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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Medical Schools’

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

Projects tackling key health challenges of antimicrobial use and skin cancer are the first to be funded under a flagship initiative by the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine.

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

UQ Centre for Clinical Research

Deputy Executive Dean and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Melissa Brown, said the faculty is committed to progressing worthy world-class research by providing operational support over five years to deliver health outcomes.

“Our Health Outcomes Programs, or HOPs, represent a strategic approach to faculty research, in collaboration with our hospital and health partners,” Professor Brown said.

“These are very specific and targeted programs of research that address an identified health problem and will produce a specific and visible benefit.”

The first project selected will address high rates of infection in critically ill patients by optimising antimicrobial therapy.

The research team will use whole genome sequencing to rapidly determine which bacteria are causing infection so the most suitable drug and dose combination can be given. Once the process is established, the research team will test it in the clinic and determine its benefits to individual patients and the health system.

The project led by Professor Jason Roberts and Professor David Paterson includes researchers from UQ’s Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR) and School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences (SCMB).

The second program to be supported focuses on harnessing technology to address the problem of high melanoma incidence and mortality.

The research team will recruit high risk participants to test targeted screening using 3D total body photography and mobile teledermoscopy in the context of the Australian health care system.

Results will be used to drive evidence-based changes to clinical practice.

The project will be led by Professor Peter Soyer of UQ’s Diamantina Institute and Professor David Whiteman, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, and includes collaborators from QUT, QIMR Berghofer and UQ’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business.

Professor Brown said both teams should be congratulated for working collaboratively to create change and translate research into tangible health outcomes.

“These projects were selected following a competitive application process engaging interstate reviewers in late 2016, and we look forward to seeing them make a difference to health care in the years ahead.”

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about studying medicine at UQ. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

OzTREKK welcomes two more Australian universities!

Because we like to offer our students as many study options as possible, we now have two more Australian universities offering popular programs like medicine, dentistry, and law!

All of us at OzTREKK are pleased to announce that we are now an official Canadian representative of two additional Australian universities: Charles Sturt University, and the University of Western Australia.

Charles Sturt University

Learn more about CSU

Charles Sturt University

First, meet Charles Sturt University! Established in 1989, it was named in honour of Captain Charles Sturt, a British explorer who made expeditions into regional New South Wales and South Australia.

While CSU has many campuses located in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, and the Australian Capital Territory, OzTREKK students will be headed to Orange, New South Wales, for their Bachelor of Dental Science program. Nestled in the Central Tablelands of NSW, 260 km west of Sydney, Orange is a progressive city with a friendly country atmosphere. The city’s 38,000 residents enjoy excellent retail, sporting, educational and health services. With two movie cinemas, restaurants offering a range of cuisine, popular Farmers’ Markets, wineries and an annual FOOD Week, Orange combines boutique shops, sporting facilities, and quality educational and health services.

University of Western Australia

Learn more about UWA

University of Western Australia

How about heading to the west coast of Australia for a change? If so, you’re in for a treat: Perth, Australia is incredibly beautiful, and you get to enjoy stunning sunsets over the Indian Ocean!

The University of Western Australia is a research-intensive university and one of the internationally recognised Australian Group of Eight (which also includes the University of Queensland, the University of Sydney, the University of Melbourne, and Monash University).

OzTREKK students will be happy to know that UWA offers three in-demand degree options for Canadian students:

UWA’s picturesque Crawley campus is located on the Swan River just 10 minutes from Perth. The campus offers you a range of cafes, bookshops, banks, a vibrant cultural precinct, myriad clubs and societies, a supportive Student Guild, and on- and off-campus accommodation options.

We are thrilled to welcome you, Charles Sturt University and University of Western Australia!

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If you have any questions about our new Australian universities, please email info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. We’re here to help!

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Australian medical school rankings 2017

Why do so many Canadians consider studying at an Australian medical school?

Austrlian medical school rankings 2017

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Because Australian and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Medical schools in Australia offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting. Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their high world rankings! The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2017 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2017

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
15th University of Sydney
11th University of Toronto
19th University of Melbourne
22nd McGill University
29th Monash University
27th University of British Columbia
42nd University of Queensland
35th McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian Medical Schools in top 50)
QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2017

Undergraduate- versus Graduate-entry Medical Programs

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Graduate Entry: Some Australian Medical Schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.

The following Australian medical schools offer a medical program at a graduate-entry level, which are similar to those medical programs offered in Canada and the United States:

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For more information about applying to Australian medical schools, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Are you considering applying to Australian Medical Schools? Then you’ll probably want to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is administered multiple times from late January through early September, and offered at hundreds of test sites in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Don’t forget to study! (Photo: Monash University)

The following graduate-entry medical programs require applicants to sit a medical admission test such as the MCAT:

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application.

All deadlines are at 11:59 PM ET on the day of the deadline.

Test date Score release date
March 31 May 2
April 22 May 23
April 28 May 30
May 13 June 13
May 18 June 20
May 19 June 20
June 1 July 6
June 16 July 18
June 17 July 18
June 29 Aug. 1
June 30 Aug. 1
July 21 Aug. 22
July 22 Aug. 22
July 27 Aug. 29
July 28 Aug. 29
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 11 Sept. 12
August 18 Sept. 19
August 19 Sept. 19
August 24 Sept. 26
August 25 Sept. 26

The first three sections organized around 10 foundational concepts in the sciences (biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, general chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology). In the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section, students are asked to analyze, evaluate, and apply information provided by passages from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines.

  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

Register to write the MCAT.

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

Wondering about when you need to write the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke

Melburnians are taking part in a world-first trial led by Monash University that could see a simple one-off vaccination protect against heart attack and stroke.

The trial, which started late last year, aims to determine whether the pneumococcal vaccine can reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke by up to 20 per cent. Observational studies indicate the injection can lead to a 17 per cent protection against cardiovascular disease, but this is the first large scale study to be conducted.

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke

Professor Andrew Tonkin and Dr Ingrid Hopper (Photo: Monash University)

The Australian Study for the Prevention through Immunisation of Cardiovascular Events (AUSPICE) trial is being coordinated by the Centre for Cardiovascular Research and Education in Therapeutics (CCRET) within the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SPHPM). The trial is led by Principal Investigator Professor Andrew Tonkin and assisted by Dr Ingrid Hopper and will be based at Caulfield Hospital.

AUSPICE is recruiting up to 3,000 men and women aged 55 to 60 years across six centres in Melbourne, Newcastle, Gosford, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth.

The study will formally test whether the existing pneumococcal vaccine can not only reduce invasive pneumococcal disease but also help to prevent heart attack and stroke. The pneumococcal vaccine protects against diseases such as meningitis and is currently free under the National Immunise Australia Program for people over 65, children and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and children.

According to Dr Hopper, if the trial proves to be successful it will signify a major change in preventative health practice globally.

“If shown to be effective, it would be relatively easy to incorporate changes into clinical practice because the pneumococcal vaccine is safe and has already been used in Australia for over 20 years in a different target group,” Dr Hopper said.

Victorian volunteers, aged 60–64, are asked to attend a single clinic at the Caulfield Clinical Trials Centre in Melbourne, for less than one hour. People with at least two risk factors for heart disease—high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or overweight/obesity—will be randomised to receive either the active vaccine or a saline placebo.

This collaboration between Monash University, the University of Newcastle, Australian National University, Flinders University and The University of Western Australia comprises a large multidisciplinary team including cardiologists, epidemiologists, neurologists, nurse immunisers, pharmacists, public health and medicine physicians and biostatisticians.

The researchers will link, via the Federal Department of Health hospital admission records, the incidence of cardiovascular disease requiring hospitalisation among those who received the vaccine and those who received the placebo.

Study Public Health at Monash University

The Master of Public Health at Monash is a 12-unit program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the university to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

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Study Medicine at Monash University

The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine at Monash University has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise to ensure that graduates are prepared for their future as a doctor.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the graduate Monash medical program

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Would you like more information about studying at the Monash University School of Public Health, contact Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

For more info about studying at Monash Medical School, please contact Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017

University of Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push

People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push for a long-awaited research breakthrough to develop treatments that for the first time could prevent or mitigate this disabling and potentially life-threatening condition. The University of Melbourne, in partnership with the Royal Melbourne Hospital, is the only Australian institution to take part in the project, funded by one of the largest grants to date awarded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research into the elusive condition.

Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push

People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push (Photo: University of Melbourne)

Some 250,000 Australians suffer from epilepsy, the causes of which range from tumours to infections, genetics, hemorrhages or stroke, in addition to brain trauma.

Principal Investigator neurologist Terry O’Brien said epilepsy caused by traumatic brain injury, the major cause of epilepsy in people aged 15–24, is harder to predict and control than many other forms of epilepsy.

“Up to 20 per cent of people who’ve had a traumatic brain injury will develop epilepsy, yet researchers know very little about why, and have no way to prevent or mitigate it,” Professor O’Brien said.

“It’s the nasty sting in the tail for people who’ve got through a difficult rehabilitation, only to be hit by their first seizure just when they think they’re on the mend—anywhere from six months to two years after they were first injured.

“More than a third of these patients’ seizures can’t be controlled by drugs.”

Professor O’Brien—who is the James Stewart Chair of Medicine and Head of the Department of Medicine (Royal Melbourne Hospital) at The University of Melbourne—said the key to Melbourne’s appeal to be invited to be part of this international research collaboration was its location in the Parkville Precinct.

“Being in the Parkville Precinct will enable clinicians and researchers from disciplines such as neuroscience, electrophysiology, imaging, bioinformatics and molecular biology to work very closely together, at the Melbourne Brain Centre and the Royal Melbourne Trauma Centre and ICU.”

The project, one of three NIH Epilepsy Centres without Walls, will be led by researchers at five institutions—the University of Melbourne, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, and the University of Eastern Finland.

About Melbourne Medical School

The Melbourne Medical School is part of the Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health Sciences. It is the oldest medical school in Australia and internationally renowned for global leadership in teaching and training, health research, policy and practice. The school encompasses all major fields of medicine and rural health.

Renowned for global leadership in health research, policy and practice, the University of Melbourne educates more health professionals than any other university in Australia.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the deadline was June 23, 2016.

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

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Want more information about Melbourne Medical School?  Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Apply to the new Monash University medical program!

The new combined Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine degree has replaced the Monash University Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Honours) MBBS program as of 2017 entry. The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine (MD) is an internationally recognised, higher-level qualification and has been accredited by the Australian Medical Association.

Apply to the Monash University medical program!

Learn more about the Monash University medical program!

This new Monash medical program has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors in order to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise needed for a successful career as a doctor.

Students who commence the Monash MD will undertake a Scholarly Intensive Project in the final year of the course. Medical students will undertake traditional research activities as well having the opportunity to increase learning opportunities around clinical and professional practice.

Monash will continue to offer the 5-year direct-entry medical program (from high school), as well as the 4-year graduate-entry program, with the same number of places available in both courses.

Interview Dates for Canadian applicants
September 4 & 5, 2017 (Toronto)
September 7 & 8, 2017 (Vancouver)

Dates are subject to change.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (undergraduate entry)
Location: Clayton campus, Melbourne
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the undergrad Monash medical program

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the graduate Monash medical program

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Find out more about the new Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, February 6th, 2017

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he’d been told as a med student

Hailing from Canada, Shaun completed his medical degree at UQ before undertaking his fellowship at the University of Toronto and his residency with University of Calgary. He currently works full time as a Queensland Health registrar within intensive care and in his spare time he works for House Call Doctor— a 100% bulk-billed, after-hours, home GP service operating in Queensland. If you’d like to hear firsthand from a Canadian who is now practicing medicine in Australia, check out Shaun’s advice!

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he'd been told as a med student

Canadian Shaun Hosein, now practicing in Australia! (Photo credit: UQ)

1. Study medicine for the right reasons.
Medicine is a highly rewarding career that has many opportunities in various sub-specialty fields. However it is a long road, requires intensive study, and at times can seem impossible. It is not a decision to be made lightly, and there are times I wish I could fix that leaky pipe in my kitchen. I chose medicine, because it not only helps people, but I enjoy thinking on my feet and problem solving. Reflecting a bit more, it has also developed my personal ethics and communication skills.

2. For international medicine students, you can’t beat UQ for education and lifestyle.
UQ is constantly improving their medicine course which I feel is important when choosing a university and medical school. When I was applying they were very approachable and efficient throughout the application process.  The case-based learning style made me nervous, but I think it is the best way to learn and study medicine. Brisbane is also an amazing city, it has the best climate of all Australian cities (none of this “four seasons in one day” stuff). Plus the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast are about an hour away! Perfect study and lifestyle balance.

3. Studying internationally is incredible, but it can be difficult when you return home.
I have spoken to numerous potential Canadian medical school candidates over the years, and my advice is the same. Studying medicine at UQ was a life-changing event for me, and provided me unique opportunities in an amazing country. I won’t lie—you will find it challenging being away from home, and to be honest, getting back into the Canadian system is difficult. UQ does facilitate opportunities to make this process easier, but it is still a challenge. Be prepared to finish internship training in Australia before considering the road back or please at least obtain and maintain general registration with AHPRA.

4. There are pros and cons to working in different health systems, so consider what’s important to you.
I can only speak in relation to the Canadian and Australian healthcare systems, but in my honest experience you get paid more, will have better shifts and rosters, and overall better work-life balance in Australia.  On the other hand, internship training is structured better in Canada: training is slightly shorter and there are no primary exams, but the programs are very difficult to get accepted into.

5. In medicine, you can have a “typical routine” but you’ll never have a “typical day.”
I currently work for Queensland Health and for House Call Doctor when I have extra time in the evenings, usually on nights off, or weekends. Being a home GP after-hours is very flexible and works well with my schedule. Working with House Call Doctor means I get to visit a wide variety of patients who need urgent after-hours care, treating everything from acute cold and flus to more serious conditions, such as gastro, home accidents or chronic illness. You really never know what kind of patients you’ll treat!

6. Sometimes taking the road less travelled will put you on the right path.
I always wanted to work in primary care, but it was quite difficult to get any experience and determine if it suited me. House Call Doctor has given me this experience but it’s also shown me another side to medical practice. I honestly feel after-hours care is becoming its own sub-specialty of medicine. I enjoy it because it allows me to have a simple chat with patients, to see children or speak with a young mum. It is very rewarding, and not something I could have experienced working in the adult system alone.

7. As a student, it’s easy to get run down from all that studying (and perhaps socialising). When you do get sick there are probably more healthcare options available to you than you think.
House Call Doctor offers 100% bulk-billed home GP visits to anyone with a Medicare or DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affair) Card.  Having a GP visit your home can be particularly useful in acute medical situations that don’t warrant an emergency department response, but can’t wait until normal clinic hours. House Call Doctor visits a wide cross-section of patients, including students living in shared accommodation. International students can also take advantage of the after-hours medical care, rebated if they travelling with BUPA, NIB, Allianz or Medibank insurance. For more information you can visit www.housecalldoctor.com.au, or you can phone the after-hours line on 13 55 66 to book an appointment.

8. Support networks and technology are invaluable for international students.
Having a strong family and supportive Australian peer group is extremely important throughout your medical degree. At the same time, don’t underestimate the impact of technology. Skype, FaceTime, and WhatsApp will ensure you can easily stay in touch with loved ones back home.

9. Your medical degree can take you anywhere and you’re likely to end up somewhere completely different to where you thought you would.
I have worked in numerous medical fields, and I have definitely not taken a straight path. Initially I was very keen on critical care (ICU), but when I worked in Haiti post-earthquake and again in Africa I got a better understanding of health and the need for public health medicine and primary care. I have since completed Canadian postgraduate training in public health medicine, and am now working towards translating my qualification here in Australia. I also have a public health interest in illicit substance abuse and drug use patterns and am completing a fellowship in toxicology. I tell everyone, especially medical students, to never discount the idea of being a GP; I’m still considering it, if I get time.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

Don’t miss the 2017 JCU Orientation for international students

JCU On-campus Welcome Information Sessions

If you’re headed to James Cook University for the semester 1, 2017 intake, it is important to arrive at the university in time to attend a Welcome Information Session.

JCU Orientation for international students

JCU dentistry students at Trinity Beach during their OzTREKK Orientation

Arriving early will allow more time to adjust to the culture (and warm weather!) and ensure the transition is a smooth experience. After arriving on campus either in Cairns or Townsville, please visit the Student Centre as soon as possible so that they can provide you with details of the JCU Orientation program.

Cairns – JCU Dental School

Compulsory Welcome Session
When: Friday, Feb. 10 at 9 a.m. Morning tea and lunch will be provided
Where: Building A3.2, JCU Cairns campus
What to bring: Passport, copy of your visa, JCU user name and password (if you have one)

Arrival service
Service dates: Monday, Feb. 6 – Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017
Booking deadline: Two weeks prior to your arrival. Book your arrival service now! Visit the OzTREKK Boarding Pass for all your airport arrival info.

Orientation Week
Make sure to attend your faculty welcome on Monday or Tuesday and participate in any of the other activities on offer: campus tours, workshops, student ID card sessions, timetable assistance, parties and much more. Get the most out of JCU O Week!

When: Monday, Feb. 13  – Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

Townsville – JCU Medical School

Compulsory Welcome Session
When: Friday, Feb. 10 at 9 a.m. Morning tea and lunch will be provided
Where: Building 26 (Sir George Kneipp Auditorium), Townsville campus
What to bring: Passport, copy of your visa, JCU user name and password (if you have one)

Arrival service
Service dates: Monday, Feb. 6 – Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017
Booking deadline: Two weeks prior to your arrival. Book your arrival service now. Visit the OzTREKK Boarding Pass for all your airport arrival info.

Orientation Week
Make sure to attend your faculty welcome on Monday or Tuesday and participate in any of the other activities on offer: campus tours, workshops, student ID card sessions, timetable assistance, parties and much more.
When: Monday, Feb. 13  – Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

OzTREKK Orientations at James Cook University

Don’t miss the OzTREKK Orientations which are designed specifically for our students! We offer our OzTREKK Welcome breakfast or lunch and the OzTREKK Shuttle service.

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Be sure to log on to the OzTREKK Boarding Pass for all of your orientation details! Do you have questions about orientation? Contact your OzTREKK Admissions Officer or call 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Five reasons to study at Sydney Medical School

Why should you join Australia’s top medical school? Sydney Medical School is ranked number one in Australia and 17 globally in the QS World University Rankings, but that’s not the only reason why students from all over the world come to Sydney Uni to study medicine.

Five reasons to study at Sydney Medical School

Meet Sydney Med School reps at the upcoming seminar!

1. Early patient care

You’ll begin your medical studies with hands-on experience in a structured, supervised way over years 1 and 2, which means you’ll be well prepared for when you transfer to clinical schools in Stage 3 (years 3 and 4).

“A great strength of the course is that you get to enter the clinical world right from your first week of your first year,” explained Co-Director of the Sydney Medical Program Professor Inam Haq.

2. Teaching hospitals

Clinical training is offered at an extensive network of top-tier hospitals across New South Wales that offer the most advanced healthcare in the country, including Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Westmead Hospital and the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, to name just a few.

“The clinical training component of your medical degree will take place at one of our many fantastic clinical schools across Sydney. Whichever one you’re placed at you will have a fantastic experience with dedicated teachers and support staff to help you in your studies,” said Professor Haq.

3. Research training

If you study medicine at Sydney, you will have access to world-leading researchers, research institutes and networks. You will gain formal training in research methods in your first year, encompassing the basic principles of health and medical research, research governance and ethics, and the basics of research methods in biomedical, clinical and public health.

“Our lecturers are world leaders in their fields, and the University of Sydney has deeply entrenched roots in research. They’ve been able to show us that research and clinical exposure go hand in hand, and so I have peers who are working intensely on research projects who will be the next face of medicine,” Sean Hassan, a Stage 4 medical (and OzTREKK!) student said.

4. Rural experience

With campuses in Dubbo and Orange, as well as departments in Broken Hill and Lismore, our School of Rural Health provides clinical placements throughout central, northern and western NSW. We also work in partnership with the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia.

“Medicine students at the University of Sydney have the option to go rural for a whole year. Everyone has something amazing to say about it, and lots of students tend to go back. That definitely made me want to come here,” said Lakshmi Sunderasan, a Stage 2 medical student.

5. Overseas opportunities

With extensive international connections, both across Asia-Pacific and in major research centres in North America and Europe, Sydney encourages its medical students to participate in an international elective.

You can take undertake a four- to eight-week clinical or research placement during your elective term. Many Sydney Medical School students also undertake optional overseas placements during the year-end break to places like Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Sweden and Vietnam.

Don’t miss the Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars

Find out why the University of Sydney is one of the top universities in the world! Enjoy refreshments, speak with Sydney Uni representatives and alumni, and learn more about what happens after graduation and the accreditation process so you can practice in Canada!

Don’t forget to RSVP!

Dalhousie University
Date: January 23, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: Council Chambers, SUB

University of Toronto
Date: January 24, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: MB128, Lassonde Mining Building

Western University
Date: January 25, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: McKellar Room, UCC

University of Calgary
Date: January 26, 2017
Time: 12:10 p.m.
Location: Escalus Room, MacEwan Centre

University of Alberta
Date: January 26, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: ECHA 2-150

University of British Columbia
Date: January 27, 2017
Time: 5:15 p.m.
Location: Performance Theatre, AMS

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Discover more about studying medicine or dentistry at Sydney Uni. Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.