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Articles categorized as ‘Career Spotlight’

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

Attend a Sydney Health Sciences Seminar

Would you like to further your studies in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology or another health science field?

Attend an upcoming University of Sydney Health Sciences information session between March 28 and 30 and get your questions answered!

Venue: University of Toronto, Bahen Centre, Room 2175
Date: Tuesday, March 28
Time: 6 p.m.

Venue: Simon Fraser University, Halpern Centre, Room 114
Date: Wednesday, March 29
Time: 5 p.m.

Venue: University of British Columbia, Woodward Building, Room 3
Date: Thursday, March 30
Time: 5 p.m.

Be sure to RSVP for a Sydney Health Sciences Information Session!

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Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

UQ sport science ranks in global top 5

The UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked 4th and 5th in the world for sport science in two highly respected global rankings systems.

This January, UQ placed 4th in CEOWORLD Magazine’s World’s Top Universities for Sport Science In 2016.

UQ sport science ranks in global top 5

UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked 4th and 5th in the world for sport science! (Photo: UQ)

Head of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Professor Andrew Cresswell said the accolade was a reflection of UQ’s dedication to being a world-leader in sport and exercise science education and research.

“Our strong commitment to excellence in teaching and research is paramount to our success, and permeates everything we do,” Professor Cresswell said.

“We aspire to be at the forefront of learning and strive to ensure students meet the needs of the sport science industry, are job-ready, and equipped with the skills and knowledge to succeed in their chosen careers.”

The ranking is based on six key indicators of quality, including academic reputation, admission eligibility, job placement rate, recruiter feedback, specialisation, and global reputation and influence.

It comes one month after UQ ranked 5th in the ShanghaiRanking’s Global Ranking of Sport Science Schools and Departments 2016.

The ShanghaiRanking assessed key areas of research performance, including the number of papers published in top sport science journals and the number of citations of articles.

Professor Cresswell said the school’s performance was led by outstanding teaching and research staff, and work being undertaken in the research centres.

“To be rated among the very best in the world by two highly respected ranking systems, and to score higher than many larger universities with celebrated kinesiology and human movement departments, is a huge accolade,” Professor Cresswell said.

Why study the UQ Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)?

This program will ignite your interest in the complexities of maintaining an active, healthy human body and allow you to make an essential contribution to well-being, rehabilitation and performance. This program focuses on understanding how to enhance human performance, how the body responds to exercise and physical activity, and how to conduct research which could help build healthier communities and stronger athletes.

Career opportunities are varied and may include prescribing and delivering exercise and physical activity programs in the fitness industry, developing strength and conditioning programs to assist elite athletes and sporting teams, delivering workplace health promotion and executive health management programs, or conducting diagnostic measurements (cardiac, sleep, respiratory or neurophysiology) in hospitals or other clinical services.

Program: Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

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Learn more about studying UQ sports science! Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston: shannon@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

Exploring occupational therapy as a career option


What exactly is occupational therapy and how does it differ from physio?

Exploring occupational therapy as a career option

UQ offers a Master of Occupational Therapy Studies program! (Photo: UQ)

Unlike physiotherapy, which evaluates and helps to maintain and restore physical function, occupational therapy helps to solve the problems that interfere with a person’s ability to do everyday things, like dressing, bathing, washing dishes, eating, and other tasks most of us take for granted. Occupational therapy can also help to prevent a problem or minimize its effects.

When do people see occupational therapists?

Usually, occupational therapists are sought when a disability, injury, illness or other problem limits someone’s abilities to care for himself, participate in work, or just enjoy regular leisure time or hobbies. These skills and regular activities are so important to us as people that they often describe how we view ourselves—we identify with our jobs and activities. When disability or injury prevents someone from being able to accomplish a simple, everyday task such as buttoning a shirt, it can affect how he or she feels about himself.

That’s where an occupational therapist comes in.

What do occupational therapists do?

Occupational therapists are highly trained health-care professionals, and they define an occupation as much more than a chosen career. Occupation refers to everything that people do during the course of everyday life, including feeding and dressing themselves. Everyone has many occupations that are essential to our health and well-being.

According to the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, “occupational therapists use a systematic approach based on evidence and professional reasoning to enable individuals, groups and communities to develop the means and opportunities to identify, engage in and improve their function in the occupations of life. The process involves assessment, intervention and evaluation of the client related to occupational performance in self-care, work, study, volunteerism and leisure. Occupational therapists may assume different roles such as advising  on health risks in the workplace, safe driving for older adults, and programs to promote mental health for youth.”

Depending on the particular situation, an occupational therapist will check

  • what one can and cannot do physically (including strength, coordination, balance, or other physical abilities);
  • what materials are used in the occupation (e.g., cooking utensils, clothing, tools, furniture, etc.);
  • what one can and cannot do mentally (coping strategies, memory, organization skills, or other mental abilities);
  • the social and emotional support available in the home, school, work and community; and
  • the physical setup of the house, school, workplace, classroom, or other environment.

Occupational therapists are also trained how to help others cope with their disabilities. OT can help with coping strategies, strength, coordination, and confidence, and recommend changes to environments that will be helpful. Community support may also be available, and the occupational therapist will also assist with finding specialized transportation, support groups, and funding agencies.

Where do occupational therapists work?

Occupational therapists are generally employed in community agencies, hospitals, chronic care facilities, rehabilitation centres and clinics, schools, social agencies industry or are self-employed. While some occupational therapists specialize in working with a specific age group, like the elderly, others may specialize in a particular disability such as arthritis, developmental coordination disorder, mental illness, or spinal cord injury.

Australian Occupational Therapy Schools

If you are finishing high school, the following Australian universities offer a four-year undergraduate occupational therapy degree:

The following Australian Occupational Therapy Schools offer two-year graduate-entry OT programs for those who have already completed an undergraduate degree:

Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions

If you’re curious about studying occupational therapy and other rehab sciences degrees, don’t miss the upcoming seminar at Western University. Enjoy refreshments and the opportunity to speak with Australian uni representatives and alumni to learn more about how you can study in Australia and practice in Canada! Be sure to RSVP to save your spot.

Western University
Date: February 9, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: UCC, Room 210

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Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh krista@oztrekk.com if you have any questions about studying occupational therapy at an Australian university!

Monday, February 6th, 2017

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he’d been told as a med student

Hailing from Canada, Shaun completed his medical degree at UQ before undertaking his fellowship at the University of Toronto and his residency with University of Calgary. He currently works full time as a Queensland Health registrar within intensive care and in his spare time he works for House Call Doctor— a 100% bulk-billed, after-hours, home GP service operating in Queensland. If you’d like to hear firsthand from a Canadian who is now practicing medicine in Australia, check out Shaun’s advice!

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he'd been told as a med student

Canadian Shaun Hosein, now practicing in Australia! (Photo credit: UQ)

1. Study medicine for the right reasons.
Medicine is a highly rewarding career that has many opportunities in various sub-specialty fields. However it is a long road, requires intensive study, and at times can seem impossible. It is not a decision to be made lightly, and there are times I wish I could fix that leaky pipe in my kitchen. I chose medicine, because it not only helps people, but I enjoy thinking on my feet and problem solving. Reflecting a bit more, it has also developed my personal ethics and communication skills.

2. For international medicine students, you can’t beat UQ for education and lifestyle.
UQ is constantly improving their medicine course which I feel is important when choosing a university and medical school. When I was applying they were very approachable and efficient throughout the application process.  The case-based learning style made me nervous, but I think it is the best way to learn and study medicine. Brisbane is also an amazing city, it has the best climate of all Australian cities (none of this “four seasons in one day” stuff). Plus the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast are about an hour away! Perfect study and lifestyle balance.

3. Studying internationally is incredible, but it can be difficult when you return home.
I have spoken to numerous potential Canadian medical school candidates over the years, and my advice is the same. Studying medicine at UQ was a life-changing event for me, and provided me unique opportunities in an amazing country. I won’t lie—you will find it challenging being away from home, and to be honest, getting back into the Canadian system is difficult. UQ does facilitate opportunities to make this process easier, but it is still a challenge. Be prepared to finish internship training in Australia before considering the road back or please at least obtain and maintain general registration with AHPRA.

4. There are pros and cons to working in different health systems, so consider what’s important to you.
I can only speak in relation to the Canadian and Australian healthcare systems, but in my honest experience you get paid more, will have better shifts and rosters, and overall better work-life balance in Australia.  On the other hand, internship training is structured better in Canada: training is slightly shorter and there are no primary exams, but the programs are very difficult to get accepted into.

5. In medicine, you can have a “typical routine” but you’ll never have a “typical day.”
I currently work for Queensland Health and for House Call Doctor when I have extra time in the evenings, usually on nights off, or weekends. Being a home GP after-hours is very flexible and works well with my schedule. Working with House Call Doctor means I get to visit a wide variety of patients who need urgent after-hours care, treating everything from acute cold and flus to more serious conditions, such as gastro, home accidents or chronic illness. You really never know what kind of patients you’ll treat!

6. Sometimes taking the road less travelled will put you on the right path.
I always wanted to work in primary care, but it was quite difficult to get any experience and determine if it suited me. House Call Doctor has given me this experience but it’s also shown me another side to medical practice. I honestly feel after-hours care is becoming its own sub-specialty of medicine. I enjoy it because it allows me to have a simple chat with patients, to see children or speak with a young mum. It is very rewarding, and not something I could have experienced working in the adult system alone.

7. As a student, it’s easy to get run down from all that studying (and perhaps socialising). When you do get sick there are probably more healthcare options available to you than you think.
House Call Doctor offers 100% bulk-billed home GP visits to anyone with a Medicare or DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affair) Card.  Having a GP visit your home can be particularly useful in acute medical situations that don’t warrant an emergency department response, but can’t wait until normal clinic hours. House Call Doctor visits a wide cross-section of patients, including students living in shared accommodation. International students can also take advantage of the after-hours medical care, rebated if they travelling with BUPA, NIB, Allianz or Medibank insurance. For more information you can visit www.housecalldoctor.com.au, or you can phone the after-hours line on 13 55 66 to book an appointment.

8. Support networks and technology are invaluable for international students.
Having a strong family and supportive Australian peer group is extremely important throughout your medical degree. At the same time, don’t underestimate the impact of technology. Skype, FaceTime, and WhatsApp will ensure you can easily stay in touch with loved ones back home.

9. Your medical degree can take you anywhere and you’re likely to end up somewhere completely different to where you thought you would.
I have worked in numerous medical fields, and I have definitely not taken a straight path. Initially I was very keen on critical care (ICU), but when I worked in Haiti post-earthquake and again in Africa I got a better understanding of health and the need for public health medicine and primary care. I have since completed Canadian postgraduate training in public health medicine, and am now working towards translating my qualification here in Australia. I also have a public health interest in illicit substance abuse and drug use patterns and am completing a fellowship in toxicology. I tell everyone, especially medical students, to never discount the idea of being a GP; I’m still considering it, if I get time.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Don’t miss the Australian Law School seminars

If you’re wondering what it’s like to study law in Australia and then practice in Canada, then don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

Meet Australian law alumni who are successfully practicing in Canada, and chat with Australian law school representatives to learn more about your study and career options!

Don't miss the Australian Law School seminars

Don’t forget to RSVP Australian Law Schools Seminars Jan. 30 – Feb. 9, 2017

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Friday, January 20th, 2017

Wondering how you can get into law school?

Are you interested in studying law but unsure about your options? Would you like to hear from law graduates who have studied in Australia and are now practicing lawyers in Canada?

Get into law school?

RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools seminar!

Then please join OzTREKK, Australian law school representatives, and law school alumni for the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017

Don’t miss the OzTREKK Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions

Australia is world-renowned for its leading-edge rehabilitation sciences research and practice, and Canadians enjoy learning from Australian academics who are world leaders in their fields.

If you’re curious about studying rehab sciences in Australia, don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions. Enjoy refreshments and the opportunity to speak with Australian uni representatives and alumni to learn more about how you can study in Australia and practice in Canada!

OzTREKK Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions

Don't miss the OzTREKK Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions

Join us! Don’t forget to RSVP

Simon Fraser University
Date: January 31, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: Blusson Hall, Room 9655

Western University
Date: February 9, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: UCC, Room 210

Don’t forget to RSVP for the OzTREKK Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions.

What about admissions?

This is where OzTREKK comes in. OzTREKK’s Australian Rehab Sciences Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh will outline each program and its prerequisites. Discover more about your program entry requirements, practicals, and about how you can take your degree home to practice in Canada. Krista can answer your questions!

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Are you curious about studying rehabilitation sciences in Australia? Not sure where to start? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com for more information!

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

Former OzTREKK student practicing physiotherapy in Australia

Former OzTREKKer Kyle Mitchell’s pathway to physiotherapy started with a baseball scholarship to study at the New Mexico Military Institute in the US. He went on to study a Bachelor of Science at the University of British Columbia before relocating to Australia and enrolling in Bond’s Doctor of Physiotherapy.

Former OzTREKK student practicing physiotherapy in Australia

Bond DPT graduate (and former OzTREKKer!) Kyle Mitchell (Photo: Bond University)

While he originally planned to return home to practice in Canada, he’s created a new life for himself on the Gold Coast, working in private practice at Pindara Physiotherapy and Sports Medicine, and in the community as physiotherapist for Bond University’s AFL Club and the Major League Baseball Australian Academy Program. He has also travelled with the Australian National under 15 baseball team to the World Championships.

So what’s it like to study physio at Bond?

My favourite aspects of studying at Bond were the small classes, intensive learning and the large amount of practical clinical experience which made up more than 42 weeks of the course.

The faculty staff arranged a variety of placements so I was exposed to all areas of specialisation. This really broadened my perspective on the profession and I nearly switched my pathway from sports to paediatrics, which I would never have considered if it hadn’t been for a great placement that allowed me to see into that domain.

For me, the most satisfying part of being a physiotherapist is developing a plan and successfully implementing a program for patients who have struggled with an injury for an extended period. In some instances, you have quite literally changed the course of their life.

As a physiotherapist in a private practice, I see patients presenting with a wide variety of conditions, from post-operative orthopaedic issues through to vertigo, vestibular and musculoskeletal disorders. I also have a special interest in sports physiotherapy so I work with athletes and teams—mainly AFL and baseball.

On a typical day, I’ll see 10 to 15 patients. With new patients, I’ll do a clinical history and objective assessment so I can develop a treatment and rehabilitation plan. As treatment progresses, I monitor and support their progress while providing education about their condition.

A number of my patients come through the Department of Veteran Affairs and WorkCover. I’ve learned over time that my interactions have a significant impact on their progress so I spend a lot of time educating patients to help them understand their condition. What you say can be as important as the physical treatment.

I’ve also learned that having a business perspective is essential when you’re working in health. You need to understand the financial implications of your treatment, not only for yourself and the practice, but for patients whose financial situation may impact on their access to your service.

For me, the most satisfying part of being a physiotherapist is developing a plan and successfully implementing a program for patients who have struggled with an injury for an extended period. In some instances, you have quite literally changed the course of their life.

My final internship led to my current position working at Pindara Physiotherapy and Sports Medicine. The internship gave me the opportunity to develop a rapport with the team so that practical element of Bond’s physiotherapy program is invaluable in terms of finding employment. In fact, I have yet to meet a graduate who hasn’t been able to find a job in the field of their choice.

Want to get into Physiotherapy? My advice…

Find your passion and follow it. There are plenty of jobs available in private practice but you need to make sure that whatever you’re interested in will be encouraged or is already promoted at the clinic you choose. That way, you’ll always find the right job.

Also, know that people love to teach and educate others. Use that to become a better clinician by asking questions and seeking out further learning that will allow you to progress in your career!

About Bond Physiotherapy Work Experience and Internships

Bond physiotherapy students complete a clinical internship with an embedded research project in their final semester. This placement is designed to ensure graduates are ideally placed for entering the workforce. The first 30 weeks of clinical experiences will be gained in both hospital and community settings and will include working in the clinical areas of

  • orthopaedics;
  • cardiorespiratory;
  • out-patient musculoskeletal practice (hospital or private practice settings);
  • neurological and orthogeriatric rehabilitation (hospital and community settings); and
  • an elective in paediatrics, women’s/men’s health or sports practice.

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Do you have questions about studying at Bond Physiotherapy School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

University of Sydney Bachelor of Pharmacy alumna discusses her career highlights

Anne Nguyen graduated with a Bachelor of Pharmacy in 2008 from the University of Sydney. Since then her career in pharmacy has taken her to various roles and locations—from hospital pharmacy in Sydney to international management roles in the pharmaceutical industry.

Today, Anne works as a Project Leader for Boston Consultancy Group, a global management-consulting firm, based out of the company’s flagship office in New York City.

With such a diverse career in pharmacy, the university chatted with Anne to find out about her career highlights so far and how she found her experience studying pharmacy at the University of Sydney.

Discover a pharmacy career with alumna Anne Nguyen

Anne Nguyen, Bachelor of Pharmacy graduate (Photo: University of Sydney)

1. In a snapshot, what does your day-to-day role involve?

My role is to manage a team of several consultants and work side-by-side with clients to solve problems.

There is no typical day as a project leader in the pharmaceutical industry; things vary depending on the project and the week. However, it is often a combination of travelling, working with clients, team brainstorms and reviewing presentation decks and analyses.

2. What’s the best opportunity that has come from your current role?

Boston Consultancy Group has exposed me to a wide variety of opportunities. While my focus has mainly been on healthcare, I have been lucky enough as a project leader to manage the design of our new flagship New York office of 600+ people at Hudson Yards.

3. What do you love most about working in pharmacy and healthcare?

A career in pharmacy allows you to work with great people solving interesting problems across a wide variety of industries. I have had the privilege to work with many healthcare clients (e.g., biopharma companies, pharmacies, health insurers and global health foundation), as well as retailers, a media company and even an art school.

Being a project leader in pharmacy is a diverse role and no two days are the same, which keeps things interesting and exciting.

4. Tell us 3 career highlights since graduating pharmacy at Sydney

One of the many great aspects of studying a Bachelor of Pharmacy is the wide variety of career opportunities in healthcare available to you after graduation. After working in some great roles across a range of industries within pharmacy, these have been some of my highlights.

  • I started out my career as an intern at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead Pharmacy. Managing the cardiology ward was one of my great career highlights and where I learnt a lot about what makes a good team and customer service.
  • As a Boston Consultancy Group Associate, I worked on a strategy project with a leading pharmacy to drive significant growth. But even more so, I helped to design and test the solution in 85 stores before it was rolled out to the rest of their stores.
  • As a Boston Consultancy Group consultant, I worked with the global heads of manufacturing and quality at a large biopharma company to improve their organisational structure.

5. Why did you decide to study a degree in pharmacy?

A love of science and a passion to help people were two of the main things that guided me to undertake a career in pharmacy. The Bachelor of Pharmacy degree allowed me to combine and explore both.

6. What did you enjoy most about the Faculty of Pharmacy?

The people! I learnt so much from my peers, the faculty staff and academics. Studying at the University of Sydney allowed me to learn from leaders in the pharmacy industry, who were always willing to pass on their knowledge and lessons learned.

7. Why did studying at the University of Sydney appeal to you?

I was able to study at a top-tiered pharmacy program in unmatched beautiful grounds. Every time I see a Jacaranda tree, it brings back wonderful memories.

University of Sydney Bachelor of Pharmacy

The Bachelor of Pharmacy program provides students with the core skills and knowledge required for the effective delivery of pharmaceutical care and the ability to proceed to research. Students will study the chemical, physical, pharmaceutical, and pharmacological properties of medicinal substances and the application of these in the pharmacy profession. The Faculty of Pharmacy has an enviable national and international reputation that means students will study and interact with world-renowned academics and enjoy access to best practice teaching laboratories and cutting-edge technology.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: It is recommended that candidates apply as early as possible to provide time for the pre-departure process.

Apply to the University of Sydney Bachelor of Pharmacy!

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Learn more about studying pharmacy at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

Bond University Master of Occupational Therapy career pathways

The beauty of undertaking a graduate degree is the opportunity to truly specialise in your field of interest. No longer are you required to register in seemingly pointless classes. Instead, graduate school can really sharpen the focus on what you are passionate about, offering research projects and elective pathways aimed at producing competent and work-ready professionals.

Bond University Master of Occupational Therapy pathways

Study occupational therapy at Bond University

Bond University’s Master of Occupational Therapy program is designed to produce highly competitive graduates with comprehensive clinical skills as well as possessing a solid business acumen and research experience.

It is the first Master of Occupational Therapy in Australia to offer you the opportunity to complete a clinical research project or undertake business electives in preparation for a career in private practice. You will engage in research training before specialising in one of two elective pathways:

  • Clinically focused Research Pathway – The clinically focused research pathway culminates in an individual research project that may be eligible for publication. This pathway prepares you for entry into higher research degrees and careers in research and academia, as well as bolstering research networks.
  • Business-focused Research Pathway – Enables you to undertake business electives that will allow you to undertake management roles, and better prepare you to work in the growing private sector. The pathway culminates in an industry research project where you will apply both research and business skills.

Students are taught by academics and industry staff who are current practicing clinicians with up-to-date industry knowledge.

Bond University Master of Occupational Therapy

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Next intake: May 2017
Duration: 2 calendar years (6 semesters)
Application deadline: No set deadline. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply to the Bond Master of Occupational Therapy program!

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Do you have questions about studying at Bond Occupational Therapy School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.