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Articles categorized as ‘Video Corner’

Friday, October 20th, 2017

Sydney Law School lecturer discusses misconceptions about crime

Punishment isn’t always the answer to reduce crime.

Sydney Law School lecturer discusses misconceptions about crime

Host Chris Neff – Open for Discussion podcast

How do we encourage people not to break the law? Most times we think of crime, it’s after the fact. But what if through certain measures we could stop a crime before it happens? No, it’s not a Tom Cruise movie, simply the idea that through certain measures, the opportunity for crime may be removed.

Dr Garner Clancey from Sydney Law School joined Open for Discussion to chat crime statistics and the strategies used today to prevent crimes. Dr Garner Clancey, a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Sydney Law School, is an expert in crime prevention and statistics and over the past 25 years has worked with NSW Police, the Department of Juvenile Justice and other government organisations on a number of crime prevention strategies.

Here, Dr Clancey shares four misconceptions about crime:

Myth 1: The crime rate is going up

We’re not in the grips of a crime wave. In fact, the overall crime rate in NSW has been declining since the turn of the millennium. In the UK the crime rate began declining around 1995, while in the US it began to fall in 1990, 1991.

And the falls have been quite dramatic. For example, in the year 2000 there were approximately 82,000 incidents of burglary per year in NSW, while last year it was only 32,000. And the murder rate in the state is the lowest it’s been in 40 years.

Problem is, no one can explain the major drop—it’s criminology’s “dirty little secret!

Myth 2: Closed circuit television is a good prevention tool

CCTV can be successful in preventing thefts from shops; however, the data shows that for public places it’s really not all that useful.

People may not know the cameras are there, especially if they’re intoxicated, so continue with the behaviour anyway. And those watching the cameras may not realise anything criminal is going on so can’t do anything to stop the crime.

Some cameras aren’t even monitored, so are only helpful for identification once a crime has been committed.

Myth 3: Putting people in prison stops crime

Prison is a big investment without a great return.

It costs the state approximately $200 a day to incarcerate an adult in NSW, while it costs nearly $1,000 a day to incarcerate a juvenile. It’s further reported that nearly half of those leaving prison today in NSW will return to prison within two years.

Myth 4: All crimes are reported equally

For those crimes that people need to report for insurance reasons, such as car theft or house break ins, we know the statistics are fairly accurate—not much goes unreported. Unfortunately, the opposite is true for sexual assault and domestic violence. This means that the recent rise in those crimes is only telling part of the story.

Listen to Dr Garner Clancey on SoundCloud, subscribe on iTunes.

Christopher Pepin-Neff is a lecturer in Public Policy in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. His research interests include theories of the policy process, policy analysis, the role of policy entrepreneurs, and comparative public policy.

About the University of Sydney Law School Juris Doctor

The Sydney Law School is Australia’s first. Since its inception, it has been at the forefront of developments associated with both the teaching and research of law. Its strong sense of commitment to the fundamentals of law is combined with a commitment to innovation and the exploration of issues at the cutting edge.

The Sydney JD comprises the core legal subjects required throughout the world for professional accreditation coupled with the study of a wide range of elective subjects which allows advanced learning in both specialized fields and law in general. Teaching and learning methodology includes a wide range of formats to allow individual choice, a deep understanding of the law, independent research and the development of the skills and ethics inherent in modern professional practice.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 3 years
Semester intake: March
Application deadline: Candidates are strongly encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply now to Sydney Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Sydney Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Monash to become first 100 percent renewable energy powered university in Australia

By the year 2030, Monash University expects all of the energy used on its campuses will be clean and renewable.

Monash to become Australia's first 100 per cent renewable energy powered university

Solar panels at Clayton campus (Photo: Monash University)

The university is investing $135 million to achieve its aim with a project called Net Zero.

Monash University President and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Margaret Gardner AO, said the Net Zero initiative was the most ambitious project of its kind undertaken by an Australian university.

“Leadership in sustainability, of the kind to which Monash aspires requires much more than being carbon neutral by offsetting emissions through carbon credits or similar mechanisms. The university strives to completely eliminate its dependence on fossil fuels,” Professor Gardner said.

“Monash is actively reducing its emissions and, by transforming our energy infrastructure and following a deep decarbonisation strategy, ensuring that all the energy we use on our campuses is clean.”

As well as committing to net zero carbon emissions from their Australian campuses, all of Monash’s operations will also be carbon neutral by 2030.

Residual emissions from operations—such as plane travel—will be offset by purchasing certified and socially conscious carbon offset programs.

“Clean affordable and reliable energy is something that we all want. This target is about putting our world-leading research and campuses to work to show that a 100-percent renewable future is not only possible, but good for business and the planet too,” said Monash Engineering and Sustainability Manager Dr Rob Brimblecombe.

Net Zero is not an overnight revolution. Monash has been greening itself for some time, beginning in 2005 when the university began measuring its performance in emissions, energy use, waste, water and transport. It then set an energy reduction target of 20 percent based on those early measurements.

In 2010 the first solar panels went in on each campus.

Now there are more than 4,000 panels in place, enough to power 100 average Australian households.

Building is now underway at the Clayton campus for an on-site microgrid that will help the university control when and how energy is used.

The Monash microgrid will be connected to the Victorian energy grid, which in the future can reduce the demand and strain on the network during peak times.

The state government, through the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), contributed $100,000 seed funding for the Monash Microgrid.

The Net Zero Initiative is set to directly benefit research at the university, which is building the microgrid to model and assess the performance of energy network systems.

“The Monash Microgrid will provide a real-world example demonstrating how communities can keep their energy system affordable and resilient, in particular during peak periods and extreme weather events,” said Director of the Monash Energy Materials and Systems Institute, Dr Jacek Jasieniak.

“We’re using our campuses and research to develop scalable clean energy solutions that can be tested here and deployed around the world,” Dr Jasieniak said.

By the end of 2020, the university will complete its biggest solar roll out. By then, it will be generating 7 GWh of energy, the equivalent of powering 1,000 homes in Victoria for a year.

The project supports the concept of Monash as a living lab, with research and teaching linked to operational sustainability.

Monash University is also eliminating gas and moving to 100 percent electricity.

“By 2030 all of our energy consumption will be electric and from renewable sources,” Professor Gardner said.

The university is also reducing the overall energy consumption of their operations. This includes updating all of their campus lighting to LED, ensuring sustainability certification of all new buildings, and only investing in appliances and equipment that are energy efficient.

Monash University is asking

  • How do you make Australia’s economy carbon neutral?
  • How do we solve the water crisis?
  • What does a sustainable city look like?

While the researchers, educators, partners and funders may speak different “languages” (science, the arts, engineering and policy for example) they are working together to achieve a common purpose.

The Monash Sustainability Institute programs and initiatives investigate how to build water-sensitive cities and better manage water resources. They are catalysing action across Australia’s economy to reduce greenhouse emissions and valuing and integrating indigenous knowledge to help manage natural resources, putting environmental sustainability at the centre of decision making. Monash is understanding and influencing human behaviour, training and educating the next generation of leaders in sustainability, and much more.

Apply to a Monash Environmental Sciences Program!

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Would you like to study sustainability? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com for more information.

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017

Newcastle law students love their new digs at NeW Space

UON’s Faculty of Business and Law and staff moved into the University of Newcastle’s (UON) $95-million NeW Space facility city in July. So far, the NeW Space facility has received rave reviews from students and the community… and some comedic ones—just have a peek at that video!

Newcastle law students love their new digs at NewSpace

Find out more about Newcastle Law School

NeW Space delivers new academic and research programs in business, law and emerging fields including creative industries, innovation and entrepreneurship. The new campus will also play an important role in connecting the university with business, industry and community partners in Newcastle and the Hunter.

The new precinct is a significant revitalisation project for the City of Newcastle and hosts a range of university-supported activities including

  • business and law programs;
  • digital library services and information commons;
  • collaborative learning and research spaces;
  • facilities for engagement with industry, business and the community;
  • social learning spaces.

Newcastle Law School also moved to the university’s landmark education precinct. JD students are currently enjoying the highest quality social learning spaces, digital library services and information commons, collaborative learning and research spaces, and facilities for engagement with industry, business and the community.

Newcastle Law School Webinar

Think you may be interested in studying law at the University of Newcastle, but would like more particulars about the program and about how you can come back to Canada to practice? OzTREKK and a Newcastle Law School graduate (and former OzTREKK student!) David Lotimer will be hosting a webinar for anyone interested in studying law in Australia. Join us to learn more about studying law in Australia!

Guest: Meet law graduate David Lotimer
Date: October 12, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (EDT); 4 p.m. (PDT)

Don’t forget to RSVP for this event.

Newcastle Law School Juris Doctor Program

The University of Newcastle is now offering two intakes per year for the Juris Doctor / Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice program.

Program: Juris Doctor / Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice
Location: Newcastle (Callaghan)
Duration: 3 years
Next intakes: Jan/Feb and June 2018
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged apply at least three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements

Entry to the program is available to students that have successfully completed a 3-year bachelor degree in any discipline other than law, from a recognized institution; or other post-secondary qualification from a recognized institution assessed by the Faculty Pro Vice-Chancellor to be equivalent. Applicants must also meet the English Language requirements of the university.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Law School!

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Do you have any questions about studying at Newcastle Law School? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, October 6th, 2017

University of Melbourne physiotherapy students use augmented reality

From Pokémon GO to the classroom—how a collaboration between the University of Melbourne and Microsoft in AR is taking students under the skin of their patients.

Story by Andrew Trounson, University of Melbourne

Pokémon GO pushed augmented reality, or AR, into the mainstream, sending 500 million people around the world chasing cartoon characters on their phones. But now, in a unique multi-disciplinary collaboration, it’s making the leap from entertainment to education.

A new fusion of augmented reality, gaming technology, and anatomy is giving physiotherapy students at the University of Melbourne access to cutting-edge technology to take a look inside the human body by projecting different layers of muscles and bones over the top of a volunteer “patient.” It provides an inside view of how the body works as it moves in real time.

Melbourne physiotherapy students use augmented reality

Learn more about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

The technology, called the Augmented Studio, is designed to radically enhance the teaching of physiotherapy where students currently use their knowledge of anatomy to understand how muscles work beneath the skin of a patient because they can’t see through them. But the Augmented Studio, developed by researchers at the University of Melbourne, bridges the gap between that theory and practice.

By using tracking sensors mounted on a scaffold it projects images of our muscles and skeleton directly onto a volunteer. The images automatically follow the shape and movement of the body, giving students in the studio space an interactive all-round view of how our bodies work. It can even allow them and their teachers to “draw” on the projected image to make information and action more explicit.

“What we are doing is overlaying virtual models of what we look like underneath our skin and synchronising that with real human action,” says Dr Thuong Hoang, who is a Research Fellow at the Microsoft Research Centre for Social Natural Users Interfaces at the University of Melbourne.

The Augmented Studio was built by Dr Hoang, computer engineer Zaher Joukhadar and Phd student Martin Reinoso, who adapted Microsoft’s Kinect body sensing and tracking device as well as “RoomAlive” projection technology, both of which were originally designed for computer gaming. Once a person steps into the projection space and forms a T-shape with their arms outstretched, the trackers lock on to them and the projected image conforms to their shape and movement.

At the moment the projected overlay doesn’t show how our muscles actually move when we contract and relax our muscles. Instead, it tracks the body and movement at the joints. But eventually Dr Hoang wants to add in animation that can show the actual movement of muscles as the model moves.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy lecturer Dr David Kelly says the students quickly embraced the technology during pilot sessions in 2016, which are continuing in 2017. He says the combination of live movement and interaction, in which students could actually move and feel the model’s limbs, helps them to grasp the relationship between their learned anatomy and how it works dynamically.

“For first-year students it can be really hard to bring together anatomical knowledge with how the body actually works because it can be difficult to visualise. But when they see a real person who they can interact with, while also seeing the muscles and skeleton projected over the top, combined with the ability to draw and write on the body, it all becomes much easier for the students to learn about how the body moves,” says Dr Kelly, from the Melbourne School of Health Sciences.

The Augmented Studio also provides a more visual and intuitive way of learning that Dr Kelly says will benefit those students who naturally learn more easily by direct visualisation, rather than through reading and listening. “There has always been a group of students that struggle because the limited ways in which we have to teach may not conform to how they learn best,” he says.

Developments in AR, which seeks to use technology to enhance what we can already see, hear and feel in the real world, are far ahead of chasing GPS tracked Pokémon. There are viewing devices such as glasses that can overlay what we see with three-dimensional graphics, video and holograms, and we can generate projections like games that people manipulate by moving our hands.

The big advantage of the Augmented Studio over advances like 3D holograms is that the students can actually touch and move the body, making it a much more interactive experience. They also don’t have to wear headgear, which means it could potentially be used in bigger settings with larger numbers of students.

“It has always been hard to capture the dynamic side of how our anatomy works, so the difference here is the high level of interaction you can achieve. The student can, for example, ask the model to kick and they can then look at variations from different angles at what is happening as someone kicks,” Dr Kelly says.

The Augmented Studio is still in early-stage development and Dr Kelly would love to see it migrate to using muscle animations. Dr Hoang is also working to develop a system for the student interaction with the model to be automatically recorded onto their tablets so they can have a permanent record of what they were learning.

Another challenge is to find a way to make the studio more transportable and quicker to set up. At the moment the studio can work very effectively in a dedicated tutorial space where it could be permanently set up, but Dr Kelly says a more portable set up would increase its flexibility for teaching.

The Augmented Studio is an extension of Dr Hoang’s earlier work exploring how virtual reality and body tracking could be used to help guide body movement for dance and marital arts students. Arising from a collaboration between the physiotherapy department’s Teaching and Learning director, Associate Professor Louisa Remedios and Professor Frank Vetere, Director of Microsoft Social NUI, Dr Hoang started working with the physiotherapy department on developing a teaching aid. He then realised that virtual reality, in which you are immersed in an entirely created world, wasn’t suited to teaching physiotherapy that is very hands on.

“When we got into the class rooms we had to change our thinking. VR just wouldn’t work in the tactile environment in which they learn and practice,” Dr Hoang says. It was when he noticed that students kept referring back to anatomy charts when they were practicing on each other that he started thinking of using augmented reality to put the virtual muscles on the body

Dr Hoang is now working on extending the tracked projection technology to various health and fitness areas, and even in performance art. He says that using tracking sensors with projections it is possible to create guides that show people how to position their bodies for practicing fitness, sport and dance.

Using virtual reality headsets he and PhD student Martin Reinoso have already developed a prototype that allows a martial arts teacher to remotely instruct students on the right position to hold. By using body tracking and linked headsets student can match their movement to align with those of their teacher. There is also scope to project information on our own body’s performance, such as heart rate and breathing, so it is visible either on our projected selves or on a nearby surface.

“The innovation we have created isn’t just limited to the fixed information that we have been projecting so far. If can be used to project dynamic information onto yourself or any surface around you,” Dr Hoang says. “All of what I’m dreaming of is very possible.”

About the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

Eligible University of Melbourne Physiotherapy candidates for admission will have completed undergraduate studies in human anatomy and human physiology at the university level. Other subjects which may be helpful for physiotherapy applicants include psychology, physics, biomechanics, research methods, evidence-based practice, statistics, biochemistry, and additional units of anatomy.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Next available intake: February 2019
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2018 intake, the application rounds closed June 1 and July 27, 2017.

Apply to the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy Program!

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Would you like to learn more about the University of Melbourne Physiotherapy program ? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Friday, September 22nd, 2017

Have a degree? You can get your pharmacy degree in just two years!

Pharmacy degrees are great: you finish high school and then move directly to your professional four-year degree. Another bonus: Australian Bachelor of Pharmacy degrees are recognized internationally, so if you intend to practice in Canada, you would first apply for certification through your provincial regulatory body. Many OzTREKK students have followed this path and are now practicing pharmacists in Canada.

Have a degree? You can get your pharmacy degree in just two years!

Get your pharmacy degree in just two years at Monash Pharmacy

Introducing graduate-entry pharmacy at Monash University

If you hold a relevant degree, you may be able to enter into the third year of the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours), receiving credit for much of the first two years of the program. That means you’ll finish your degree in two years.

What will you study?

If you enter the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) via the graduate-entry pathway, you will complete a pass/fail unit that runs just over four weeks and must be passed in order to receive credit for the first two years of the degree. The unit is run in the summer semester (January – February). Upon successfully completing the summer unit, you will then enter the third year of the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)!

Entry requirements

You will be eligible for the graduate-entry program if you have a minimum average of 70% (distinction or equivalent) and have graduated from a relevant degree in the last 10 years. Relevant degrees include

  • Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Biomedicine/ Bachelor of Health Sciences;
  • Bachelor of Pharmaceutical Sciences;
  • Bachelor of Science with subject completions in chemistry, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology and mathematics.

If you’ve graduated with a Bachelor of Science, Monash will take into account the number of relevant subjects you’ve completed:

  • chemistry
  • physiology
  • biochemistry
  • pharmacology
  • mathematics

The units completed in the degree should be relevant and science-based. If a number of electives have been completed in arts, for instance, there may not be enough relevancy for consideration.

January 2018 will be the last intake for the graduate-entry Bachelor of Pharmacy (Hons) program. From 2019, Monash will be offering a graduate-entry pathway into the new three-year Bachelor of Pharmacy(Hons) / Master of Pharmacy program. This degree combo will allow students to graduate with both a bachelor and a master in only 3 years. See the video for more info:

About the Monash University Bachelor of Pharmacy (Hons) Program

Monash’s Bachelor of Pharmacy (Hons) program produces graduates with a sound knowledge and understanding of the science, technology and practice behind pharmacy as a profession. Monash Pharmacy is ranked #2 in the world and #1 in Australia according to QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

Receive a $4,000 relocation grant. The university offers a grant to all international students who study pharmacy at Monash!

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (Hons)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: January 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged by to submit their applications as early as possible.

Apply to the Monash University Pharmacy School!

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Discover more about the graduate-entry Monash pharmacy degree. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

What’s so great about the Macquarie University Hospital?

Just three weeks ago we announced the new Doctor of Medicine program being offered at Macquarie University. The addition of the Macquarie MD now means that OzTREKK students now have eight medical programs to choose from!

What's so great about the Macquarie University Hospital?

Macquarie University Hospital is the only Australian private teaching hospital linked to a university (Image: Macquarie)

The Macquarie MD aims to provide students with a high-quality and innovative learning experience. With a small annual intake of 60 (40 domestic and 20 international), students will have access to impressive facilities and medical educators, researchers and clinicians.

What’s so great about the Macquarie University Hospital?

A hospital is a hospital, right? Well, not quite. Let us explain.

Along with the amazing—and paid for—clinical year in Hyderabad, India, MD students will also spend much of their time at the Macquarie University Hospital, which is Australia’s most technologically advanced private hospital on a university campus. The hospital is co-located with the Australian School of Advanced Medicine and also houses medical services for students and staff. The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Macquarie University is the fifth and newest faculty formed in 2014. It is also the only medical faculty in Australia to be linked to a not-for-profit private teaching hospital on its campus.

Macquarie University Hospital is a new, world-class medical facility revolutionising the Australian medical scene. With 187 beds, 16 operating theatres and state of the art equipment, Macquarie University Hospital attracts the best medical personnel and delivers an exceptional level of patient care.

Clinical programs include

Macquarie University Hospital is progressive hospital in which doctors and staff focus on providing care of the highest quality to every patient, and on leveraging technology in the pursuit of patient care, research and training.

 

Purpose of Macquarie University Hospital

To heal – At Macquarie University Hospital, leading doctors and nurses work together to provide the highest quality care using the latest medical technology. With 152 beds, 12 operating theatres and clinics in radiology, pathology, radiotherapy and oncology, the hospital provides services across a broad range of specialties.

To learn – Expert doctors at Macquarie University Hospital not only deliver the best care to patients, but also educate other doctors, passing on their valuable knowledge and experience. Many leading specialists teach at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, which is located next to the hospital and facilitates the learning of the next generation of specialists—MD and DPT students!

To discover – Medical treatments are constantly evolving. Macquarie University Hospital staff are committed to a process of improvement and advancement. Macquarie doctors not only use and teach the latest medical and surgical techniques, but also conduct research to discover better therapies, so that they can continue to deliver the most effective treatments. To do this, Macquarie University Hospital and the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences work together to conduct research into best clinical practice. Much of their research is based on the concept of “translational research,” a process of adapting scientific discoveries to become practical improvements in patient care at the bedside.

Macquarie University Doctor of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: North Ryde, Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 4 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: October 5, 2017

Apply to the Macquarie University Doctor of Medicine!

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Find out more about the Doctor of Medicine program at Macquarie University! Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, August 28th, 2017

What is the UQ Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence?

The Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence is a state-of-the-art, purpose-built facility, and home to UQ Pharmacy in Brisbane, Queensland.

What is the UQ Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence?

Study at the UQ Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence

The PACE concept was jointly developed by the university and the whole profession in 2000, and creates a leading facility for pharmaceutical research, education and commercialisation. PACE aims to create a new and unique health and medical precinct, with particular focus on pharmacy and pharmaceutical science.

The project has the support of the Queensland State Government, which has donated land for the project on a site adjoining the Princess Alexandra Hospital.

What’s at PACE?

  • UQ School of Pharmacy
  • The Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA), Queensland Branch
  • UQ Library branch
  • 360-seat lecture theatre
  • UQ Healthcare Clinic
  • Pacemaker Cafe

Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence – benefits for students studying at UQ Pharmacy

Former OzTREKK student and UQ Pharmacy graduate Fatima Benhabib has nothing but praise for the Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence: “PACE is an outstanding facility for students. The academic staff are all top in their areas of expertise and have a wealth of information for students who are curious to learn more.

“In addition, the library and interactive learning area are great spaces for study and became a second home for me during exam block. There are many opportunities outside of academics to gain experience and develop a network of contacts for those students who are keen.”

Let’s tour PACE

UQ Pharmacy – Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29; however, late applications may be accepted

Entry Requirements

Applicants to UQ Pharmacy are required to have completed their high school diploma. Applicants should have completed Grade 12 English, chemistry and math to meet program prerequisites.

If you have commenced or completed a university degree or any post-secondary studies, your most recent studies will be assessed in terms of your grades. If you have not completed the necessary prerequisite subjects in your post-secondary studies, your high school transcripts will then be assessed for prerequisite subjects.

Credit Transfers

Many international students with prior study (especially those with a science background) are able to enter directly into Year 2 of the Bachelor of Pharmacy. If credit is awarded, students can undertake an additional course in their first and second semester of enrollment and complete the program in just 3 years.

Apply to UQ Pharmacy School!

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For more information about UQ Pharmacy, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

UQ Veterinary School earns top marks in global ranking system

The University of Queensland has been ranked the best in Australia for veterinary sciences by a major international rankings system.

UQ Vet School earns top marks in global ranking system

Study at UQ Vet School (Photo credit: UQ)

Acting Head of the UQ School of Veterinary Science Associate Professor Jenny Seddon welcomed the latest school accolade in the ShanghaiRanking Global Ranking of Academic Subjects for 2017.

“The school has a sustained record of excellence in research and teaching across the veterinary disciplines since our first student intake 81 years ago,” she said.

“In addition to providing world-class veterinary education, our diverse group of academic and clinical staff contribute to animal science, health and welfare through innovative, practical research, advanced veterinary services and successful industry partnerships.”

Associate Professor Seddon said as well as being the top-ranked Australian university in veterinary sciences, The University of Queensland was also ranked globally in the world’s top 25 for veterinary sciences—at ranking 24—in the prestigious subject rankings.

She said prospective students could be confident in the quality of their programs, with the five-year Bachelor of Veterinary Science degree being globally accredited by three major accrediting bodies in Australia/NZ (AVBC), UK (RCVS) and North America (AVMA).

UQ is also a leader both nationally and internationally in the emerging profession of veterinary technology, offering a three-year Bachelor of Veterinary Technology degree which combines theory, practical instruction and hands-on experience.

With more than $140 million invested in purpose-built teaching and research facilities at UQ’s Gatton campus, students and research staff access an integrated site for animal production, health and welfare teaching and research activities set on 1,000 hectares of rural land.

UQ Veterinary School

Since its first intake of students in 1936, the UQ Veterinary School has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours) provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 29; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, July 17th, 2017

5 inside tips about studying nursing at the University of Sydney

First-year Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) student Mackenzie O’Toole agreed to answer 15 questions about studying nursing at the University of Sydney, including why she chose it, what she likes about it, and what surprised her most about university life.

5 reasons to study nursing at the University of Sydney

University of Sydney Nursing School

Here, Mackenzie discusses the five things she enjoys about studying nursing at the University of Sydney. To check out the full list, watch the video below, “15 questions with nursing student Mackenzie O’Toole.”

1. Where is the best spot at Sydney Nursing School?

Mackenzie’s favourite spot at Sydney Nursing School are the clinical simulation labs (SIM labs). The SIM labs are home to full-body manikins installed with the latest simulation technology. They provide a safe environment where students like Mackenzie can practice and improve their clinical skills while developing their confidence in the procedures they are learning in lectures.

Through simulated learning, students become proficient at

  • taking blood pressure
  • checking a pulse
  • listening to breath
  • heart and bowel sounds
  • dressing wounds
  • preparing and administering medications
  • conducting interviews, and
  • documenting patient information.

2. Why she chose a nursing degree

When asked why she chose a nursing degree, Mackenzie’s main reason was “to help others in need.” Nurses make a genuine difference to people’s lives. Mackenzie was also inspired by the nursing care she received when she contracted meningitis at just three months of age, an event that left her with hearing loss in one ear. Her passion for helping others grew from that point on. She wanted to treat others with the same care she had received.

3. How quickly she was able to undertake a placement

Mackenzie was amazed by how soon into her degree she was able to gain real-world experience in her placement. She was placed at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, which is located only blocks away from the university campus.

From the first year of the Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) degree, students gain invaluable practical experience through 880 hours of clinical placements across a wide variety of healthcare settings including emergency departments, intensive care units, paediatric units, mental health facilities and community health centres. Students also have the opportunity to undertake a clinical placement overseas.

4. How supportive her lecturers have been

Sydney Nursing School offers students a supportive environment in which to learn. They are taught by leading academics, clinicians and researchers who are part of the nursing and healthcare community. Mackenzie found her lecturers to be “amazingly supportive.”

Helping students from day one through to graduation, the University of Sydney has a network of services, facilities and experts to make university experience as smooth and rewarding as possible.

5. How much she loves working with different people

As highly trained and valued professionals, nurses work with a diverse range of people, including other healthcare professionals and patients from all walks of life. Mackenzie has loved how she has been able to study and work alongside people from a diverse range of backgrounds from around Australia and the world.

Students learn how to thrive in complex health environments and will build an understanding of how to work with other health professionals to provide the highest quality patient-centered care.

Study Nursing at the University of Sydney

Sydney Nursing School has been ranked number one in Australia for research and educational excellence in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject. Currently, the University of Sydney is ranked 9th in the world for nursing, according the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

Program: Master of Nursing 
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Intake: March 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: International applications are managed in rounds: Round 1 – May 25, 2017; Round 2 – August 17, 2017; Round 3 – October 6 2017

Apply to the University of Sydney Nursing School!

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Find out more about the programs offered at Sydney Nursing School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

University of Sydney researchers are working on turning waste into new innovations for the health, agriculture, transport and construction industries. Here’s how:

1. Orange peel: a cure for cancer?

Every year around a third of food produced for human consumption is never eaten. That’s around 1.3 billion tonnes of food that is wasted. But University of Sydney research is breathing new life into these leftovers and using them to make people healthier.

From orange peel to malformed mushrooms, a lot of food waste is rich in nutrients that are vital for people’s well-being and can be used in our diet. Professor Fariba Dehghani is one of the scientists turning these scraps into life-saving medicine.

Professor Dehghani explains how her team is using waste in a meaningful way in a video, below, produced in association with the Sydney Morning Herald.

2. Seabed delicacy: a cold sore treatment?

Did you know the blue blood of abalone could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus?

A team of chemical engineers and virologists at the University of Sydney found that the sea snail’s anti-viral properties could block the herpes virus’s entry into cells.

3. Turning algae into renewable jet fuel

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

Turning algae into jet fuel (Photo: University of Sydney)

A native freshwater algae grown in northern Australia can be used to create a high-quality, renewable jet fuel. A multi-disciplinary team including researchers from the University of Sydney, James Cook University and Israel’s Ben Gurion University has developed a proof-of-concept process to create high-quality renewable biofuel from the macroalgae, Oedogonium, ready for blending with regular gasoline, jet fuel and diesel.

4. Pee on the pods

Urine could be successfully recycled to fertilise crops, according to university researchers. A team from the University of Sydney School of Civil Engineering has examined the effectiveness of reusing nutrients from human waste and say there is growing evidence that the use of human urine in agriculture is completely viable.

5. A concrete idea for reusing industrial waste

The university’s School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is investigating new technologies for the sustainable processing of industrial waste and by-products. One example of this could see fly ash—a byproduct of coal combustion—used as a supplement in concrete mix and its manufacture.

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Would you like more information about studying civil engineering or environmental sciences at the University of Sydney? Email OzTREKK Admissions Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!