree is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

As part of the MBBS application process, all candidates must participate in an interview with Prof Ian Wronksi. For the 2018 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this June, or
  • via video-conferencing following the August 30th program application deadline.

In-person interviews in Canada (dates are subject to change)

June 22 – 23, 2017: Toronto
June 24, 2017: Edmonton
June 25 – 26, 2017: Vancouver

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017 (Note: Early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants! Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

Are you planning to study medicine at the University of Queensland? If so, let us introduce you to the UQ Medical Society (UQMS) and their shenanigans (which we hope you plan to be a part of next year!).

The UQ Med Revue is a medical student variety show at the University of Queensland, put on by the UQMS, that normally has in the order of 250 students involved. Students from all four years of med come together to create a hilarious comedy that is jam-packed with puns, parodies, and Professor Parker’s pecs.

UQ medical students act, sing, dance, write, direct, play instruments, make props, design costumes, do hair and make-up and most of the tech for the show making it a truly home-grown production! As the biggest event on the UQMS calendar, the show runs three sold-out nights. In 2017, the dates will be August 13–15th, so mark it in your calendar!

Last year’s Med Revue took them on an adventure “Inside Gout,” with the help of Mr. Hugh Jackman.

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

2017 UQ Med Revue Convenors (L-R): Joel Russell, Ailsa Lee, Will Saunders, Jessica Monteiro and Chris Strom (Photo credit: UQ)

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The UQ Faculty of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the Doctor of Medicine program at UQ!

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Would you like more information about studying at UQ Medicine? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, April 21st, 2017

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

James Cook University researchers from the College of Medicine and Dentistry may have found a way to reduce trauma and prevent infections after Caesarean births.

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

L to R: Lisa Davenport, Professor Geoffrey Dobson, Dr Hayley Letson (Photo: JCU)

Caesarean delivery rates are increasing worldwide and around a third of all mothers in Australia, USA and UK give birth surgically each year, but a C-section is not without risks.

Fourth-year JCU Medical School student Lisa Davenport joined Dr Hayley Letson and Professor Geoffrey Dobson from the Heart, Trauma and Sepsis Research Laboratory at JCU to research ways to reduce the stress response to the trauma of surgery.

Caesarean sections involve one or more incisions in a patient’s abdomen, known as a laparotomy, and are a common option for delivering babies.

But they have a raft of potential side-effects, including cutting the baby, post-surgery infection, fever, excessive blood loss or clotting, scar tissue formation and extended stays in hospital.

Dr Letson said a single laparotomy is a major injury.

“It can activate the brain’s stress response from the multiple ‘damage’ signals sent out from the original incision,” she said.

The JCU research showed that a laparotomy causes inflammation and an early activation of the immune system, which can then spiral out of control.

Ms Davenport examined whether an Adenosine, Lidocaine and Magnesium (ALM) drip could reduce the trauma of surgery when used by itself in experimental models. She discovered that adverse responses were reduced when the subject was infused with a small amount of the ALM drip.

“Low volume therapies may be important, because you want to avoid large fluid volumes that can shock the body a second time,” she said.

Professor Dobson said that precisely how tiny volumes of the ALM drip works is an active area of investigation in the Dobson Laboratory, but experiments have shown it protects against infection as well.

Dr Letson said the ALM therapy appears to be linked to improved brain control over whole body function at times of surgical stress. “It suppresses signals that activate immune cells and promote inflammation,” she said.

The work has applications to other major surgery and especially to rural and remote medicine. Professor Dobson said new frontline drugs are urgently required to make major surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon, with the potential to reduce complications and massively reduce health care costs, and possibly reduce waiting times for elective surgery.

“The global surgical statistics are staggering. Of the 234 million major surgeries performed every year, every hour there are around 1,000 deaths and 4,000 major complications, and 50% may be preventable,” he said.

Ms Davenport has completed the study and is currently analysing the data and writing a paper for a high-profile surgical journal.

Her study parallels the Dobson Lab’s ongoing trauma work being supported by the US Military, and a new collaboration that started late 2016 with the National Institutes of Health in the United States.

The research team is also pursuing funding opportunities to investigate the use of ALM fluid as a potential treatment for post-partum haemorrhage. Of the 500,000 maternal deaths each year, approximately 25% are due to haemorrhage.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

Don’t miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal.

Don't miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Finding out what comes after medical school is also a very big deal. To help make the process a little smoother, OzTREKK hosts medical licensing webinars to assist future Australian medical school students to understand the ins and outs of returning to Canada as an international medical graduate. And the first one will be held tomorrow, April 6, at 7 p.m. EDT! During the webinar, you will learn more about

  • the Australian Medical School systems and structure
  • Australian med school rankings
  • medical degree titles such as MD and MBBS
  • Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE), MCCQE1 and MCCQE2
  • the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) program and rates
  • provincially specific programs available to international medical graduates
  • the latest information on the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor;
  • information about the licensing examinations in Canada and the US, what they are, when you need to sit them, and the application process; and
  • the latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia.

…and much more!

Medical Licensing Webinars Schedule

OzTREKK students are invited to attend as many webinars as they wish!

Webinar #1
Date: Thursday, April 6, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #2
Date: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #3
Date: Wednesday, June 14, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #4
Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #5
Date: Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #6
Date: Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Please note the medical licensing webinars are extremely popular and are by invitation only. If you are an OzTREKK student, you and your family will be invited to one of the licensing seminars.

Learn more about studying at an Australian Medical School!

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Would you like more information about the upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinars? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, March 31st, 2017

Introducing the UWA Doctor of Medicine program

Every year, OzTREKK helps hundreds of Canadian students apply to Australian medical schools. And now we are pleased to say we now have another med school option: the University of Western Australia.

Introducing the UWA Doctor of Medicine program

Study medicine at UWA

Program Overview – Doctor of Medicine (MD)

The UWA Doctor of Medicine (MD) program at the University of Western Australia is a highly integrated and contextualised course with many innovative features to equip graduates with the capabilities to work as a doctor in Australian and around the world.

The overall aim of the MD program is to prepare students to become accountable, scholarly, capable and caring doctors, committed to the well-being of the patient, of the community and of society. This includes teaching in professionalism, leadership, advocacy, education and scholarly practice.

The Doctor of Medicine is structured around six core themes: Professional, Leader, Advocate, Clinician, Educator, and Scholar (PLACES). The PLACES curriculum structure encourages students to learn about the humanistic and non-technical aspects of being a doctor, while continuing to emphasise the importance of developing clinical competence and scholarly capabilities.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: May 30, 2017; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Entry requirements

To be eligible to apply to the UWA Medical School MD, candidates must

  • have completed a bachelor degree with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 5.5 out of 7;
  • have completed the GAMSAT or MCAT: 123/123/123/123 and an overall minimum of 492.

In addition, it is recommended that applicants have undertaken the following units/subjects:

  • Physics to year 12 level
  • Chemistry to first-year university level (including completion of Grade 12 level chemistry)
  • Biology or human biology at first-year university level

Test scores will not be considered if the exam results are more than 2 years old. Applicants will be shortlisted for interview based equally on GAMSAT/MCAT and GPA. Interview dates TBC.

Apply to the UWA Doctor of Medicine program!

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Find out more about the UWA Doctor of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

Projects tackling key health challenges of antimicrobial use and skin cancer are the first to be funded under a flagship initiative by the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine.

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

UQ Centre for Clinical Research

Deputy Executive Dean and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Melissa Brown, said the faculty is committed to progressing worthy world-class research by providing operational support over five years to deliver health outcomes.

“Our Health Outcomes Programs, or HOPs, represent a strategic approach to faculty research, in collaboration with our hospital and health partners,” Professor Brown said.

“These are very specific and targeted programs of research that address an identified health problem and will produce a specific and visible benefit.”

The first project selected will address high rates of infection in critically ill patients by optimising antimicrobial therapy.

The research team will use whole genome sequencing to rapidly determine which bacteria are causing infection so the most suitable drug and dose combination can be given. Once the process is established, the research team will test it in the clinic and determine its benefits to individual patients and the health system.

The project led by Professor Jason Roberts and Professor David Paterson includes researchers from UQ’s Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR) and School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences (SCMB).

The second program to be supported focuses on harnessing technology to address the problem of high melanoma incidence and mortality.

The research team will recruit high risk participants to test targeted screening using 3D total body photography and mobile teledermoscopy in the context of the Australian health care system.

Results will be used to drive evidence-based changes to clinical practice.

The project will be led by Professor Peter Soyer of UQ’s Diamantina Institute and Professor David Whiteman, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, and includes collaborators from QUT, QIMR Berghofer and UQ’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business.

Professor Brown said both teams should be congratulated for working collaboratively to create change and translate research into tangible health outcomes.

“These projects were selected following a competitive application process engaging interstate reviewers in late 2016, and we look forward to seeing them make a difference to health care in the years ahead.”

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about studying medicine at UQ. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.