+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Articles categorized as ‘University of Queensland Medical School’

Wednesday, December 20th, 2017

When do I have to write the MCAT in 2018?

The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a standardized, multiple-choice examination designed to assess the examinee’s problem solving, critical thinking, and knowledge of science concepts and principles prerequisite to the study of medicine.

If you would like to apply to an Australian medical school for the 2019 intake, you’ll be required to sit the MCAT, as it is a prerequisite for most medical programs. That means you’ll have to pay attention test dates and the score release dates!

When do I have to write the MCAT in 2018?

When should you write the MCAT: Applying to an Australian medical school

Applying to an Australian medical school? You’ll need to sit the MCAT!

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application to medical schools in Australia!

Test Date  Score Release+
January 19 Feb. 23
January 25 Feb. 27
April 20 May 22
April 21 May 22
May 18 June 19
May 19 June 19
June 1 July 3
June 2 July 3
June 16 July 17
June 29 July 31
June 30 July 31
July 7 Aug. 7
July 20 Aug. 21
July 21 Aug. 21
July 24 Aug. 23
August 2 Sept. 5
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 9 Sept. 11
August 10 Sept. 11
August 16 Sept. 18
August 18 Sept. 18
August 25 Sept. 25
August 31 Oct. 2
September 1 Oct. 2
September 8 Oct. 9
September 14 Oct. 16
September 15 Oct. 16
September 18 Oct. 23
September 19 Oct. 23

 

MCAT dates for graduate-entry Australian medical programs for 2017 intake

Since not all of our Australian university partners have released the application deadlines for the 2019 intake, we aren’t able list the exact cutoff date to sit the MCAT just yet. Please use the list below (2018 intake dates) as a guide.

Griffith University Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: September 27, 2017; however, applications are assessed on a rolling admissions basis (first come, first served). The sooner you apply the better, as this program can fill quickly.
Last date to sit MCAT: August 25, 2017

James Cook University Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery
Application deadline: August 30, 2017; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.
Last date to sit MCAT: MCAT not required!

Macquarie University Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: October 5, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: August 25, 2017

Monash University Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science / Doctor of Medicine (Graduate Entry)
Application deadline: October 5, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: MCAT not required!

University of Melbourne Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: July 22, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: May 19, 2017

University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions basis (first come, first served). The sooner you apply the better as this program can fill quickly.
Last date to sit MCAT: Candidates are encouraged to sit the MCAT as early as possible.

University of Sydney Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: June 20, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: May 19, 2017

University of Western Australia Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: May 30, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: April 22, 2017

For complete details about the MCAT, please visit the official MCAT website.

Entering an Australian medical school straight from high school?

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

*

Would you like more details about studying medicine in Australia and about the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com for more information.

 

Friday, December 8th, 2017

About the Canadian Resident Matching Service

What is the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS)?

About the Canadian Resident Matching Service

Learn more about studying at a medical school in Australia

The Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) is an impartial, not-for-profit organization that provides a fair and transparent online process to match medical students and residents with medical residency positions throughout Canada.

Using the Match Algorithm, CaRMS matches more than 3,500 applicants each year to postgraduate medical training programs in Canada through four residency matches.

The R-1 Main Residency Match (R-1 match) for entry-level postgraduate positions is CaRMS’ largest match. It is also open to graduates from international medical schools who meet the basic criteria and have no prior postgraduate training in Canada or the US. If you have graduated from a medical school in Australia, you need to apply to CaRMS if you want a medical residency in Canada. Australian medical school graduates who have applied for a residency in the match have fared very well in the past. In fact, according to CaRMS, Australian medical graduates have the best match rates returning to Canada than any other region in the world!

Why do Canadian Australian medical graduates have such a high match rate?

  • Medical training at a world-class educational institution
  • Closest medical education system compared to Canada
  • Similar health care issues to Canada, reflected in their curriculum and training
  • Cultural alignment between our countries

Every year, OzTREKK assists hundreds of Canadian students choose the right Australian medical school program. We understand admissions requirements and application procedures to Australian medical schools, and we can guide you through the differences between undergraduate streams and graduate-entry streams, and the considerations for practicing medicine following graduation.

*

If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. We’re here to help—every step of the way!

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

UQ Faculty of Medicine Information Session Nov. 14, 2017

Why is the University of Queensland the #1 choice for Canadian students studying medicine in Australia?

The Doctor of Medicine offered at the University of Queensland is a postgraduate medical program designed to produce highly skilled doctors capable of meeting future medical challenges in a wide variety of settings.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Information Session Nov. 14, 2017

RSVP for the upcoming UQ Faculty of Medicine info session!

If you’re considering studying medicine in Australia, you are welcome to join OzTREKK and members of the UQ Faculty of Medicine for the upcoming seminar at Western University.

This is your opportunity to meet Professor Robyn Ward AM, Executive Dean (Acting), Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Vice President (Research); Prof Stuart Carney, Deputy Executive Dean and Medical Dean, Faculty of Medicine; and Ms Cecile McGuire, Manager International, Faculty of Medicine.

Canadian students interested in studying medicine at UQ can learn more about this world-renowned medical program. Find out more about entry requirements, program structure, clinical placements, and about the accreditation process—how you can practice in Canada!

Location: Western University, McKellar Theatre
Date: Tuesday, November 14, 2017
Time:  3 – 5 p.m.
RSVP!

Why study the UQ Doctor of Medicine?

The UQ Doctor of Medicine is a postgraduate medical program designed to produce highly skilled doctors capable of meeting future medical challenges in a wide variety of settings.

Years 1 and 2 combine biomedical sciences, public health, medical ethics and clinical skills training in a case-based learning context, focused around a series of patient-centred cases, each designed to highlight principles and issues in health and disease. Early patient contact, clinical reasoning and research training are embedded to develop advanced clinical skills and medical knowledge required for evidence-based clinical practice. In Years 3 and 4, clinical placements are organised around 10 core medical disciplines delivered across 11 clinical schools (hospitals).

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next available Intake: January 2019
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. Applications generally open in early spring each year.

*

Would you like more information about this upcoming UQ Faculty of Medicine information session? Please Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

We know that applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal, and one of the most stress-inducing parts of the process can be the interview portion!

Being prepared and having an idea of the types of questions you may be asked will certainly pay off and help you to feel more comfortable. During your medical school interview, you may encounter questions ranging from the basics like your work history and volunteer experience to more situational and behavioral questions. Here are some ways to help you rock your Australian medical school interview!

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

Are you ready for your medical school interview?

Preparation before the interview

First, what is a multi-mini interview (MMI)?
The MMI is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes. It is designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the school considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment. The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics.

Set a calendar reminder
Your educational future is potentially riding on this interview! As soon as you receive the date and time for your interview, put it in your calendar and set a reminder.

#OzTREKKtip: Don’t ask them to reschedule unless it’s an emergency. Spots fill up extremely quickly and it can be difficult to juggle dozens of applicants. If you truly can’t attend your interview at the specified time, you must contact the university’s admissions office as soon as possible. They will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

Have reliable equipment and internet access
You should use the most reliable method of connection available for your interview (e.g., a wired computer connection, where possible.) Wireless connection can be used, provided that it is sufficiently reliable to complete the interview process. Imagine beginning your interview with shady internet connection—yikes!

Don’t have Skype (or the platform they will use)? Get it. Learn about it. Be prepared to know how it works. Especially learn the instant messaging button as this is where you will read the interview questions.

Practice
What is happening in the world? Find someone to discuss what is happening around you. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story. Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Try to avoid confrontation.

Do your homework
Familiarise yourself with the medical school. What is the school known for? Why is that a good fit for you? Are you interested in rural medicine? It’s a good idea to know the medical profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the field of medicine.

Questions, please
If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of medicine.

Who are you?
Do you have weaknesses? What are they? Are you working on them? Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now? What makes you stand out from other applicants? (don’t brag!) Be prepared to talk about your undergrad degree.

During the interview

Be ready early
On the day of your interview, you must be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Your interview will likely last at least 45 minutes; however, you should allow at least one hour in addition to this time in case there is a delay, or there is a need to clarify a matter. Also note that there won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water handy should you need it.

For verification purposes, you must bring photographic identification (passport or driver’s license) to the interview. Have it ready to show at the beginning of your interview. Now is not the time to go fishing through your purse or digging in your wallet.

Quiet on the set!
The last thing you want during an interview is to be distracted. Choose distraction-free place where you will have excellent internet access. Turn. Your. Cellphone. Off.

Listen 
Sometimes it can be hard to concentrate when we’re stressed, and we often blurt out the first thing that pops into our heads. Do your best to really actively listen to what’s being asked so you can answer appropriately.

Try to remain calm and speak at a moderate pace
Take a deep breath. The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you. Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible. If you don’t know how to answer the question, a simple “I’m not sure” is far better than a long-winded lie.

Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff. If an interviewer has a bad first impression about you, the other aspects of that particular station will likely be graded poorly. Remember, the interviewers are people too, and they are likely volunteering in the MMI process. This is especially important if you consider an interviewer may not even be listening to a word you are saying. At the end of the station, the interviewer may look back at the past 7 or so minutes, and depending on how much verbal diarrhea you may have spewed out, they may only remember how calm, collected, and eloquently spoken you are.

Dress code
This is a no-brainer. Dress appropriately. No one wants to see you just out of bed, in a T-shirt, or wearing exercise gear. You are interviewing for a professional degree!

Express yourself
The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality. Stations can be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc. Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!

Generally speaking, the medical schools will be looking for the following skills and attributes from applicants:

  1. Knowledge relevant to the question and your ability to formulate an approach to address the topic
  2. The capacity to draw implications from your knowledge
  3. Insight into you own attitudes and views (and that of others) relevant to the issue

If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.

Whether this is your first interview or your fiftieth, a little preparation and confidence can go a long way! Remember to keep these tips in mind and to just be yourself. And finally, don’t forget to thank the interviewers for taking the time to meet with you and for the opportunity to participate.

Best of luck!

*

If you have any questions regarding your Australian medical school interview, please contact OzTREKK’s Med Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, May 15th, 2017

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

Regional communities and future health professionals studying through The University of Queensland are big winners from a multi-pronged $54.4 million Federal Government initiative.

In Queensland, UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), providing a major boost to education, training and research in rural south Queensland for nurses, midwives and allied health workers.

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (Photo credit: UQ)

Three new medical training hubs under UQ control will also be established in Central Queensland, Wide Bay and South West Queensland, operating with an aim of retaining doctors in regional areas.

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said research indicated students who experienced rural practice were far more likely to return to work rurally once qualified.

“For the local communities, this is part of a long-term strategy to address maldistribution of the health workforce,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Rural and remote regions of Queensland and Australia often face challenges in attracting and retaining qualified health professionals.

“Students on rural placement will discover the diverse range of professional opportunities available in regional areas, thus enhancing the sustainability and viability of rural health care services.”

UQ joined with the University of Southern Queensland and the Hospital and Health Services of Darling Downs and South West in the successful bid to establish the Southern Queensland Rural Health UDRH.

The UDRH will help provide rural experience to student nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and exercise physiologists.

Commonwealth funding has also been awarded to provide additional clinical, academic and administration staff at UQ’s three regional medical training hubs:

  • Central Queensland: located at Rockhampton, with sub-units at Gladstone and Emerald
  • Southern Queensland: located at Toowoomba, with sub-units at Charleville in south-west Queensland
  • Wide Bay: located at Bundaberg, with sub units at Hervey Bay and Theodore.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward said the hubs would offer doctors rural opportunities at all stages of their medical training.

“This will facilitate postgraduate training opportunities, including specialties, so doctors can stay in regional communities for training and not have to return to the city,” Professor Ward said.

“The Department of Rural Health and the training hubs will build on the high quality education and training experiences already offered by UQ’s Rural Clinical School.”

Announcing the funding, Assistant Minister for Health Dr David Gillespie said regional and rural health training not only addressed workforce shortages and service expectations, but was also essential to regional economic growth.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Faculty of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The faculty is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ Doctor of Medicine!

*

Find out more about UQ Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

Are you planning to study medicine at the University of Queensland? If so, let us introduce you to the UQ Medical Society (UQMS) and their shenanigans (which we hope you plan to be a part of next year!).

The UQ Med Revue is a medical student variety show at the University of Queensland, put on by the UQMS, that normally has in the order of 250 students involved. Students from all four years of med come together to create a hilarious comedy that is jam-packed with puns, parodies, and Professor Parker’s pecs.

UQ medical students act, sing, dance, write, direct, play instruments, make props, design costumes, do hair and make-up and most of the tech for the show making it a truly home-grown production! As the biggest event on the UQMS calendar, the show runs three sold-out nights. In 2017, the dates will be August 13–15th, so mark it in your calendar!

Last year’s Med Revue took them on an adventure “Inside Gout,” with the help of Mr. Hugh Jackman.

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

2017 UQ Med Revue Convenors (L-R): Joel Russell, Ailsa Lee, Will Saunders, Jessica Monteiro and Chris Strom (Photo credit: UQ)

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The UQ Faculty of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the Doctor of Medicine program at UQ!

*

Would you like more information about studying at UQ Medicine? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

Don’t miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal.

Don't miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Finding out what comes after medical school is also a very big deal. To help make the process a little smoother, OzTREKK hosts medical licensing webinars to assist future Australian medical school students to understand the ins and outs of returning to Canada as an international medical graduate. And the first one will be held tomorrow, April 6, at 7 p.m. EDT! During the webinar, you will learn more about

  • the Australian Medical School systems and structure
  • Australian med school rankings
  • medical degree titles such as MD and MBBS
  • Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE), MCCQE1 and MCCQE2
  • the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) program and rates
  • provincially specific programs available to international medical graduates
  • the latest information on the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor;
  • information about the licensing examinations in Canada and the US, what they are, when you need to sit them, and the application process; and
  • the latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia.

…and much more!

Medical Licensing Webinars Schedule

OzTREKK students are invited to attend as many webinars as they wish!

Webinar #1
Date: Thursday, April 6, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #2
Date: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #3
Date: Wednesday, June 14, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #4
Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #5
Date: Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #6
Date: Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Please note the medical licensing webinars are extremely popular and are by invitation only. If you are an OzTREKK student, you and your family will be invited to one of the licensing seminars.

Learn more about studying at an Australian Medical School!

*

Would you like more information about the upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinars? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

Projects tackling key health challenges of antimicrobial use and skin cancer are the first to be funded under a flagship initiative by the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine.

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

UQ Centre for Clinical Research

Deputy Executive Dean and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Melissa Brown, said the faculty is committed to progressing worthy world-class research by providing operational support over five years to deliver health outcomes.

“Our Health Outcomes Programs, or HOPs, represent a strategic approach to faculty research, in collaboration with our hospital and health partners,” Professor Brown said.

“These are very specific and targeted programs of research that address an identified health problem and will produce a specific and visible benefit.”

The first project selected will address high rates of infection in critically ill patients by optimising antimicrobial therapy.

The research team will use whole genome sequencing to rapidly determine which bacteria are causing infection so the most suitable drug and dose combination can be given. Once the process is established, the research team will test it in the clinic and determine its benefits to individual patients and the health system.

The project led by Professor Jason Roberts and Professor David Paterson includes researchers from UQ’s Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR) and School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences (SCMB).

The second program to be supported focuses on harnessing technology to address the problem of high melanoma incidence and mortality.

The research team will recruit high risk participants to test targeted screening using 3D total body photography and mobile teledermoscopy in the context of the Australian health care system.

Results will be used to drive evidence-based changes to clinical practice.

The project will be led by Professor Peter Soyer of UQ’s Diamantina Institute and Professor David Whiteman, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, and includes collaborators from QUT, QIMR Berghofer and UQ’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business.

Professor Brown said both teams should be congratulated for working collaboratively to create change and translate research into tangible health outcomes.

“These projects were selected following a competitive application process engaging interstate reviewers in late 2016, and we look forward to seeing them make a difference to health care in the years ahead.”

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

*

Find out more about studying medicine at UQ. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Australian medical school rankings 2017

Why do so many Canadians consider studying at an Australian medical school?

Austrlian medical school rankings 2017

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Because Australian and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Medical schools in Australia offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting. Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their high world rankings! The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2017 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2017

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
15th University of Sydney
11th University of Toronto
19th University of Melbourne
22nd McGill University
29th Monash University
27th University of British Columbia
42nd University of Queensland
35th McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian Medical Schools in top 50)
QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2017

Undergraduate- versus Graduate-entry Medical Programs

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Graduate Entry: Some Australian Medical Schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.

The following Australian medical schools offer a medical program at a graduate-entry level, which are similar to those medical programs offered in Canada and the United States:

*

For more information about applying to Australian medical schools, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Are you considering applying to Australian Medical Schools? Then you’ll probably want to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is administered multiple times from late January through early September, and offered at hundreds of test sites in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Don’t forget to study! (Photo: Monash University)

The following graduate-entry medical programs require applicants to sit a medical admission test such as the MCAT:

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application.

All deadlines are at 11:59 PM ET on the day of the deadline.

Test date Score release date
March 31 May 2
April 22 May 23
April 28 May 30
May 13 June 13
May 18 June 20
May 19 June 20
June 1 July 6
June 16 July 18
June 17 July 18
June 29 Aug. 1
June 30 Aug. 1
July 21 Aug. 22
July 22 Aug. 22
July 27 Aug. 29
July 28 Aug. 29
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 11 Sept. 12
August 18 Sept. 19
August 19 Sept. 19
August 24 Sept. 26
August 25 Sept. 26

The first three sections organized around 10 foundational concepts in the sciences (biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, general chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology). In the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section, students are asked to analyze, evaluate, and apply information provided by passages from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines.

  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

Register to write the MCAT.

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

Wondering about when you need to write the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.