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Articles categorized as ‘Monash University Medical School’

Friday, August 25th, 2017

Monash research team trials virtual reality to help children during medical procedures

Needle procedures, including intravenous cannulas and blood tests, can be extremely distressing for many children and can lead to lifelong anxiety.

Monash University and Monash Children’s Hospital researchers are conducting the world’s largest study of virtual reality headsets to improve the experience of children undergoing needle procedures.

Monash research team trialling virtual reality to help children during medical procedures

Dr Evelyn Chan, patient Nia Ashton and Dr Erin Mills (Photo: Monash University)

For the first time, a collaborative research team led by Monash University Research Fellow Dr Evelyn Chan, is investigating the use of virtual reality (VR) headsets to reduce fear, pain and anxiety associated with these procedures.

Dr Chan said current pain management techniques such as local anaesthetic cream or distraction were inadequate for some children, and may result in the need for restraints and/or sedation.

“The VR headsets distract children, allowing them to experience and interact with animated sea-life, including fish, dolphins and whales, while medical staff take blood or insert an intravenous cannula,” Dr Chan said.

The VR animations have been created to perfectly coincide with the procedures being carried out.

“Children ‘feel’ the water while a nurse or doctor prepares and cleans their hand, and fish gently bite at their hand while a needle is inserted,” Dr Chan said.

Principal Investigator at Monash Children’s Hospital, Dr Erin Mills, said VR allowed children to be transported into an engaging and interactive 3D ‘virtual world’ which provided an escape from the real world where the procedure was being performed.

“The virtual reality experience has been designed to be immersive, enjoyable and help relax and reassure the child while medical procedures are taking place,” Dr Mills said.

Dr Chan said their vision was for every child to have access to high quality needle pain management, anytime, anywhere—whether they were in a world-class kid’s hospital, a busy pathology clinic, or a remote GP practice.

“VR has huge potential to transform patient experiences. One day VR might become a cornerstone of patient care—helping support patients in every step of their health journey, from being able to walk through the operating room before their surgery, to supporting them through their hospital stay, and helping them during recovery with rehab and preventive health activities,” Dr Chan said.

Two-hundred-forty patients from the Pathology and the Emergency Departments at Monash Children’s Hospital are currently being recruited to the study. The Royal Children’s Hospital will open an arm of the study next month.

More than 30,000 patients presented to Monash Children’s Hospital Emergency Department in the last 12 months, with 4,500 requiring blood tests.

The Monash research team includes Dr Erin Mills, Associate Professor Simon Craig, Dr Simon Cohen, Emma Ramage, Samantha Foster, Ryan Sambell, Michael Hovenden, Dr Evelyn Chan, and Dr Paul Leong.

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Learn more about the new medical degree at Monash Medical School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Team at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

We know that applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal, and one of the most stress-inducing parts of the process can be the interview portion!

Being prepared and having an idea of the types of questions you may be asked will certainly pay off and help you to feel more comfortable. During your medical school interview, you may encounter questions ranging from the basics like your work history and volunteer experience to more situational and behavioral questions. Here are some ways to help you rock your Australian medical school interview!

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

Are you ready for your medical school interview?

Preparation before the interview

First, what is a multi-mini interview (MMI)?
The MMI is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes. It is designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the school considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment. The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics.

Set a calendar reminder
Your educational future is potentially riding on this interview! As soon as you receive the date and time for your interview, put it in your calendar and set a reminder.

#OzTREKKtip: Don’t ask them to reschedule unless it’s an emergency. Spots fill up extremely quickly and it can be difficult to juggle dozens of applicants. If you truly can’t attend your interview at the specified time, you must contact the university’s admissions office as soon as possible. They will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

Have reliable equipment and internet access
You should use the most reliable method of connection available for your interview (e.g., a wired computer connection, where possible.) Wireless connection can be used, provided that it is sufficiently reliable to complete the interview process. Imagine beginning your interview with shady internet connection—yikes!

Don’t have Skype (or the platform they will use)? Get it. Learn about it. Be prepared to know how it works. Especially learn the instant messaging button as this is where you will read the interview questions.

Practice
What is happening in the world? Find someone to discuss what is happening around you. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story. Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Try to avoid confrontation.

Do your homework
Familiarise yourself with the medical school. What is the school known for? Why is that a good fit for you? Are you interested in rural medicine? It’s a good idea to know the medical profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the field of medicine.

Questions, please
If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of medicine.

Who are you?
Do you have weaknesses? What are they? Are you working on them? Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now? What makes you stand out from other applicants? (don’t brag!) Be prepared to talk about your undergrad degree.

During the interview

Be ready early
On the day of your interview, you must be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Your interview will likely last at least 45 minutes; however, you should allow at least one hour in addition to this time in case there is a delay, or there is a need to clarify a matter. Also note that there won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water handy should you need it.

For verification purposes, you must bring photographic identification (passport or driver’s license) to the interview. Have it ready to show at the beginning of your interview. Now is not the time to go fishing through your purse or digging in your wallet.

Quiet on the set!
The last thing you want during an interview is to be distracted. Choose distraction-free place where you will have excellent internet access. Turn. Your. Cellphone. Off.

Listen 
Sometimes it can be hard to concentrate when we’re stressed, and we often blurt out the first thing that pops into our heads. Do your best to really actively listen to what’s being asked so you can answer appropriately.

Try to remain calm and speak at a moderate pace
Take a deep breath. The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you. Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible. If you don’t know how to answer the question, a simple “I’m not sure” is far better than a long-winded lie.

Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff. If an interviewer has a bad first impression about you, the other aspects of that particular station will likely be graded poorly. Remember, the interviewers are people too, and they are likely volunteering in the MMI process. This is especially important if you consider an interviewer may not even be listening to a word you are saying. At the end of the station, the interviewer may look back at the past 7 or so minutes, and depending on how much verbal diarrhea you may have spewed out, they may only remember how calm, collected, and eloquently spoken you are.

Dress code
This is a no-brainer. Dress appropriately. No one wants to see you just out of bed, in a T-shirt, or wearing exercise gear. You are interviewing for a professional degree!

Express yourself
The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality. Stations can be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc. Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!

Generally speaking, the medical schools will be looking for the following skills and attributes from applicants:

  1. Knowledge relevant to the question and your ability to formulate an approach to address the topic
  2. The capacity to draw implications from your knowledge
  3. Insight into you own attitudes and views (and that of others) relevant to the issue

If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.

Whether this is your first interview or your fiftieth, a little preparation and confidence can go a long way! Remember to keep these tips in mind and to just be yourself. And finally, don’t forget to thank the interviewers for taking the time to meet with you and for the opportunity to participate.

Best of luck!

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If you have any questions regarding your Australian medical school interview, please contact OzTREKK’s Med Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

James Cook University is Australia’s Tropical University, and JCU medical graduates are be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

RSVP to meet JCU in Toronto June 22!

Recently, Uni Reviews ranked the top Australian universities for medicine using a formula combining

  • medical school size (student numbers)
  • student and graduate satisfaction with medicine courses (% satisfied)
  • indicative graduate salaries (based on pay, study and unemployment rates).

Medicine includes General Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics, Anaesthesiology, Pathology, Radiology, Internal Medicine and General Practice.

Uni Reviews presents independent reviews, ratings and rankings of Australian universities. Site content is published by UniCurve for the benefit of students.

As listed by Uni Reviews, the top universities for medicine in Australia for 2017 are

  1. James Cook University
  2. University of Western Australia
  3. Monash University

James Cook University

JCU Medicine tops the subject rankings for Medicine in 2017. The program is relatively large (1,155 students), has the highest rate of satisfaction among student and graduates (92%) and produces solid job outcomes ($65,000 indicative graduate salary).

University of Western Australia

The University of Western Australian Medical School is ranked 2nd in Australia for Medicine. The faculty’s medical graduates enjoy the highest salaries in Australia ($68,130) and have a solid rate of course satisfaction (84%).

Monash University

Monash University Medical School is in the top 3 for Australia. The school is the largest in Australia (2,452 students) and is highly rated by students (85% satisfaction).

James Cook University Medicine & Dentistry Seminar

It’s no secret we are huge fans of JCU’s commitment to helping rural and under-served populations. If you are interested in a career in medicine or dentistry, but are looking for something more extraordinary, please join OzTREKK and JCU Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Wronski for this upcoming seminar. Find out why JCU is interested in Canadian students, and how you can help bring better health to those in need.

Toronto
Venue: Pinnacle Room, Sheraton Centre Hotel, Toronto
Date: Thursday, June 22, 2017
Time: 6 – 9 p.m.

Make sure to RSVP to save your spot!

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Discover more about studying JCU Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017

Monash University medical student joins Antarctica expedition to inspire environmental change

A desire to drive sustainable energy use, and love of solving challenging problems has won a Monash University student a prestigious Boston Consulting Group (BCG) scholarship. One of only two scholarships awarded annually in Australia and New Zealand, Daniel D’Hotman will now embark on a trip to Antarctica early next year.

Daniel’s $15,000 scholarship means he joins the last 60 miles (96.6 km) of the 600-mile (966 km) South Pole Energy Challenge (SPEC). Conducted on foot, it’s the first polar expedition to rely completely on renewable energy, and is renowned explorer Robert Swan’s last South Pole voyage.

Monash University medical student joins Antarctica expedition to inspire environmental change

A Monash Medical School student will be embarking on an Antarctic expedition

A fourth-year Monash University Medical School student, Daniel said the South Pole expedition was an amazing opportunity to inspire change in the way we use energy.

“I believe the risk of catastrophic climate change poses a major existential threat to current and future generations—no matter what field you’re in—and I wanted to be part of something that would have a global impact,” Daniel said.

Using this expedition as a platform for engagement, the group wants to challenge and inspire people to make measurable changes to how they use energy in their businesses, communities, and lifestyles. Daniel also plans to work with sponsors, such as Shell and Patagonia, to launch a social impact fund that will drive change in the way we use energy.

“On a personal level,” he said, “I revel in a challenge, and the prospect of walking in the most hostile environment on earth is very exciting.”

This once-in-a-lifetime adventure is only one part of the prize. Daniel will also have the opportunity to work with BCG after graduation.

It’s a prestigious honour, and one that came about after a rigorous selection process involving three rounds of interviews, where BCG sought out high-performing students with strong leadership qualities and a love of “solving challenging problems.”

As a medical student at Monash, Daniel is passionate about mobilising groups of individuals to promote collaboration and engineer societal change. Earlier this year, he led the launch of the philanthropic movement Effective Altruism in Australia, and the charity has raised more than $800,000 for public health interventions in its first year.

While Daniel enjoys clinical medicine and clearly has a passion for the environment, he hopes to pursue a future in public policy to ensure the future equity and sustainability of Australia’s health system.

“My Monash placements in rural Victoria offered insight into the stark contrast in health outcomes between these areas and inner-city Melbourne,” he said. “This prompted my interest in health equity; a person’s health should not be dictated by their postcode.”

After his second year of Monash University Medical School, Daniel completed his Bachelor of Medical Science (Hons) at the University of Oxford, working with philosophers including Monash Professor Julian Savulescu. This experience introduced him to the world of bioethics and policy.

“Oxford really opened my eyes to power of public policy, and inspired me to pursue a career in the field,” he said.

Daniel believes that rising costs of healthcare and an ageing population may threaten the viability of Australia’s health system this century. However, he said that technology could offer powerful solutions.

“Australia is uniquely positioned to take advantage of advances in artificial intelligence, big data, and biotechnology to guarantee the quality of our health system into the future. I’m excited to expand my knowledge of these areas through working at BCG.”

Study Medicine at Monash University

The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine at Monash University has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise to ensure that graduates are prepared for their future as a doctor.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the Monash University medical program!

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Would you like more information about studying at Monash University Medical School? Contact Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

Don’t miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal.

Don't miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Finding out what comes after medical school is also a very big deal. To help make the process a little smoother, OzTREKK hosts medical licensing webinars to assist future Australian medical school students to understand the ins and outs of returning to Canada as an international medical graduate. And the first one will be held tomorrow, April 6, at 7 p.m. EDT! During the webinar, you will learn more about

  • the Australian Medical School systems and structure
  • Australian med school rankings
  • medical degree titles such as MD and MBBS
  • Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE), MCCQE1 and MCCQE2
  • the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) program and rates
  • provincially specific programs available to international medical graduates
  • the latest information on the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor;
  • information about the licensing examinations in Canada and the US, what they are, when you need to sit them, and the application process; and
  • the latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia.

…and much more!

Medical Licensing Webinars Schedule

OzTREKK students are invited to attend as many webinars as they wish!

Webinar #1
Date: Thursday, April 6, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #2
Date: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #3
Date: Wednesday, June 14, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #4
Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #5
Date: Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #6
Date: Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Please note the medical licensing webinars are extremely popular and are by invitation only. If you are an OzTREKK student, you and your family will be invited to one of the licensing seminars.

Learn more about studying at an Australian Medical School!

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Would you like more information about the upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinars? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Australian medical school rankings 2017

Why do so many Canadians consider studying at an Australian medical school?

Austrlian medical school rankings 2017

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Because Australian and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Medical schools in Australia offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting. Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their high world rankings! The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2017 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2017

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
15th University of Sydney
11th University of Toronto
19th University of Melbourne
22nd McGill University
29th Monash University
27th University of British Columbia
42nd University of Queensland
35th McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian Medical Schools in top 50)
QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2017

Undergraduate- versus Graduate-entry Medical Programs

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Graduate Entry: Some Australian Medical Schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.

The following Australian medical schools offer a medical program at a graduate-entry level, which are similar to those medical programs offered in Canada and the United States:

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For more information about applying to Australian medical schools, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Are you considering applying to Australian Medical Schools? Then you’ll probably want to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is administered multiple times from late January through early September, and offered at hundreds of test sites in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Don’t forget to study! (Photo: Monash University)

The following graduate-entry medical programs require applicants to sit a medical admission test such as the MCAT:

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application.

All deadlines are at 11:59 PM ET on the day of the deadline.

Test date Score release date
March 31 May 2
April 22 May 23
April 28 May 30
May 13 June 13
May 18 June 20
May 19 June 20
June 1 July 6
June 16 July 18
June 17 July 18
June 29 Aug. 1
June 30 Aug. 1
July 21 Aug. 22
July 22 Aug. 22
July 27 Aug. 29
July 28 Aug. 29
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 11 Sept. 12
August 18 Sept. 19
August 19 Sept. 19
August 24 Sept. 26
August 25 Sept. 26

The first three sections organized around 10 foundational concepts in the sciences (biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, general chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology). In the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section, students are asked to analyze, evaluate, and apply information provided by passages from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines.

  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

Register to write the MCAT.

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

Wondering about when you need to write the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke

Melburnians are taking part in a world-first trial led by Monash University that could see a simple one-off vaccination protect against heart attack and stroke.

The trial, which started late last year, aims to determine whether the pneumococcal vaccine can reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke by up to 20 per cent. Observational studies indicate the injection can lead to a 17 per cent protection against cardiovascular disease, but this is the first large scale study to be conducted.

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke

Professor Andrew Tonkin and Dr Ingrid Hopper (Photo: Monash University)

The Australian Study for the Prevention through Immunisation of Cardiovascular Events (AUSPICE) trial is being coordinated by the Centre for Cardiovascular Research and Education in Therapeutics (CCRET) within the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SPHPM). The trial is led by Principal Investigator Professor Andrew Tonkin and assisted by Dr Ingrid Hopper and will be based at Caulfield Hospital.

AUSPICE is recruiting up to 3,000 men and women aged 55 to 60 years across six centres in Melbourne, Newcastle, Gosford, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth.

The study will formally test whether the existing pneumococcal vaccine can not only reduce invasive pneumococcal disease but also help to prevent heart attack and stroke. The pneumococcal vaccine protects against diseases such as meningitis and is currently free under the National Immunise Australia Program for people over 65, children and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and children.

According to Dr Hopper, if the trial proves to be successful it will signify a major change in preventative health practice globally.

“If shown to be effective, it would be relatively easy to incorporate changes into clinical practice because the pneumococcal vaccine is safe and has already been used in Australia for over 20 years in a different target group,” Dr Hopper said.

Victorian volunteers, aged 60–64, are asked to attend a single clinic at the Caulfield Clinical Trials Centre in Melbourne, for less than one hour. People with at least two risk factors for heart disease—high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or overweight/obesity—will be randomised to receive either the active vaccine or a saline placebo.

This collaboration between Monash University, the University of Newcastle, Australian National University, Flinders University and The University of Western Australia comprises a large multidisciplinary team including cardiologists, epidemiologists, neurologists, nurse immunisers, pharmacists, public health and medicine physicians and biostatisticians.

The researchers will link, via the Federal Department of Health hospital admission records, the incidence of cardiovascular disease requiring hospitalisation among those who received the vaccine and those who received the placebo.

Study Public Health at Monash University

The Master of Public Health at Monash is a 12-unit program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the university to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

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Study Medicine at Monash University

The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine at Monash University has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise to ensure that graduates are prepared for their future as a doctor.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the graduate Monash medical program

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Would you like more information about studying at the Monash University School of Public Health, contact Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

For more info about studying at Monash Medical School, please contact Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Apply to the new Monash University medical program!

The new combined Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine degree has replaced the Monash University Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Honours) MBBS program as of 2017 entry. The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine (MD) is an internationally recognised, higher-level qualification and has been accredited by the Australian Medical Association.

Apply to the Monash University medical program!

Learn more about the Monash University medical program!

This new Monash medical program has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors in order to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise needed for a successful career as a doctor.

Students who commence the Monash MD will undertake a Scholarly Intensive Project in the final year of the course. Medical students will undertake traditional research activities as well having the opportunity to increase learning opportunities around clinical and professional practice.

Monash will continue to offer the 5-year direct-entry medical program (from high school), as well as the 4-year graduate-entry program, with the same number of places available in both courses.

Interview Dates for Canadian applicants
September 4 & 5, 2017 (Toronto)
September 7 & 8, 2017 (Vancouver)

Dates are subject to change.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (undergraduate entry)
Location: Clayton campus, Melbourne
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the undergrad Monash medical program

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the graduate Monash medical program

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Find out more about the new Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

Poutine, snow, and Monash Medical School seminars

It’s not all that often that we get an Australian university faculty visit in our tiny town of Perth! OzTREKK recently had the pleasure of hosting Julie Baxter and Kerri Mott from the Monash Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, visiting Canada for the first time for the Monash Medical School seminars and interviews.

Poutine, snow, and Monash Medical School seminars

Julie Baxter and Kerri Mott, and their first Eastern Ontario snowfall!

Jaime had the chance to take them out on the town and out to a local pub, O’Reilly’s. Here, Kerri and Julie got the chance to chow down on some regular Canadian poutine, which they quite enjoyed!

Not only was this their first time making the trip to Perth, and getting into some poutine, they had another “first” while here, too. It ended up snowing on Oct. 27, which is crazy, but I think they both really enjoyed it! Amanda had actually advised Julie a few weeks back that simply bringing along a “light jacket” would do. Surprise!

The Monash ladies arrived in the OzTREKK office the next morning bundled up from their walk over. After getting down to medical school business, the whole office sat down for some morning tea!

After tea and visiting, we were well into the afternoon and the ladies had to head out to catch their train! I think it’s definitely possible that Kerri and Julie may make the trip back again—hopefully with some better weather for them next time, perhaps more permanently as there was talk of peeking in local real estate office windows!

We would be happy to welcome them back any time!

Courtney Frank
Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer

Monash Medical School Information Sessions

Discover more about your study options! Monash Medical School and OzTREKK are pleased invite you to the medicine info sessions being held in Toronto and Vancouver, November 1 and 3.

Experience world-class education taught by one of the best medical schools in the world. Find out how by attending a Monash Medical School seminar this November. Be sure to RSVP!

University of Toronto
Date: Nov. 1, 2016
Time: 7 p.m.

University of British Columbia
Date: Nov. 3, 2016
Time: 7 p.m.

RSVP: http://study.oztrekk.com/monash-medicine-nov-2016/

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For more information about these seminars and about the new medical degree at Monash Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.