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Articles categorized as ‘University of Sydney Medical School’

Friday, December 8th, 2017

About the Canadian Resident Matching Service

What is the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS)?

About the Canadian Resident Matching Service

Learn more about studying at a medical school in Australia

The Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) is an impartial, not-for-profit organization that provides a fair and transparent online process to match medical students and residents with medical residency positions throughout Canada.

Using the Match Algorithm, CaRMS matches more than 3,500 applicants each year to postgraduate medical training programs in Canada through four residency matches.

The R-1 Main Residency Match (R-1 match) for entry-level postgraduate positions is CaRMS’ largest match. It is also open to graduates from international medical schools who meet the basic criteria and have no prior postgraduate training in Canada or the US. If you have graduated from a medical school in Australia, you need to apply to CaRMS if you want a medical residency in Canada. Australian medical school graduates who have applied for a residency in the match have fared very well in the past. In fact, according to CaRMS, Australian medical graduates have the best match rates returning to Canada than any other region in the world!

Why do Canadian Australian medical graduates have such a high match rate?

  • Medical training at a world-class educational institution
  • Closest medical education system compared to Canada
  • Similar health care issues to Canada, reflected in their curriculum and training
  • Cultural alignment between our countries

Every year, OzTREKK assists hundreds of Canadian students choose the right Australian medical school program. We understand admissions requirements and application procedures to Australian medical schools, and we can guide you through the differences between undergraduate streams and graduate-entry streams, and the considerations for practicing medicine following graduation.

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. We’re here to help—every step of the way!

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

We know that applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal, and one of the most stress-inducing parts of the process can be the interview portion!

Being prepared and having an idea of the types of questions you may be asked will certainly pay off and help you to feel more comfortable. During your medical school interview, you may encounter questions ranging from the basics like your work history and volunteer experience to more situational and behavioral questions. Here are some ways to help you rock your Australian medical school interview!

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

Are you ready for your medical school interview?

Preparation before the interview

First, what is a multi-mini interview (MMI)?
The MMI is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes. It is designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the school considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment. The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics.

Set a calendar reminder
Your educational future is potentially riding on this interview! As soon as you receive the date and time for your interview, put it in your calendar and set a reminder.

#OzTREKKtip: Don’t ask them to reschedule unless it’s an emergency. Spots fill up extremely quickly and it can be difficult to juggle dozens of applicants. If you truly can’t attend your interview at the specified time, you must contact the university’s admissions office as soon as possible. They will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

Have reliable equipment and internet access
You should use the most reliable method of connection available for your interview (e.g., a wired computer connection, where possible.) Wireless connection can be used, provided that it is sufficiently reliable to complete the interview process. Imagine beginning your interview with shady internet connection—yikes!

Don’t have Skype (or the platform they will use)? Get it. Learn about it. Be prepared to know how it works. Especially learn the instant messaging button as this is where you will read the interview questions.

Practice
What is happening in the world? Find someone to discuss what is happening around you. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story. Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Try to avoid confrontation.

Do your homework
Familiarise yourself with the medical school. What is the school known for? Why is that a good fit for you? Are you interested in rural medicine? It’s a good idea to know the medical profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the field of medicine.

Questions, please
If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of medicine.

Who are you?
Do you have weaknesses? What are they? Are you working on them? Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now? What makes you stand out from other applicants? (don’t brag!) Be prepared to talk about your undergrad degree.

During the interview

Be ready early
On the day of your interview, you must be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Your interview will likely last at least 45 minutes; however, you should allow at least one hour in addition to this time in case there is a delay, or there is a need to clarify a matter. Also note that there won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water handy should you need it.

For verification purposes, you must bring photographic identification (passport or driver’s license) to the interview. Have it ready to show at the beginning of your interview. Now is not the time to go fishing through your purse or digging in your wallet.

Quiet on the set!
The last thing you want during an interview is to be distracted. Choose distraction-free place where you will have excellent internet access. Turn. Your. Cellphone. Off.

Listen 
Sometimes it can be hard to concentrate when we’re stressed, and we often blurt out the first thing that pops into our heads. Do your best to really actively listen to what’s being asked so you can answer appropriately.

Try to remain calm and speak at a moderate pace
Take a deep breath. The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you. Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible. If you don’t know how to answer the question, a simple “I’m not sure” is far better than a long-winded lie.

Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff. If an interviewer has a bad first impression about you, the other aspects of that particular station will likely be graded poorly. Remember, the interviewers are people too, and they are likely volunteering in the MMI process. This is especially important if you consider an interviewer may not even be listening to a word you are saying. At the end of the station, the interviewer may look back at the past 7 or so minutes, and depending on how much verbal diarrhea you may have spewed out, they may only remember how calm, collected, and eloquently spoken you are.

Dress code
This is a no-brainer. Dress appropriately. No one wants to see you just out of bed, in a T-shirt, or wearing exercise gear. You are interviewing for a professional degree!

Express yourself
The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality. Stations can be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc. Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!

Generally speaking, the medical schools will be looking for the following skills and attributes from applicants:

  1. Knowledge relevant to the question and your ability to formulate an approach to address the topic
  2. The capacity to draw implications from your knowledge
  3. Insight into you own attitudes and views (and that of others) relevant to the issue

If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.

Whether this is your first interview or your fiftieth, a little preparation and confidence can go a long way! Remember to keep these tips in mind and to just be yourself. And finally, don’t forget to thank the interviewers for taking the time to meet with you and for the opportunity to participate.

Best of luck!

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If you have any questions regarding your Australian medical school interview, please contact OzTREKK’s Med Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Sydney Medical School’s long history of training students in rural NSW is boosting local economies and the number of graduates who want to work as rural doctors.

“Rural training experience increases the likelihood that doctors will commit to working in rural locations long term,” said Professor Conigrave. “This is why we have had a longstanding commitment to the training of rural doctors for more than 20 years.”

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Learn more about Sydney Medical School

The University of Sydney has a School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural Health in Broken Hill and Lismore.

“By the end of 2017, almost 1,000 of our medical students will have undertaken extended training placements in these four centres,” said Professor Conigrave.

“At graduation, these students are telling us that they would prefer to work in rural areas. The government’s new funding for the rural doctor training ‘pipeline’ will help these students to achieve their ambitions and their talents for rural health and medicine.”

However, Professor Conigrave said that there were not enough medical training positions to convert students’ intentions into medical careers in rural areas.

“We’re doing very well in priming the pipeline for the training of rural doctors—many more new medical graduates are now trying to get jobs in rural hospitals as interns. In fact, there are now significantly more applicants for these critical rural junior hospital training jobs than there are jobs available.”

Underlining the university’s contribution to rural economies, Professor Conigrave said, “We have a track record of excellence in rural medical education and we are making significant contributions to local economies.”

“At Dubbo and Orange, for example, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health contributes close to $7 million each year in direct local expenditures.

“This provide jobs for more than 50 people in central western NSW, all of whom live locally—they make up almost 30 full-time equivalents. Many of them are highly skilled, and might otherwise have been obliged to look elsewhere for work,” said Professor Conigrave.

“Then, of course, there are also indirect economic benefits. The 64 students that take extended rural placements each year bring business to local shops, sporting facilities and food outlets, and contribute to community life and projects of all sorts.

“In addition, the School of Rural Health requires many local services: motor vehicles, IT, transport services, plumbing, the maintenance of grounds and even the paint on the walls.

“But most importantly, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural in Broken Hill and Lismore are helping to lift access to quality healthcare among Australians in rural and remote areas,” added Professor Conigrave.

In April, the University of Sydney won $3 million in federal funds to establish Rural Training Hubs in Broken Hill, Dubbo and Lismore to boost rural-based training and career pathways for trainee doctors.

Commenting on the award of funding Professor Conigrave said, “We’re very pleased that the Federal Government has recognised the need to create this training pipeline.

“The funding will enable junior doctors with ambitions in rural medicine to undertake specialist training in rural rather than metropolitan centres, developing into fully fledged experts who can provide rural communities with specialist healthcare in all major fields of medicine, including general practice and rural and remote medicine and surgery.”

Study medicine at the #1 medical school in Australia

Did you know the University of Sydney Medical School is ranked #15 in the world and #1 in Australia (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017)? It’s true!

Sydney offers the very popular MD program, a four-year professional postgraduate-entry course with three primary aims for graduates: excellent clinical skills and preparedness for practice; experience in research; and experience and awareness of health in an international setting. It includes weekly clinical experience in leading hospitals from the very first weeks, regular PBL (problem-based learning) exercises in small groups, traditional lectures with expert practitioners, and ongoing opportunities to participate in research.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales (Camperdown/Darlington campus)
Semester intake: January 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 20, 2017
Deadline to submit all documents: Monday, June 26, 2017
Skype interview invitations sent: mid-July
Skype interviews: July 31 – August 11, 2017
First-round offers made: from late August (and may continue to be made until December 2017)

Apply now to Sydney Medical School!

If you have any questions about Sydney Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

Don’t miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal.

Don't miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Finding out what comes after medical school is also a very big deal. To help make the process a little smoother, OzTREKK hosts medical licensing webinars to assist future Australian medical school students to understand the ins and outs of returning to Canada as an international medical graduate. And the first one will be held tomorrow, April 6, at 7 p.m. EDT! During the webinar, you will learn more about

  • the Australian Medical School systems and structure
  • Australian med school rankings
  • medical degree titles such as MD and MBBS
  • Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE), MCCQE1 and MCCQE2
  • the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) program and rates
  • provincially specific programs available to international medical graduates
  • the latest information on the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor;
  • information about the licensing examinations in Canada and the US, what they are, when you need to sit them, and the application process; and
  • the latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia.

…and much more!

Medical Licensing Webinars Schedule

OzTREKK students are invited to attend as many webinars as they wish!

Webinar #1
Date: Thursday, April 6, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #2
Date: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #3
Date: Wednesday, June 14, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #4
Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #5
Date: Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #6
Date: Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Please note the medical licensing webinars are extremely popular and are by invitation only. If you are an OzTREKK student, you and your family will be invited to one of the licensing seminars.

Learn more about studying at an Australian Medical School!

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Would you like more information about the upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinars? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Australian medical school rankings 2017

Why do so many Canadians consider studying at an Australian medical school?

Austrlian medical school rankings 2017

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Because Australian and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Medical schools in Australia offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting. Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their high world rankings! The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2017 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2017

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
15th University of Sydney
11th University of Toronto
19th University of Melbourne
22nd McGill University
29th Monash University
27th University of British Columbia
42nd University of Queensland
35th McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian Medical Schools in top 50)
QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2017

Undergraduate- versus Graduate-entry Medical Programs

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Graduate Entry: Some Australian Medical Schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.

The following Australian medical schools offer a medical program at a graduate-entry level, which are similar to those medical programs offered in Canada and the United States:

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For more information about applying to Australian medical schools, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Are you considering applying to Australian Medical Schools? Then you’ll probably want to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is administered multiple times from late January through early September, and offered at hundreds of test sites in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Don’t forget to study! (Photo: Monash University)

The following graduate-entry medical programs require applicants to sit a medical admission test such as the MCAT:

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application.

All deadlines are at 11:59 PM ET on the day of the deadline.

Test date Score release date
March 31 May 2
April 22 May 23
April 28 May 30
May 13 June 13
May 18 June 20
May 19 June 20
June 1 July 6
June 16 July 18
June 17 July 18
June 29 Aug. 1
June 30 Aug. 1
July 21 Aug. 22
July 22 Aug. 22
July 27 Aug. 29
July 28 Aug. 29
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 11 Sept. 12
August 18 Sept. 19
August 19 Sept. 19
August 24 Sept. 26
August 25 Sept. 26

The first three sections organized around 10 foundational concepts in the sciences (biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, general chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology). In the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section, students are asked to analyze, evaluate, and apply information provided by passages from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines.

  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

Register to write the MCAT.

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

Wondering about when you need to write the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Five reasons to study at Sydney Medical School

Why should you join Australia’s top medical school? Sydney Medical School is ranked number one in Australia and 17 globally in the QS World University Rankings, but that’s not the only reason why students from all over the world come to Sydney Uni to study medicine.

Five reasons to study at Sydney Medical School

Meet Sydney Med School reps at the upcoming seminar!

1. Early patient care

You’ll begin your medical studies with hands-on experience in a structured, supervised way over years 1 and 2, which means you’ll be well prepared for when you transfer to clinical schools in Stage 3 (years 3 and 4).

“A great strength of the course is that you get to enter the clinical world right from your first week of your first year,” explained Co-Director of the Sydney Medical Program Professor Inam Haq.

2. Teaching hospitals

Clinical training is offered at an extensive network of top-tier hospitals across New South Wales that offer the most advanced healthcare in the country, including Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Westmead Hospital and the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, to name just a few.

“The clinical training component of your medical degree will take place at one of our many fantastic clinical schools across Sydney. Whichever one you’re placed at you will have a fantastic experience with dedicated teachers and support staff to help you in your studies,” said Professor Haq.

3. Research training

If you study medicine at Sydney, you will have access to world-leading researchers, research institutes and networks. You will gain formal training in research methods in your first year, encompassing the basic principles of health and medical research, research governance and ethics, and the basics of research methods in biomedical, clinical and public health.

“Our lecturers are world leaders in their fields, and the University of Sydney has deeply entrenched roots in research. They’ve been able to show us that research and clinical exposure go hand in hand, and so I have peers who are working intensely on research projects who will be the next face of medicine,” Sean Hassan, a Stage 4 medical (and OzTREKK!) student said.

4. Rural experience

With campuses in Dubbo and Orange, as well as departments in Broken Hill and Lismore, our School of Rural Health provides clinical placements throughout central, northern and western NSW. We also work in partnership with the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia.

“Medicine students at the University of Sydney have the option to go rural for a whole year. Everyone has something amazing to say about it, and lots of students tend to go back. That definitely made me want to come here,” said Lakshmi Sunderasan, a Stage 2 medical student.

5. Overseas opportunities

With extensive international connections, both across Asia-Pacific and in major research centres in North America and Europe, Sydney encourages its medical students to participate in an international elective.

You can take undertake a four- to eight-week clinical or research placement during your elective term. Many Sydney Medical School students also undertake optional overseas placements during the year-end break to places like Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Sweden and Vietnam.

Don’t miss the Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars

Find out why the University of Sydney is one of the top universities in the world! Enjoy refreshments, speak with Sydney Uni representatives and alumni, and learn more about what happens after graduation and the accreditation process so you can practice in Canada!

Don’t forget to RSVP!

Dalhousie University
Date: January 23, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: Council Chambers, SUB

University of Toronto
Date: January 24, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: MB128, Lassonde Mining Building

Western University
Date: January 25, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: McKellar Room, UCC

University of Calgary
Date: January 26, 2017
Time: 12:10 p.m.
Location: Escalus Room, MacEwan Centre

University of Alberta
Date: January 26, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: ECHA 2-150

University of British Columbia
Date: January 27, 2017
Time: 5:15 p.m.
Location: Performance Theatre, AMS

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Discover more about studying medicine or dentistry at Sydney Uni. Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars January 2017

Have you ever considered studying medicine or dentistry at the University of Sydney in Australia? How can studying in Australia advance your career?

Sydney Medicine Dentistry Seminars January 2017

Don’t forget to RSVP for the Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars

Get your questions answered!

Join OzTREKK and the University of Sydney for the upcoming Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars!

Find out why the University of Sydney is one of the top universities in the world! Enjoy refreshments, speak with Sydney Uni representatives and alumni, and learn more about what happens after graduation and the accreditation process so you can practice in Canada!

Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars

Dalhousie University
Date: January 23, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: Council Chambers, SUB

University of Toronto
Date: January 24, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: MB128, Lassonde Mining Building

Western University
Date: January 25, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: McKellar Room, UCC

University of Calgary
Date: January 26, 2017
Time: 12:10 p.m.
Location: Escalus Room, MacEwan Centre

University of Alberta
Date: January 26, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: ECHA 2-150

University of British Columbia
Date: January 27, 2017
Time: 5:15 p.m.
Location: Performance Theatre, AMS

Don’t forget to RSVP!

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Discover more about studying medicine or dentistry at Sydney Uni. Please let us know if you have questions about these information sessions! Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

University of Sydney commits $60 million as first phase of $500M investment

The brightest minds will be brought together as part of a historic partnership agreement between the University of Sydney and Westmead precinct partners announced recently.

The partnership includes an initial commitment by the University of Sydney to contribute more than $60 million of funding for new education facilities, upgrades to existing spaces, and a suite of new academic programs and initiatives, in addition to its existing staffing contribution of $35 million per year at Westmead.

This increased contribution to the partnership will help ensure that clinicians, students and researchers at Westmead Hospital, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead Institute for Medical Research and the Children’s Medical Research Institute will be able to continue to meet the needs of the expanding population and increasing health needs of Western Sydney, New South Wales and beyond.

The new facilities and programs will support the expanded expertise and educational opportunities available on the precinct in areas like data sciences, engineering, physics, business management, the social sciences and others.

NSW Health Minister the Hon Jillian Skinner was present at the announcement and welcomed the partnership agreement.

University of Sydney commits $60 million as first phase of $500-million investment

Sydney students to receive a boost in facilities and programs (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

“I congratulate the University of Sydney and all the Westmead precinct partners on this great partnership.  Students all across Westmead—who are our clinicians and researchers of the future—will enjoy the contemporary, flexible technology-enabled teaching, learning and working spaces that are being built as part of this partnership,” Jillian Skinner said.

The University of Sydney investment includes capital funding for

  • 5,000m2 across two floors of the Westmead Redevelopment’s new acute services building, to become the central location of the University of Sydney’s Westmead Campus;
  • an upgrade and expansion of the current Westmead Education and Conference Centre, within Westmead Hospital, to provide innovative and versatile learning environments;
  • refurbishment of student facilities, to improve the student experience at Westmead; and
  • a new simulation ward, which provides facilities for educating students in nursing, medicine and allied health, and training staff at Westmead Hospital and The Children’s Hospital at Westmead.

The university spaces will also be available for use by other precinct partners, giving them access to contemporary education facilities that are not currently available at Westmead.

The university is also working with the Westmead precinct partners to develop the proposal for the Westmead Innovation Centre. The Innovation Centre will be collecting and generating ideas and new solutions from patients, clinicians, researchers and other innovators and will be fostering a culture of innovation and knowledge sharing.

“This is such an important part of the university’s work in Western Sydney. A key focus of the next era of strategic growth for the University of Sydney will be in—and for—Western Sydney, and this is the early phase of what we anticipate will be a $500m investment over the next 15 years. Importantly, this investment will help us build on the university’s areas of strength with its partners at Westmead,” University of Sydney Vice-Chancellor Dr Michael Spence said.

Welcoming the investment and the university’s role in helping address the healthcare challenges of the future, WSLHD Chief Executive Danny O’Connor said, “Westmead Hospital and the University of Sydney have had a long-standing partnership, dating back to the official opening of the hospital in 1978. This expanded commitment from the university means a greater opportunity to collect and generate ideas and new solutions from students in different disciplines as well as clinicians, researchers, patients and other innovators.”

“Co-locating the education and research activity with the clinical services space means Westmead will extend the quality of its education and research capability for the benefit of our patients and families in Western Sydney and beyond,” said Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network Chief Executive Dr Michael Brydon.

The strength of the precinct partnerships has helped deliver on Westmead’s strong track record as a successful innovator in the delivery of healthcare, research and education and helped attract a talent pool that is now the largest concentration of biomedical, scientific and healthcare focused minds in Australia.

The investment is just one part of the $3.4 billion earmarked by government, universities and the private sector for investment at Westmead over the next decade, including new commercial and residential facilities and development of the Parramatta Light Rail.
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Learn more about studying medicine and  nursing at the University of Sydney!

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

OzTREKK student talks about Sydney Medical School

Current Sydney Medical School student Sean Hassan began his Australian journey in 2012 when he first contacted OzTREKK.

OzTREKK student talks about studying at Sydney Medical School

Former OzTREKK student Sean Hassan at our 2012 pre-dep seminar!

Like most medical students, he wondered which university would be best for him, and so he applied to several Australian medical schools. Unlike most medical students, however, Sean actually studied commerce before deciding on a career in medicine!

It’s amazing to watch our students throughout the process: from their first enquiries, to their applications, to watching them become professionals! We are so pleased for you, Sean!

And trust us when we say time flies: Just recently, Sean delivered a baby.

How does Sydney Medical School help? According to Sean, studying medicine at Sydney has great benefits for their students. Being a Sydney med student means

  • you will be prepared for a general internship;
  • you are encouraged to follow the path you are most passionate about;
  • you are encouraged be the “master of your own medical degree”;
  • you will see Sydney’s strong roots in global health (Sean had the opportunity to do a core rotation in Toronto!);
  • seeing research and clinical exposure go hand in hand;
  • being taught by lecturers who are at the top in their fields.

So how do you know which medical school is for you?

For Sean, the University of Sydney was the right fit. In the video below, Sean explains what he loves about the medical program, and how it has helped shape him into the doctor he wants to become!

About the Sydney Doctor of Medicine Degree

Sydney Medical School aims to produce medical graduates who are committed to rational, compassionate health care and medical research of the highest quality. The Doctor of Medicine program encourages enrollment of students from diverse backgrounds (even commerce!) and aims to help them to become graduates responsive to the health needs of individuals, families and communities and committed to improving the health care system at all levels.

Years 1 & 2 are spent primarily on the main university campus at Camperdown, but clinical training commences in the first weeks. For years 3 & 4, students are based in their clinical school. Clinical learning occurs at multiple widely dispersed sites (hospitals and community, metropolitan, urban and rural).

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If you have any questions about Sydney Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.