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Articles categorized as ‘University of Melbourne Medical School’

Wednesday, December 20th, 2017

When do I have to write the MCAT in 2018?

The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a standardized, multiple-choice examination designed to assess the examinee’s problem solving, critical thinking, and knowledge of science concepts and principles prerequisite to the study of medicine.

If you would like to apply to an Australian medical school for the 2019 intake, you’ll be required to sit the MCAT, as it is a prerequisite for most medical programs. That means you’ll have to pay attention test dates and the score release dates!

When do I have to write the MCAT in 2018?

When should you write the MCAT: Applying to an Australian medical school

Applying to an Australian medical school? You’ll need to sit the MCAT!

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application to medical schools in Australia!

Test Date  Score Release+
January 19 Feb. 23
January 25 Feb. 27
April 20 May 22
April 21 May 22
May 18 June 19
May 19 June 19
June 1 July 3
June 2 July 3
June 16 July 17
June 29 July 31
June 30 July 31
July 7 Aug. 7
July 20 Aug. 21
July 21 Aug. 21
July 24 Aug. 23
August 2 Sept. 5
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 9 Sept. 11
August 10 Sept. 11
August 16 Sept. 18
August 18 Sept. 18
August 25 Sept. 25
August 31 Oct. 2
September 1 Oct. 2
September 8 Oct. 9
September 14 Oct. 16
September 15 Oct. 16
September 18 Oct. 23
September 19 Oct. 23

 

MCAT dates for graduate-entry Australian medical programs for 2017 intake

Since not all of our Australian university partners have released the application deadlines for the 2019 intake, we aren’t able list the exact cutoff date to sit the MCAT just yet. Please use the list below (2018 intake dates) as a guide.

Griffith University Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: September 27, 2017; however, applications are assessed on a rolling admissions basis (first come, first served). The sooner you apply the better, as this program can fill quickly.
Last date to sit MCAT: August 25, 2017

James Cook University Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery
Application deadline: August 30, 2017; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.
Last date to sit MCAT: MCAT not required!

Macquarie University Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: October 5, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: August 25, 2017

Monash University Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science / Doctor of Medicine (Graduate Entry)
Application deadline: October 5, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: MCAT not required!

University of Melbourne Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: July 22, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: May 19, 2017

University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions basis (first come, first served). The sooner you apply the better as this program can fill quickly.
Last date to sit MCAT: Candidates are encouraged to sit the MCAT as early as possible.

University of Sydney Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: June 20, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: May 19, 2017

University of Western Australia Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Application deadline: May 30, 2017
Last date to sit MCAT: April 22, 2017

For complete details about the MCAT, please visit the official MCAT website.

Entering an Australian medical school straight from high school?

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

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Would you like more details about studying medicine in Australia and about the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com for more information.

 

Friday, December 8th, 2017

About the Canadian Resident Matching Service

What is the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS)?

About the Canadian Resident Matching Service

Learn more about studying at a medical school in Australia

The Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) is an impartial, not-for-profit organization that provides a fair and transparent online process to match medical students and residents with medical residency positions throughout Canada.

Using the Match Algorithm, CaRMS matches more than 3,500 applicants each year to postgraduate medical training programs in Canada through four residency matches.

The R-1 Main Residency Match (R-1 match) for entry-level postgraduate positions is CaRMS’ largest match. It is also open to graduates from international medical schools who meet the basic criteria and have no prior postgraduate training in Canada or the US. If you have graduated from a medical school in Australia, you need to apply to CaRMS if you want a medical residency in Canada. Australian medical school graduates who have applied for a residency in the match have fared very well in the past. In fact, according to CaRMS, Australian medical graduates have the best match rates returning to Canada than any other region in the world!

Why do Canadian Australian medical graduates have such a high match rate?

  • Medical training at a world-class educational institution
  • Closest medical education system compared to Canada
  • Similar health care issues to Canada, reflected in their curriculum and training
  • Cultural alignment between our countries

Every year, OzTREKK assists hundreds of Canadian students choose the right Australian medical school program. We understand admissions requirements and application procedures to Australian medical schools, and we can guide you through the differences between undergraduate streams and graduate-entry streams, and the considerations for practicing medicine following graduation.

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. We’re here to help—every step of the way!

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

We know that applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal, and one of the most stress-inducing parts of the process can be the interview portion!

Being prepared and having an idea of the types of questions you may be asked will certainly pay off and help you to feel more comfortable. During your medical school interview, you may encounter questions ranging from the basics like your work history and volunteer experience to more situational and behavioral questions. Here are some ways to help you rock your Australian medical school interview!

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

Are you ready for your medical school interview?

Preparation before the interview

First, what is a multi-mini interview (MMI)?
The MMI is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes. It is designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the school considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment. The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics.

Set a calendar reminder
Your educational future is potentially riding on this interview! As soon as you receive the date and time for your interview, put it in your calendar and set a reminder.

#OzTREKKtip: Don’t ask them to reschedule unless it’s an emergency. Spots fill up extremely quickly and it can be difficult to juggle dozens of applicants. If you truly can’t attend your interview at the specified time, you must contact the university’s admissions office as soon as possible. They will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

Have reliable equipment and internet access
You should use the most reliable method of connection available for your interview (e.g., a wired computer connection, where possible.) Wireless connection can be used, provided that it is sufficiently reliable to complete the interview process. Imagine beginning your interview with shady internet connection—yikes!

Don’t have Skype (or the platform they will use)? Get it. Learn about it. Be prepared to know how it works. Especially learn the instant messaging button as this is where you will read the interview questions.

Practice
What is happening in the world? Find someone to discuss what is happening around you. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story. Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Try to avoid confrontation.

Do your homework
Familiarise yourself with the medical school. What is the school known for? Why is that a good fit for you? Are you interested in rural medicine? It’s a good idea to know the medical profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the field of medicine.

Questions, please
If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of medicine.

Who are you?
Do you have weaknesses? What are they? Are you working on them? Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now? What makes you stand out from other applicants? (don’t brag!) Be prepared to talk about your undergrad degree.

During the interview

Be ready early
On the day of your interview, you must be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Your interview will likely last at least 45 minutes; however, you should allow at least one hour in addition to this time in case there is a delay, or there is a need to clarify a matter. Also note that there won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water handy should you need it.

For verification purposes, you must bring photographic identification (passport or driver’s license) to the interview. Have it ready to show at the beginning of your interview. Now is not the time to go fishing through your purse or digging in your wallet.

Quiet on the set!
The last thing you want during an interview is to be distracted. Choose distraction-free place where you will have excellent internet access. Turn. Your. Cellphone. Off.

Listen 
Sometimes it can be hard to concentrate when we’re stressed, and we often blurt out the first thing that pops into our heads. Do your best to really actively listen to what’s being asked so you can answer appropriately.

Try to remain calm and speak at a moderate pace
Take a deep breath. The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you. Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible. If you don’t know how to answer the question, a simple “I’m not sure” is far better than a long-winded lie.

Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff. If an interviewer has a bad first impression about you, the other aspects of that particular station will likely be graded poorly. Remember, the interviewers are people too, and they are likely volunteering in the MMI process. This is especially important if you consider an interviewer may not even be listening to a word you are saying. At the end of the station, the interviewer may look back at the past 7 or so minutes, and depending on how much verbal diarrhea you may have spewed out, they may only remember how calm, collected, and eloquently spoken you are.

Dress code
This is a no-brainer. Dress appropriately. No one wants to see you just out of bed, in a T-shirt, or wearing exercise gear. You are interviewing for a professional degree!

Express yourself
The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality. Stations can be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc. Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!

Generally speaking, the medical schools will be looking for the following skills and attributes from applicants:

  1. Knowledge relevant to the question and your ability to formulate an approach to address the topic
  2. The capacity to draw implications from your knowledge
  3. Insight into you own attitudes and views (and that of others) relevant to the issue

If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.

Whether this is your first interview or your fiftieth, a little preparation and confidence can go a long way! Remember to keep these tips in mind and to just be yourself. And finally, don’t forget to thank the interviewers for taking the time to meet with you and for the opportunity to participate.

Best of luck!

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If you have any questions regarding your Australian medical school interview, please contact OzTREKK’s Med Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

Recently, more than 1,200 medicine, nursing, dentistry, physiotherapy, audiology, biomedical, science, speech pathology and social work students from the University of Melbourne ran a Teddy Bear Hospital (TBH) to raise funds for the Royal Children’s Hospital Good Friday appeal.

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

Students aimed to reduce children’s fears associated with medical environments, procedures and professionals by familiarising them with health care in a fun, relaxed and interactive manner.

These interactions give future young doctors and health care professionals an excellent opportunity to further develop the specific communication and engagement skills required to successfully interact with children.

The students offered Teddy medical consultations to more than 5,000 children, making TBH the largest student volunteer event run by the University of Melbourne.

Professor Cheryl Jones, Stevenson Chair of Paediatrics and Head of the Department of Paediatrics in the Melbourne Medical School said students learn so much more when working as a team.

“The Teddy Professors from the university’s Department of Paediatrics who oversee this student-led program, are amazed at the passion and creativity of the students as they work together to create the toy machines and instruments for the day, and plan and execute this major event,” she said. “Apart from the fun and fundraising, our students learn more about each other’s multidisciplinary roles and provide practical advice to children and families about how to keep healthy and reduce children’s anxiety about medical environments, procedures and professionals.

“We are very proud to watch this group of students as they are our future health leaders of tomorrow,” Professor Jones said.

Children are asked to bring in a “sick” teddy bear or other toy for treatment at the “hospital.” There are many stations, including teddy triage, teddy doctor consultation, radiology, surgery, and anatomy. There are dedicated student volunteers to design and build the activities and equipment that are used inside the hospital.

Medical student coordinator Elliott Cope believes taking part in the TBH has improved his communication skills, leadership and confidence in interacting with children.

“One of the most memorable interactions was with a four-year-old boy who bought in his dragon teddy bear. The complaint: his dragon had stopped breathing fire,” he said.

Not having much experience with dragon medicine, Elliott was a little stumped, but after a look in the dragon’s throat and a feel of the neck, he diagnosed a dragon cold. After a good night’s sleep and lots of rest, the dragon was back to breathing fire and feeling much better.

University of Melbourne Doctor of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 22, 2017

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the university’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

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Questions about Melbourne Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

Don’t miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal.

Don't miss the upcoming medical licensing webinars

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Finding out what comes after medical school is also a very big deal. To help make the process a little smoother, OzTREKK hosts medical licensing webinars to assist future Australian medical school students to understand the ins and outs of returning to Canada as an international medical graduate. And the first one will be held tomorrow, April 6, at 7 p.m. EDT! During the webinar, you will learn more about

  • the Australian Medical School systems and structure
  • Australian med school rankings
  • medical degree titles such as MD and MBBS
  • Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE), MCCQE1 and MCCQE2
  • the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) program and rates
  • provincially specific programs available to international medical graduates
  • the latest information on the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor;
  • information about the licensing examinations in Canada and the US, what they are, when you need to sit them, and the application process; and
  • the latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia.

…and much more!

Medical Licensing Webinars Schedule

OzTREKK students are invited to attend as many webinars as they wish!

Webinar #1
Date: Thursday, April 6, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #2
Date: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #3
Date: Wednesday, June 14, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #4
Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #5
Date: Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Webinar #6
Date: Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)

Please note the medical licensing webinars are extremely popular and are by invitation only. If you are an OzTREKK student, you and your family will be invited to one of the licensing seminars.

Learn more about studying at an Australian Medical School!

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Would you like more information about the upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinars? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Australian medical school rankings 2017

Why do so many Canadians consider studying at an Australian medical school?

Austrlian medical school rankings 2017

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Because Australian and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Medical schools in Australia offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting. Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their high world rankings! The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2017 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2017

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
15th University of Sydney
11th University of Toronto
19th University of Melbourne
22nd McGill University
29th Monash University
27th University of British Columbia
42nd University of Queensland
35th McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian Medical Schools in top 50)
QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2017

Undergraduate- versus Graduate-entry Medical Programs

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Graduate Entry: Some Australian Medical Schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.

The following Australian medical schools offer a medical program at a graduate-entry level, which are similar to those medical programs offered in Canada and the United States:

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For more information about applying to Australian medical schools, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Are you considering applying to Australian Medical Schools? Then you’ll probably want to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is administered multiple times from late January through early September, and offered at hundreds of test sites in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Don’t forget to study! (Photo: Monash University)

The following graduate-entry medical programs require applicants to sit a medical admission test such as the MCAT:

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application.

All deadlines are at 11:59 PM ET on the day of the deadline.

Test date Score release date
March 31 May 2
April 22 May 23
April 28 May 30
May 13 June 13
May 18 June 20
May 19 June 20
June 1 July 6
June 16 July 18
June 17 July 18
June 29 Aug. 1
June 30 Aug. 1
July 21 Aug. 22
July 22 Aug. 22
July 27 Aug. 29
July 28 Aug. 29
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 11 Sept. 12
August 18 Sept. 19
August 19 Sept. 19
August 24 Sept. 26
August 25 Sept. 26

The first three sections organized around 10 foundational concepts in the sciences (biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, general chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology). In the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section, students are asked to analyze, evaluate, and apply information provided by passages from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines.

  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

Register to write the MCAT.

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

Wondering about when you need to write the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017

University of Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push

People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push for a long-awaited research breakthrough to develop treatments that for the first time could prevent or mitigate this disabling and potentially life-threatening condition. The University of Melbourne, in partnership with the Royal Melbourne Hospital, is the only Australian institution to take part in the project, funded by one of the largest grants to date awarded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research into the elusive condition.

Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push

People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push (Photo: University of Melbourne)

Some 250,000 Australians suffer from epilepsy, the causes of which range from tumours to infections, genetics, hemorrhages or stroke, in addition to brain trauma.

Principal Investigator neurologist Terry O’Brien said epilepsy caused by traumatic brain injury, the major cause of epilepsy in people aged 15–24, is harder to predict and control than many other forms of epilepsy.

“Up to 20 per cent of people who’ve had a traumatic brain injury will develop epilepsy, yet researchers know very little about why, and have no way to prevent or mitigate it,” Professor O’Brien said.

“It’s the nasty sting in the tail for people who’ve got through a difficult rehabilitation, only to be hit by their first seizure just when they think they’re on the mend—anywhere from six months to two years after they were first injured.

“More than a third of these patients’ seizures can’t be controlled by drugs.”

Professor O’Brien—who is the James Stewart Chair of Medicine and Head of the Department of Medicine (Royal Melbourne Hospital) at The University of Melbourne—said the key to Melbourne’s appeal to be invited to be part of this international research collaboration was its location in the Parkville Precinct.

“Being in the Parkville Precinct will enable clinicians and researchers from disciplines such as neuroscience, electrophysiology, imaging, bioinformatics and molecular biology to work very closely together, at the Melbourne Brain Centre and the Royal Melbourne Trauma Centre and ICU.”

The project, one of three NIH Epilepsy Centres without Walls, will be led by researchers at five institutions—the University of Melbourne, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, and the University of Eastern Finland.

About Melbourne Medical School

The Melbourne Medical School is part of the Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health Sciences. It is the oldest medical school in Australia and internationally renowned for global leadership in teaching and training, health research, policy and practice. The school encompasses all major fields of medicine and rural health.

Renowned for global leadership in health research, policy and practice, the University of Melbourne educates more health professionals than any other university in Australia.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the deadline was June 23, 2016.

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

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Want more information about Melbourne Medical School?  Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

Sh!t med students say

Hey, med school OzTREKKers!

Heading to medical school in Australia? Think you’re prepared? Wanna be prepared? Wanna just laugh now because you won’t be able to laugh later?

We’re always up for a laugh. Enjoy!

Australian medical schools still accepting applications for 2017

Monash University Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2017
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: September 23, 2016

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (undergraduate entry)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February 2017
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: September 23, 2016

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Griffith University Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Duration: 4 years
Semester intake: January 2017
Application deadline: September 29, 2016

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

Learn more about medical licensing and accreditation

Great news! OzTREKK will be hosting an online medical licensing webinar in case you were unable to attend the in-person seminars this past spring. This is just one of the many services we offer our students!

Learn more about medical licensing and accreditation

Study medicine in Australia (Photo: Monash University)

Medical Licensing & Accreditation

During this webinar, you will receive the latest information, data, statistics and pathways on becoming a doctor if you complete your studies at an Australian medical school and wish to obtain an internship and residency in Australia, practice in the U.S. or return to Canada.

Each year, we host medical school licensing seminars and online webinars which take you through the entire process of becoming licensed to practice in Australia, in the U.S., or in Canada.

Learn more about

  • the latest information about the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia;
  • the process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor;
  • the latest information and statistics on the Canadian residency match, the US residency match, and the Australian internship and residency match;
  • information about the licensing examinations in Canada and the US, what they are, when you need to sit them, and the application process; and
  • the latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia.

If you are an OzTREKK student who plans to attend one of the following medical schools, this webinar is for you!

  • Griffith University Medical School
  • James Cook University Medical School
  • Monash University Medical School
  • University of Melbourne Medical School
  • University of Queensland Medical School
  • University of Sydney Medical School

Upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinar

Date: Wednesday, August 31
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time) 4 p.m. (BC time)

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To register for an this OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinar, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada 1-866-698-7355.