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Articles categorized as ‘Research Programs at Australian Universities’

Monday, November 13th, 2017

JCU researchers look at innovative ways to solve the GP shortage in the bush

Researchers from the JCU College of Medicine and Dentistry have been awarded $150,000 to investigate how best to address the GP shortage in the bush.

“For decades, rural and remote regions across north and western Queensland have struggled to attract and retain specialist GPs,” said Professor Tarun Sen Gupta, Director of Medical Education at JCU.

JCU researchers looking at innovative ways to solve the GP shortage in the bush

JCU medicine graduates are uniquely qualified to work in rural and remote areas

“James Cook University is working to address the crisis through its specialist GP training program to build a rural, regional and remote health workforce for the most underserved regions across the state,” Professor Sen Gupta said.

The JCU team is working in partnership with researchers from the Monash University School of Rural Health.

The funding will enable the research team to determine where the GP shortage is greatest, and how best to ensure specialist GP training places can be established to meet the demand.

They’ll also identify innovative training and supervision models to increase the delivery of high quality GP registrar training in underserved communities.

“We aim to identify the challenges and opportunities associated with developing and strengthening the provision of high-quality training in areas of greatest need, and to increase rural workforce recruitment and retention,” said lead researcher, Associate Professor Carole Reeve from JCU’s specialist GP training program, GMT.

“Results from the study will assist JCU’s Generalist Medical Training (GMT) program to work with communities and practices to strengthen health care in underserved north and west Queensland communities,” Associate Professor Carole Reeve said.

Professor Sen Gupta said there’s strong evidence that JCU medical graduates are practicing in regional and rural locations in a very different pattern of distribution to that of other medical schools.

“JCU’s GMT program has enhanced this by training registrars in rural and remote locations, where many remain after completing training,” Professor Sen Gupta said.

“This study will help better understand where the need is greatest, and how we can recruit graduates to train and work in the most underserved communities.”

About GMT

Generalist Medical Training is James Cook University’s specialist training program within the College of Medicine and Dentistry. This program has been contracted by the Australian Government Department of Health to deliver Australian General Practice training (AGPT) in North Western Queensland. The AGPT program is a vocational training program for medical graduates (registrars) who are pursuing a career in the specialty of General Practice.

About the JCU Medical Program

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next available intake: February 2019
Duration: 6 years

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Discover more about JCU and its medicine program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com.

Friday, August 25th, 2017

Monash research team trials virtual reality to help children during medical procedures

Needle procedures, including intravenous cannulas and blood tests, can be extremely distressing for many children and can lead to lifelong anxiety.

Monash University and Monash Children’s Hospital researchers are conducting the world’s largest study of virtual reality headsets to improve the experience of children undergoing needle procedures.

Monash research team trialling virtual reality to help children during medical procedures

Dr Evelyn Chan, patient Nia Ashton and Dr Erin Mills (Photo: Monash University)

For the first time, a collaborative research team led by Monash University Research Fellow Dr Evelyn Chan, is investigating the use of virtual reality (VR) headsets to reduce fear, pain and anxiety associated with these procedures.

Dr Chan said current pain management techniques such as local anaesthetic cream or distraction were inadequate for some children, and may result in the need for restraints and/or sedation.

“The VR headsets distract children, allowing them to experience and interact with animated sea-life, including fish, dolphins and whales, while medical staff take blood or insert an intravenous cannula,” Dr Chan said.

The VR animations have been created to perfectly coincide with the procedures being carried out.

“Children ‘feel’ the water while a nurse or doctor prepares and cleans their hand, and fish gently bite at their hand while a needle is inserted,” Dr Chan said.

Principal Investigator at Monash Children’s Hospital, Dr Erin Mills, said VR allowed children to be transported into an engaging and interactive 3D ‘virtual world’ which provided an escape from the real world where the procedure was being performed.

“The virtual reality experience has been designed to be immersive, enjoyable and help relax and reassure the child while medical procedures are taking place,” Dr Mills said.

Dr Chan said their vision was for every child to have access to high quality needle pain management, anytime, anywhere—whether they were in a world-class kid’s hospital, a busy pathology clinic, or a remote GP practice.

“VR has huge potential to transform patient experiences. One day VR might become a cornerstone of patient care—helping support patients in every step of their health journey, from being able to walk through the operating room before their surgery, to supporting them through their hospital stay, and helping them during recovery with rehab and preventive health activities,” Dr Chan said.

Two-hundred-forty patients from the Pathology and the Emergency Departments at Monash Children’s Hospital are currently being recruited to the study. The Royal Children’s Hospital will open an arm of the study next month.

More than 30,000 patients presented to Monash Children’s Hospital Emergency Department in the last 12 months, with 4,500 requiring blood tests.

The Monash research team includes Dr Erin Mills, Associate Professor Simon Craig, Dr Simon Cohen, Emma Ramage, Samantha Foster, Ryan Sambell, Michael Hovenden, Dr Evelyn Chan, and Dr Paul Leong.

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Learn more about the new medical degree at Monash Medical School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Team at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

Dentistry research at the front line of tobacco intervention

Dentistry research is at the front line of tobacco intervention

Sydney Dental School

Learn more about Sydney Dental School

Smoking is a primary risk factor for periodontal disease and oral cancer and is one of the leading preventable causes of death. Healthcare providers have access to evidence-based guidelines that can help patients quit smoking; however, the translation of that knowledge and adoption into daily practice remains low. Healthcare providers are missing opportunities to address tobacco-use with their patients due to limited time and lack of health behaviour change expertise.

Concerns around how best to manage patients’ tobacco-use are raised in dental settings across the world. Innovative strategies are emerging in the behavioural sciences area; however, screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRTs) methods can be difficult to apply to the individual patients.

How is dentistry research at the University of Sydney addressing this issue?

Professor Heiko Spallek, Pro-Dean of Dentistry at the University of Sydney  and Dr Brad Rindal, Associate Dental Director for Research at HealthPartners Institute, Minnesota are conducting a clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) to improve dental provider delivery of SBIRTs.

What does the clinical trial involve?

The overarching goal of this research is to reduce smoking-associated morbidity and mortality by increasing the number of dental patients who are referred for tobacco cessation counseling. This program aims to

  • evaluate the effectiveness of clinical decision support (CDS) and,
  • improve dental provider delivery of brief tobacco interventions and referrals to tobacco quitlines for further tobacco counseling.

In this research, the CDS is being integrated within two commonly used electronic dental record systems and will generate personalised evidence-based recommendations for dental providers. These records will help dental professionals to actively engage with patients who smoke as part of the course of usual dental care.

The tobacco CDS will be tested within two dental schools, the School of Dental Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and the Indiana University School of Dentistry as well as sixteen private-practice clinics. The research project is funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research for over two million US dollars.

Sydney Dentistry’s Doctor of Dental Medicine

The Sydney Dental School’s DMD is a graduate-entry program that has been purposefully designed to adhere to the well-rounded course structure of the North American postgraduate model, but has also maintained the sophisticated clinical training for which the University of Sydney has come to be renowned, giving students an applicable knowledge of dental health from the community to the laboratory.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales (Camperdown/Darlington campus)
Semester intake: February each year
Duration: 4 years

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Are you interested in dentistry at the University of Sydney ? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com for more information!

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

University of Sydney researchers are working on turning waste into new innovations for the health, agriculture, transport and construction industries. Here’s how:

1. Orange peel: a cure for cancer?

Every year around a third of food produced for human consumption is never eaten. That’s around 1.3 billion tonnes of food that is wasted. But University of Sydney research is breathing new life into these leftovers and using them to make people healthier.

From orange peel to malformed mushrooms, a lot of food waste is rich in nutrients that are vital for people’s well-being and can be used in our diet. Professor Fariba Dehghani is one of the scientists turning these scraps into life-saving medicine.

Professor Dehghani explains how her team is using waste in a meaningful way in a video, below, produced in association with the Sydney Morning Herald.

2. Seabed delicacy: a cold sore treatment?

Did you know the blue blood of abalone could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus?

A team of chemical engineers and virologists at the University of Sydney found that the sea snail’s anti-viral properties could block the herpes virus’s entry into cells.

3. Turning algae into renewable jet fuel

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

Turning algae into jet fuel (Photo: University of Sydney)

A native freshwater algae grown in northern Australia can be used to create a high-quality, renewable jet fuel. A multi-disciplinary team including researchers from the University of Sydney, James Cook University and Israel’s Ben Gurion University has developed a proof-of-concept process to create high-quality renewable biofuel from the macroalgae, Oedogonium, ready for blending with regular gasoline, jet fuel and diesel.

4. Pee on the pods

Urine could be successfully recycled to fertilise crops, according to university researchers. A team from the University of Sydney School of Civil Engineering has examined the effectiveness of reusing nutrients from human waste and say there is growing evidence that the use of human urine in agriculture is completely viable.

5. A concrete idea for reusing industrial waste

The university’s School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is investigating new technologies for the sustainable processing of industrial waste and by-products. One example of this could see fly ash—a byproduct of coal combustion—used as a supplement in concrete mix and its manufacture.

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Would you like more information about studying civil engineering or environmental sciences at the University of Sydney? Email OzTREKK Admissions Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

What do your music preferences say about your study habits?

It’s well known that certain human behaviours such as eating, having sex or shared social moments lead to a release of the neurotransmitter dopamine.

“Dopamine is a very common neurotransmitter, sometimes called a feel-good neurochemical. More accurately, it is released in response to a rewarding activity, and its presence helps drive our motivation and reinforces the activity that led to its release,” says University of Sydney Professor Alais.

What do your music preferences say about your study habits?

What you listen to may affect how you study

Now music can be added to the list, since it’s been found that listening to emotionally engaging melodies also results in the release of dopamine—one of few intangible practices to do this.

Prof Alais discussed a behavioural study on rats to demonstrate the relationship between dopamine and motivation.

“Given two pathways to find a food reward, rats with high dopamine levels took the effortful path to receive twice the amount of food, while those with low levels took the easy path and received less food,” he says.

So, how does this relate to studying?

“When you are sitting down to study, boosting dopamine through music is good because it will increase your motivation levels. The satisfaction you feel when reaching your study goals will be intrinsically rewarding and reinforce your willingness to study,” Prof Alais explains.

“For the maximum dopamine boost, you should choose music that gives you a positive emotional response,” he suggests. “People who are happy and less stressed are going to feel better and therefore learn better.”

Certain music can boost memory

In neuroscience there are several networks in the brain including the executive attention network and the default mode network, the latter being more active when you are calm and inwardly focused.

“In this reflective state you are more likely to imagine and visualise things; you can find connections between information and memories. You are less focused on logical sequences and instead on broader associative connections that can help you encode things in a richer network.”

And visualisation is apparently the best way to memorise things.

Alais gives the example of how famous Roman orators from times before cue cards harnessed the power of visualisation to recite their extraordinarily lengthy public speeches utilising the default mode network of their brain.

“They would model the sequence of their speech off their house which they knew backwards. They would use this to create an order for their talk and in each room of the house they would mentally input a couple of object cues,” the University of Sydney professor explains.

“They only had to remember the sequence of their speech in global terms (e.g., the route they would take to walk around their house) and the rest of the information would flow on from there.

“The imagination is a powerful tool and it’s one that we don’t use enough.”

In order to reach this part of the brain Alais suggests we need to remove extraneous stimuli.

“In order to switch off your externally focused frontal lobe and achieve a more reflective headspace you can meditate, practice mindfulness, take a walk or listen to calming, ambient music.”

Music with lyrics and complex technical sequences is more distracting, making it harder to reach this reflective inner state as you will be focused on outside factors.

“You can’t ignore someone speaking to you, even through song; so often the logical part of your brain that you’re trying to use when you’re studying is conflicted. You’re detracting from your focus.”

Alais suggests avoiding music with lyrics or that compels you to move physically, “choose music that flows over you rather than grabbing you.”

Work over twerk, if you will.

Tunes can be even more distracting if you have a background in music, something Professor Alais can attest to having worked for six years as a live sound engineer while an undergraduate and PhD student.

“If you are musically trained, you are probably a very analytical listener. You will likely engage more with the music and analyse the rhythm, key, chord changes, instrumentation etc. Something ambient may be better for you to reach that inner default mode network. Or perhaps a genre that is outside your area of expertise.”

What about personality and music preference?

Only a small amount of research exists, but what’s there suggests people can be broadly categorised into three types: empathisers, systemisers and those considered a little bit of both.

Empathisers were found to enjoy pop music because it speaks to the emotions with lyrics and in using rhythm and beat to convey mood. This type of person enjoys the global effect of the music rather than isolating aspects of it. A systemiser, meanwhile, will be more scientific in approach and therefore enjoy complex forms of music like jazz or electronica which requires some effort to decode it.

So as you settle in for another study session, give an extra thought to the tunes you choose because it’s proven that listening to certain music can indeed help you out come exam time. For Professor Alais nothing beats the Bach cello suites.

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Find out how you can study science at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, June 12th, 2017

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

The effect of dog ownership on adult human health is the focus of a new pilot study by the University of Sydney.

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

Do dogs make people feel happy?

Led by Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney School of Public Health, the research team is seeking 100 non-dog owners to participate in the trial—people who are considering owning a dog as well as those who have no interest in doing so.

“Dog ownership is very popular in Australia with over 40 percent of households owning at least one dog,” Associate Professor Stamatakis said. “While anecdotal evidence suggests dog ownership is beneficial for human health, there is currently scant scientific evidence to back up this perception.

“Our research will provide valuable insight into the health benefits of dog ownership which could support programs promoting and enabling dog ownership as a means to increase physical activity, improve general health and prevent cardiovascular and mental illness.”

Differences in physical activity, cardiovascular and metabolic health, and psychosocial well-being will be assessed for three groups: participants who acquire a dog within one month, after an eight-month waiting period, or do not adopt at all.

Over the course of eight months, participants in the Physical & Affective Wellbeing Study of dog owners (PAWS) pilot will be asked to complete a small number of questionnaires over the phone and visit the Charles Perkins Centre or be visited at home three times for some simple physical measurements.

“These initial results will also inform the methods of a much larger trial, the first controlled trial to examine the health effect of ‘real world’ dog ownership,” Associate Professor Stamatakis explained.

What is public health?

Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens. Public health practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and providing programs and services to address these needs. Studying in this field as an international student gives Canadians an understanding of the public health realm on an international scale, making Australia a top choice for Canadians.

At the Sydney School of Public Health, the Master of Public Health program is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, April 21st, 2017

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

James Cook University researchers from the College of Medicine and Dentistry may have found a way to reduce trauma and prevent infections after Caesarean births.

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

L to R: Lisa Davenport, Professor Geoffrey Dobson, Dr Hayley Letson (Photo: JCU)

Caesarean delivery rates are increasing worldwide and around a third of all mothers in Australia, USA and UK give birth surgically each year, but a C-section is not without risks.

Fourth-year JCU Medical School student Lisa Davenport joined Dr Hayley Letson and Professor Geoffrey Dobson from the Heart, Trauma and Sepsis Research Laboratory at JCU to research ways to reduce the stress response to the trauma of surgery.

Caesarean sections involve one or more incisions in a patient’s abdomen, known as a laparotomy, and are a common option for delivering babies.

But they have a raft of potential side-effects, including cutting the baby, post-surgery infection, fever, excessive blood loss or clotting, scar tissue formation and extended stays in hospital.

Dr Letson said a single laparotomy is a major injury.

“It can activate the brain’s stress response from the multiple ‘damage’ signals sent out from the original incision,” she said.

The JCU research showed that a laparotomy causes inflammation and an early activation of the immune system, which can then spiral out of control.

Ms Davenport examined whether an Adenosine, Lidocaine and Magnesium (ALM) drip could reduce the trauma of surgery when used by itself in experimental models. She discovered that adverse responses were reduced when the subject was infused with a small amount of the ALM drip.

“Low volume therapies may be important, because you want to avoid large fluid volumes that can shock the body a second time,” she said.

Professor Dobson said that precisely how tiny volumes of the ALM drip works is an active area of investigation in the Dobson Laboratory, but experiments have shown it protects against infection as well.

Dr Letson said the ALM therapy appears to be linked to improved brain control over whole body function at times of surgical stress. “It suppresses signals that activate immune cells and promote inflammation,” she said.

The work has applications to other major surgery and especially to rural and remote medicine. Professor Dobson said new frontline drugs are urgently required to make major surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon, with the potential to reduce complications and massively reduce health care costs, and possibly reduce waiting times for elective surgery.

“The global surgical statistics are staggering. Of the 234 million major surgeries performed every year, every hour there are around 1,000 deaths and 4,000 major complications, and 50% may be preventable,” he said.

Ms Davenport has completed the study and is currently analysing the data and writing a paper for a high-profile surgical journal.

Her study parallels the Dobson Lab’s ongoing trauma work being supported by the US Military, and a new collaboration that started late 2016 with the National Institutes of Health in the United States.

The research team is also pursuing funding opportunities to investigate the use of ALM fluid as a potential treatment for post-partum haemorrhage. Of the 500,000 maternal deaths each year, approximately 25% are due to haemorrhage.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

Projects tackling key health challenges of antimicrobial use and skin cancer are the first to be funded under a flagship initiative by the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine.

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

UQ Centre for Clinical Research

Deputy Executive Dean and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Melissa Brown, said the faculty is committed to progressing worthy world-class research by providing operational support over five years to deliver health outcomes.

“Our Health Outcomes Programs, or HOPs, represent a strategic approach to faculty research, in collaboration with our hospital and health partners,” Professor Brown said.

“These are very specific and targeted programs of research that address an identified health problem and will produce a specific and visible benefit.”

The first project selected will address high rates of infection in critically ill patients by optimising antimicrobial therapy.

The research team will use whole genome sequencing to rapidly determine which bacteria are causing infection so the most suitable drug and dose combination can be given. Once the process is established, the research team will test it in the clinic and determine its benefits to individual patients and the health system.

The project led by Professor Jason Roberts and Professor David Paterson includes researchers from UQ’s Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR) and School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences (SCMB).

The second program to be supported focuses on harnessing technology to address the problem of high melanoma incidence and mortality.

The research team will recruit high risk participants to test targeted screening using 3D total body photography and mobile teledermoscopy in the context of the Australian health care system.

Results will be used to drive evidence-based changes to clinical practice.

The project will be led by Professor Peter Soyer of UQ’s Diamantina Institute and Professor David Whiteman, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, and includes collaborators from QUT, QIMR Berghofer and UQ’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business.

Professor Brown said both teams should be congratulated for working collaboratively to create change and translate research into tangible health outcomes.

“These projects were selected following a competitive application process engaging interstate reviewers in late 2016, and we look forward to seeing them make a difference to health care in the years ahead.”

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about studying medicine at UQ. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, March 9th, 2017

JCU researchers say rural children’s oral health in question

James Cook University researchers say children in rural Queensland are three times more likely to be admitted to hospital for dental problems than in other parts of the state.

The team from JCU’s Anton Breinl Research Centre for Health Systems Strengthening, funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, looked at three rural communities within 400 kilometres of Townsville. The names of the towns have not been publicly released.

JCU researchers say rural children's oral health in question

Dr Karen Carlisle (Photo: JCU)

Dr Karen Carlisle said although these communities were better served than those in more remote locations, access to services was still an issue for many community members.

“Children under 14 were three times more likely to be hospitalised for dental conditions when compared to residents of the rest of Queensland,” she said.

Dr Carlisle said JCU researchers had been working in the communities for a number of years and suspected overall oral health was poor, but now they had the hard data to back this up.

She said they had some unexpected results, too.

“Indigenous persons living in Queensland as a whole are already more than three times as likely to be hospitalised for a dental condition than non-Indigenous people,” said Dr Carlisle. “But this pattern worsened only slightly in the particular rural communities we looked at.”

The researchers said that parents or caregivers play a crucial role in influencing children’s oral health and rural children under 14 years may not be accessing public oral health services in proportion to their need. They said strengthening health promotion though schools, community events and primary health care is vital.

Co-author Professor Sarah Larkins said there were a number of recognised reasons for the poor oral health of rural communities and that the social determinants of health play a major role.

“There are problems with the retention of the oral health workforce in rural areas and reduced availability of oral health services. There may be less access to fluoridated water and the social determinants of ill health, such as poverty and low levels of education, are all more prevalent in rural and remote areas.”

She said the stoicism of rural people and difficulties in accessing care tended to encourage them to tolerate oral health problems until they became acute.

Professor Larkins said the findings highlight the vital importance of a collaborative approach to planning and service delivery to improve oral health for rural communities.

JCU partners with communities in research to try to make services work better for people living and working in the bush. This extends to frontline engagement too.

“The university sends its health professional students, including dentistry students, to remote and rural regions on placements, to do outreach in schools and encourages its graduates to return back to rural and remote areas to work after graduation,” said Professor Larkins.

Dr Felicity Croker said the communities JCU has focused on have been very receptive to working with students and academics.

“They have really taken charge of improving the oral health in their community, particularly for the younger members of their community.  Engaging these communities in changing the direction of their own health care means that the changes are more likely to be appropriate and sustainable.”

By Prof Larkins

JCU Bachelor of Dental Surgery

The BDS program at JCU is a five-year undergraduate degree that provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes they need to become competent practitioners of dentistry. It is a broad-based program which includes all aspects of dental practice but also has a special focus on issues of special concern to the northern Australian region, particularly those relating to tropical, rural and Indigenous practice.

Program: Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS)
Location: Cairns, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Entry requirements

1. High School

These qualifications are considered on an individual basis, subject to satisfying prerequisite requirements.

  • A minimum of 92% average from grade 12 subjects.
  • Completion of prerequisites in English, Calculus, and Chemistry at a grade 12 level or higher.

2. Partially or fully completed undergraduate degree

A high level of academic standard is required for entry.

  • Students need to have met the prerequisite subjects at least at the high school level to meet the prerequisite requirements.
  • A minimum of 80% cumulative average across all university studies is required.

Please note the DAT is not required for entry into the Bachelor of Dental Surgery program.

Apply to JCU Dental School!

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Learn more about JCU Dental School! For more information, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

University of Sydney offering $10 million in new scholarships for international postgraduate students

International students will have even more reason to choose the University of Sydney for their postgraduate research degrees, with the announcement of 40 new fully funded PhD scholarships available from 2017.

“We want to attract the best students from anywhere in the world and these new scholarships—growing to an investment of $10 million per year—will help us do that,” said Associate Professor Ross Coleman, the university’s Director of Graduate Research.

University of Sydney offering $10 million in new scholarships for international postgraduate students

Find out how you can apply for a Sydney scholarship (Photo: University of Sydney)

“The university was founded on a principle of meritocratic admission and we are pleased to build on this foundation with these new PhD scholarships,” said Associate Professor Coleman.

“Graduate students are future researchers and high-level thinkers who will help solve the problems facing the world, as well as making new knowledge available to everyone. These new scholarships will help more of the cleverest people do their PhD studies with us.”

The new scholarships will be available to all international postgraduate research students in any discipline, and students will be considered for the scholarships when they tick the scholarship option on their application to study. Scholarship winners will be selected on the basis of academic performance in qualifying degrees and any prior research experience.

Like all University of Sydney centrally awarded postgraduate research scholarships, these new scholarships will be available all year with no application closing dates. The best students will get a scholarship offer in less than two months from submitting their application to study.

The new scholarships follow the same allocation as the federal government’s Research Training Program scholarships, which are for both domestic and international postgraduate research students. The university’s new international student scholarships include

  • tuition fees for the postgraduate research degree;
  • a stipend to assist students with their living costs while undertaking their postgraduate research degree; and
  • an allowance to assist students with ancillary costs of their degree, including relocation costs to Sydney, thesis printing and academic publication costs, and overseas student health cover costs.

“The value of a PhD is in the capacity of the doctoral graduate to identify and think through difficult problems. By increasing the number of funded PhD scholarships for students to work with our world-leading researchers, the University of Sydney is investing significantly in a better future,” said Associate Professor Coleman.

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Would you like more information about research degrees available at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK Australian Research Programs Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.