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Friday, October 20th, 2017

Unlimited options: What would you like to study in Australia?

OzTREKK Blog: by Admissions Officer Heather Brown

As the admissions officer for undergraduate and postgraduate programs here at OzTREKK, I have learned about some awesome program options available to students!

Did you know that there are genetic counselling degrees available? Are you passionate about underwater archaeology? Have you always wanted to learn more about marine biology and study it in an awesome climate? These are all great choices for students to consider and our Australian university partners are always looking for Canadians to apply. Also, studying these programs in Oz may give you a competitive edge with unique placement opportunities that are not available here in Canada.

Whether you want to apply to unique or typical programs, studying an undergrad or postgrad program would be exciting if you have the opportunity to live in and travel Australia! Here are some of my favourites!

Unlimited options: What would you like to study in Australia?

Study environmental sciences at an Australian university!

Master of Integrated Water Management

The Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland is one of the few courses in the world that takes a truly transdisciplinary, integrated approach to water management in both developed and developing country contexts. What makes this degree so interesting is that it is co-badged and co-delivered by leading industry practitioners and lecturers from International WaterCentre’s founding member universitiesUniversity of Queensland, Monash University, Griffith University, and the University of Western Australia—all OzTREKK Australian university partners, btw.

The Master of Integrated Water Management creates water leaders by drawing on international teaching and research from many fields to provide a whole-of-water-cycle approach. Students get the skills to consider the impacts of decisions systemically across environment, politics, law, science, culture, engineering, economics, health and society.

Oh yeah, and they have scholarships for this.

Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 2 years
Next available intake: February 2019

Apply to the UQ Master of Integrated Water Management!

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Master of Genetic Counselling

The University of Melbourne’s 2-year Master of Genetic Counselling is designed to build and increase skills and breadth in clinical practice and research, utilising the expertise of tutors who are clinicians, genetic counsellors, scientists, people with a disability and community members. The program teaches counselling skills, research skills and clinical genetics knowledge in small interactive student groups.

Program: Master of Genetic Counselling
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Melbourne Master of Genetic Counselling degree!

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Master of Science in Marine Biology and Ecology

James Cook University is the leading education and research institution for marine biology in the Tropics. JCU’s location allows students and research staff ready access to a wide variety of tropical marine systems including coral reefs, tropical estuaries, mangrove habitats and seagrass beds. Links between research and teaching programs ensure that students are at the cutting edge of marine research.

Program: Master of Science (Marine Biology and Ecology)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: February and July
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to the Master of Science at James Cook University!

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If you are interested in applying to an undergraduate or postgraduate degree that’s beyond the “ordinary,” email me at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355—I’m here to help!

Friday, October 20th, 2017

Sydney Law School lecturer discusses misconceptions about crime

Punishment isn’t always the answer to reduce crime.

Sydney Law School lecturer discusses misconceptions about crime

Host Chris Neff – Open for Discussion podcast

How do we encourage people not to break the law? Most times we think of crime, it’s after the fact. But what if through certain measures we could stop a crime before it happens? No, it’s not a Tom Cruise movie, simply the idea that through certain measures, the opportunity for crime may be removed.

Dr Garner Clancey from Sydney Law School joined Open for Discussion to chat crime statistics and the strategies used today to prevent crimes. Dr Garner Clancey, a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Sydney Law School, is an expert in crime prevention and statistics and over the past 25 years has worked with NSW Police, the Department of Juvenile Justice and other government organisations on a number of crime prevention strategies.

Here, Dr Clancey shares four misconceptions about crime:

Myth 1: The crime rate is going up

We’re not in the grips of a crime wave. In fact, the overall crime rate in NSW has been declining since the turn of the millennium. In the UK the crime rate began declining around 1995, while in the US it began to fall in 1990, 1991.

And the falls have been quite dramatic. For example, in the year 2000 there were approximately 82,000 incidents of burglary per year in NSW, while last year it was only 32,000. And the murder rate in the state is the lowest it’s been in 40 years.

Problem is, no one can explain the major drop—it’s criminology’s “dirty little secret!

Myth 2: Closed circuit television is a good prevention tool

CCTV can be successful in preventing thefts from shops; however, the data shows that for public places it’s really not all that useful.

People may not know the cameras are there, especially if they’re intoxicated, so continue with the behaviour anyway. And those watching the cameras may not realise anything criminal is going on so can’t do anything to stop the crime.

Some cameras aren’t even monitored, so are only helpful for identification once a crime has been committed.

Myth 3: Putting people in prison stops crime

Prison is a big investment without a great return.

It costs the state approximately $200 a day to incarcerate an adult in NSW, while it costs nearly $1,000 a day to incarcerate a juvenile. It’s further reported that nearly half of those leaving prison today in NSW will return to prison within two years.

Myth 4: All crimes are reported equally

For those crimes that people need to report for insurance reasons, such as car theft or house break ins, we know the statistics are fairly accurate—not much goes unreported. Unfortunately, the opposite is true for sexual assault and domestic violence. This means that the recent rise in those crimes is only telling part of the story.

Listen to Dr Garner Clancey on SoundCloud, subscribe on iTunes.

Christopher Pepin-Neff is a lecturer in Public Policy in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. His research interests include theories of the policy process, policy analysis, the role of policy entrepreneurs, and comparative public policy.

About the University of Sydney Law School Juris Doctor

The Sydney Law School is Australia’s first. Since its inception, it has been at the forefront of developments associated with both the teaching and research of law. Its strong sense of commitment to the fundamentals of law is combined with a commitment to innovation and the exploration of issues at the cutting edge.

The Sydney JD comprises the core legal subjects required throughout the world for professional accreditation coupled with the study of a wide range of elective subjects which allows advanced learning in both specialized fields and law in general. Teaching and learning methodology includes a wide range of formats to allow individual choice, a deep understanding of the law, independent research and the development of the skills and ethics inherent in modern professional practice.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 3 years
Semester intake: March
Application deadline: Candidates are strongly encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply now to Sydney Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Sydney Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Monash to become first 100 percent renewable energy powered university in Australia

By the year 2030, Monash University expects all of the energy used on its campuses will be clean and renewable.

Monash to become Australia's first 100 per cent renewable energy powered university

Solar panels at Clayton campus (Photo: Monash University)

The university is investing $135 million to achieve its aim with a project called Net Zero.

Monash University President and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Margaret Gardner AO, said the Net Zero initiative was the most ambitious project of its kind undertaken by an Australian university.

“Leadership in sustainability, of the kind to which Monash aspires requires much more than being carbon neutral by offsetting emissions through carbon credits or similar mechanisms. The university strives to completely eliminate its dependence on fossil fuels,” Professor Gardner said.

“Monash is actively reducing its emissions and, by transforming our energy infrastructure and following a deep decarbonisation strategy, ensuring that all the energy we use on our campuses is clean.”

As well as committing to net zero carbon emissions from their Australian campuses, all of Monash’s operations will also be carbon neutral by 2030.

Residual emissions from operations—such as plane travel—will be offset by purchasing certified and socially conscious carbon offset programs.

“Clean affordable and reliable energy is something that we all want. This target is about putting our world-leading research and campuses to work to show that a 100-percent renewable future is not only possible, but good for business and the planet too,” said Monash Engineering and Sustainability Manager Dr Rob Brimblecombe.

Net Zero is not an overnight revolution. Monash has been greening itself for some time, beginning in 2005 when the university began measuring its performance in emissions, energy use, waste, water and transport. It then set an energy reduction target of 20 percent based on those early measurements.

In 2010 the first solar panels went in on each campus.

Now there are more than 4,000 panels in place, enough to power 100 average Australian households.

Building is now underway at the Clayton campus for an on-site microgrid that will help the university control when and how energy is used.

The Monash microgrid will be connected to the Victorian energy grid, which in the future can reduce the demand and strain on the network during peak times.

The state government, through the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), contributed $100,000 seed funding for the Monash Microgrid.

The Net Zero Initiative is set to directly benefit research at the university, which is building the microgrid to model and assess the performance of energy network systems.

“The Monash Microgrid will provide a real-world example demonstrating how communities can keep their energy system affordable and resilient, in particular during peak periods and extreme weather events,” said Director of the Monash Energy Materials and Systems Institute, Dr Jacek Jasieniak.

“We’re using our campuses and research to develop scalable clean energy solutions that can be tested here and deployed around the world,” Dr Jasieniak said.

By the end of 2020, the university will complete its biggest solar roll out. By then, it will be generating 7 GWh of energy, the equivalent of powering 1,000 homes in Victoria for a year.

The project supports the concept of Monash as a living lab, with research and teaching linked to operational sustainability.

Monash University is also eliminating gas and moving to 100 percent electricity.

“By 2030 all of our energy consumption will be electric and from renewable sources,” Professor Gardner said.

The university is also reducing the overall energy consumption of their operations. This includes updating all of their campus lighting to LED, ensuring sustainability certification of all new buildings, and only investing in appliances and equipment that are energy efficient.

Monash University is asking

  • How do you make Australia’s economy carbon neutral?
  • How do we solve the water crisis?
  • What does a sustainable city look like?

While the researchers, educators, partners and funders may speak different “languages” (science, the arts, engineering and policy for example) they are working together to achieve a common purpose.

The Monash Sustainability Institute programs and initiatives investigate how to build water-sensitive cities and better manage water resources. They are catalysing action across Australia’s economy to reduce greenhouse emissions and valuing and integrating indigenous knowledge to help manage natural resources, putting environmental sustainability at the centre of decision making. Monash is understanding and influencing human behaviour, training and educating the next generation of leaders in sustainability, and much more.

Apply to a Monash Environmental Sciences Program!

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Would you like to study sustainability? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com for more information.

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017

Bond Law finishes the mooting year on the winner’s podium

Bond University has capped off an outstanding year for its mooting teams by winning the biggest national moot competition in Australia.

Bond Law School students, Pierfrancesco Benedetti, Matthew Keyte, Oceane Pearse and Cameron Simpson out-argued 26 teams representing 17 of the country’s most prestigious universities and law schools to take out the Annual Michael Kirby Moot on Contract Law for 2017.

Bond Law finishes the mooting year on the winner's podium

Bond Law mooting champions  (Photo: Bond University)

The team’s winning achievements also included Honourable Mentions for Best Written Claimant Memorandum and Best Written Respondent Memorandum, while Oceane Pearse was awarded the prize for (joint) Best Oralist in the final round.

Named in honour of retired high court judge, the Honourable Michael Kirby, the competition involved four intense days of mooting, and written summaries of argument before each moot. The moot problem involved a contractual law dispute, and included the cutting-edge issue of a smart contract.

“Winning the Kirby Moot is particularly significant for the Bond team, given Justice Kirby’s long association with the university,” said Mooting Director and team coach, Assistant Professor Louise Parsons.

“It was also an honour for our students to argue the final round against the Queensland University of Technology team in front of Justice Kirby who served as one of the competition judges.”

This recent win adds to Bond’s list of national and international successes this year.

In the global arena, Bond teams were declared world champions in the Red Cross International Humanitarian Law Moot in Hong Kong and the Wanhuida Cup Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition hosted by Beijing Foreign Studies University (the sixth time Bond has won this event).

At the Vis (East) international Commercial Arbitration Moot Competition, they reached the quarter finals in a record field of 800 students from 125 teams representing 32 different countries.

On the national mooting scene, Bond University were runners up in the QUT Torts Moot Competition and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Moot Competition.

Bond Law has a strong tradition in mooting and a formidable reputation for its many successes around the world,” said Assistant Professor Parsons.

“Our teams and coaches put in an incredible amount of work preparing and practicing for each event but most students rate it as one of the most rewarding aspects of their time at University.

“Winning the Kirby Moot makes 2017 the fourth consecutive year when Bond has won three major competitions in a 12-month period and our students have already started preparing for some 2018 competitions.”

About Bond Law School and Juris Doctor (JD) Program

Bond University’s Juris Doctor program is a professional legal qualification designed to equip students for a career in the legal profession, business, industry or government, in Australia and overseas. This law program features excellent teaching, small classes and an extensive legal skills program, which provides an exciting learning experience that challenges students academically and prepares them practically for a legal career.

With three intakes per year, January, May and September, Bond Law Juris Doctor candidates are able to apply any time throughout the year—and the LSAT is not required!

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Next available intake: January 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Students from Canada should apply early, particularly if they are seeking entry for a September intake.

Apply now to Bond University Law School!

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Do you have any questions about how to apply to Bond Law School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 for more information!

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

James Cook University celebrates 25 years of nursing

James Cook University is proud to celebrate 25 years of nursing graduates serving northern Queensland communities.

James Cook University celebrates 25 years of nursing

Celebrating 25 years of JCU nursing graduates (Photo: JCU)

Head of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition at JCU, Professor Melanie Birks said the silver jubilee is about celebrating the achievements of nursing  graduates and the important role they play in northern Queensland and beyond.

“JCU has graduated many nurses and midwives who have gone on to make a difference to the communities we serve,” said Professor Birks. “We are exceptionally proud of our staff, students and graduates and value our excellent relationships with industry partners. Marking our twenty-five years of producing a major component of the healthcare workforce in this region formalises this pride in our achievements.”

To mark the occasion, the university is naming a lecture theatre at the Townsville campus after the late Emeritus Professor Barbara Hayes OAM. Professor Hayes was the Foundation Head of the Department of Nursing Sciences and Foundation Professor of Nursing Sciences, and her contribution helped shape the cultural foundations of what is today the College of Healthcare Sciences.

A member of the first cohort and current JCU senior lecturer Dr Narelle Biedermann completed her PhD under the supervision of Professor Hayes. She said Professor Hayes is remembered for strengthening and developing the academic side of nursing and midwifery in Australia, and her teaching continues to resonate with current students at JCU.

“We were always told we could make a real difference, and that the learning and care and research we were carrying out was important work,” said Dr Biedermann. “That message is still the same today although the buildings and the learning methods have changed.”

The JCU Department of Nursing was the university’s first undergraduate health science department and the first university school of nursing in the Tropics in Australia. It opened in 1990 and there were 70 in the first graduating class of 1993, who are known as the Auroras.

About the JCU Bachelor of Nursing

Program: Bachelor of Nursing Science
Location: Townsville or Cairns, Queensland
Semester intakes: February or July
Program duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements

Eligible applicants must have completed a high school diploma. A minimum GPA of 67% in the best six Ontario Grade 12 subjects or equivalent for students from other provinces. If you have completed post-secondary studies at the college and/or university level, those grades will also be considered. Applicants must also have completed the prerequisite subject of English at the high-school level. Biology, chemistry and any high school studies in mathematics are recommended.

Apply to JCU Nursing School!

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For more information about studying nursing, contact Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Heather Brown heather@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, October 16th, 2017

Five star ratings for the University of Queensland

An independent ranking of Australian universities has awarded the University of Queensland  multiple five star ratings.

Five star ratings for the University of Queensland

Find out how you can study at UQ

The 2018 edition of the The Good Universities Guide gave UQ a five-star rating for student demand, staff qualifications and learning resources.

The guide also revealed that UQ is top in the country for starting salary in nursing and science and mathematics.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Joanne Wright said that UQ was the only Group of Eight university to achieve five stars in a key measure of student experience.

“The university’s results were above the national average in seven of eight measures of students experience and graduate outcomes,” she said.

“We have been working very hard to ensure that students benefit both personally and intellectually during their time at UQ and will improve even further in this are with our five-year student strategy.

“I’m thrilled to see that UQ’s great facilities and beautiful campuses have been acknowledged, with students giving favourable assessments of teaching spaces, online learning materials, laboratories and IT support.”

Why Canadians Enjoy Studying at UQ

Students from Canada choose the University of Queensland primarily for its international reputation as an outstanding academic institution, having won more awards for teaching excellence than any other Australian university, as well as its location in the vibrant city of Brisbane. UQ offers Canadians an exceptional program choice across a wide range of study areas at undergraduate, postgraduate and research higher degree levels.

Popular schools at UQ for Canadian students

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Find out more about how you can study at the University of Queensland!

Friday, October 13th, 2017

Shannon’s favourite vegetarian restaurants in Australia

OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston has been a vegetarian since 1999, and when she travels to Australia, she likes to discover some of the best vegetarian restaurants in the places she visits.

Shannon's favourite vegetarian restaurants in Australia

Yes, you can have a vegetarian Aussie barbecue!

Whether you’re a vegetarian, a vegan, or a proud meat eater, Australia offers a huge variety of restaurant styles and cuisine! You didn’t choose to study in Australia because you wanted to sit indoors and eat frozen pizza and hot dogs, right?

While famous for their insanely delicious coffee, Australia is also home to many “healthy lifestyle” eateries, and I’ve made a list of some I think you should check out!

Trippy Taco in St Kilda, Victoria
Vegan Mexican? Yes, please. Even though I am not a vegan, this place is great as it can make anything into a vegan option if you should so choose! Cuisine includes tacos, burritos, quesadillas, nachos, breakfast burritos and Nutella and banana in a flour tortilla. Yum. Beverages are Inca cola and beverages imported from Central and South America, Mexican beer and mixed drinks.

Lafew Teahouse and Kombucha Bar in Lismore, New South Wales
This is a great little community-based tea house. Menu includes great salads, soups, teas, nut milks and blended drinks, kombucha, acai blends, raw desserts, organic coffee and chai latte. Has gluten-free options, and holds workshops!

OM Vegan Kitchen in Surry Hills, New South Wales
How about relaxing by Harmony Park? The OM Vegan Kitchen offers a daily self-serve lunch buffet, plus guilt-free desserts, organic shakes and smoothies.  Cuisine includes vegan, Indian, international, organic, Western, buffet, Mediterranean, take-out, and fusion—which means you have a ton of options!

PingAn Veggie Time in Brisbane, Queensland
The first Thai vegan restaurant in Brisbane (Clayfield) run by a veggie family! Offers vegan versions of Thai favorites such as tom yum soup, Thai curries, pad Thai noodles, chili basil stir fried, salads. There are even a number of vegan and gluten-free meal options.

So there you have it—now you don’t have any excuses to settle for boring hamburgers and pizza!

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Find out more about studying law in Australia!

Friday, October 13th, 2017

OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Seminars

Want to study law but unsure of your options? Do you have questions about admissions, program structures, accreditation, practicing in Canada? Join OzTREKK for the upcoming Australian Law Schools Seminars and get the answers to your questions. Everyone is welcome to attend. Seating is limited, so be sure to register.

OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Seminars

Don’t forget to register!

University of Toronto Mississauga
Date: October 16, 2017
Time: 3 – 5 p.m.
RSVP – See you soon!

Ryerson University
Date: October 17, 2017
Time: 12:30 – 2 p.m.
RSVP – See you soon!

The following Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD:

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For information about about law degrees offered in Australia, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call (toll free in Canada) at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 12th, 2017

What is genetic counselling?

Internationally, genetic counselling is taught within a 2-year clinical master degree. In Canada, only five universities offer a Master of Science in genetic counselling with very few places for each, and entry can be extremely competitive. It’s no wonder students with a passion for understanding genetics are looking elsewhere to continue their studies.

What is genetic counselling?

Study genetic counselling at the University of Melbourne

What is genetic counselling?

The practice of genetic counselling combines the expertise of genetic disease mechanisms with a sensitive appreciation of the psychological burdens and complex social and ethical issues associated with genetic disorders. Genetic counsellors work in a multidisciplinary team with clinical geneticists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, communicating complex genetic information to individuals and families to facilitate decision making.

The University of Melbourne’s 2-year Master of Genetic Counselling is designed to build and increase skills and breadth in clinical practice and research, utilising the expertise of tutors who are clinicians, genetic counsellors, scientists, people with a disability and community members.

The degree will fulfill the requirements for certification and employment as a genetic counsellor in Australia and reciprocity with training overseas. The program teaches counselling skills, research skills and clinical genetics knowledge in small interactive student groups. Problem Based Learning is one mode of teaching in the genetics tutorials.

Past graduates are employed throughout the world, including in Singapore, Malaysia, New Zealand. It is expected that graduates of the Melbourne Master of Genetic Counselling will be eligible to register to practice as genetic counsellors in the UK and Canada, further increasing employment opportunities.

Program: Master of Genetic Counselling
Duration: 2 years
Next available intake: February 2019

Apply to the University of Melbourne Master of Genetic Counselling degree!

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Find out more about studying genetic counselling and other health sciences degree at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com for more information.

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

UQ sports science consistently ranked among best in world

The UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked among the best in the world for sport science for the second year in a row.

The school ranked 5th globally and 2nd in Australia in the ShanghaiRanking’s Global Ranking of Sport Science Schools and Departments 2017.

UQ sports science consistently ranked among best in world

UQ sports science—an interdisciplinary approach to research (Photo: UQ)

The ranking assessed key areas of research performance, including the number of papers published in top sport science journals and the number of citations of articles.

Head of the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Professor Andrew Cresswell said the accolade was a reflection of the University of Queensland’s dedication to being an international leader in exercise and sport science research and education.

“We take an interdisciplinary approach to research which is critical to allow effective translation of knowledge into practice,” Professor Cresswell said.

“Our research is diverse and focuses on addressing multi-dimensional questions related to how and why humans move and obtain nutrition.

“We focus on areas critical to health and disease prevention across the lifespan—including exercise, physical activity and health, dietetics and nutrition, sensorimotor neuroscience, sport, physical and health education.”

Professor Cresswell said the school’s performance was led by outstanding teaching and research staff, and work being undertaken in the research centres.

“Our strong commitment to excellence in teaching and research is paramount to our success, and permeates everything we do,” Professor Cresswell said.

“We aspire to be at the forefront of learning and strive to ensure students meet the needs of the sport science industry, are job-ready, and equipped with the skills and knowledge to succeed in their chosen careers.

“To be rated among the very best in the world is a huge accolade.”

UQ Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)

Studying the UQ sport science program will ignite your interest in the complexities of maintaining an active, healthy human body and allow you to make an essential contribution to well-being, rehabilitation and performance. This program focuses on understanding how to enhance human performance, how the body responds to exercise and physical activity, and how to conduct research which could help build healthier communities and stronger athletes.

Career opportunities are varied and may include prescribing and delivering exercise and physical activity programs in the fitness industry, developing strength and conditioning programs to assist elite athletes and sporting teams, delivering workplace health promotion and executive health management programs, or conducting diagnostic measurements (cardiac, sleep, respiratory or neurophysiology) in hospitals or other clinical services.

Program: Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Would you like more information about studying UQ sports science? Please contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.