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Articles categorized as ‘University of Queensland Veterinary School’

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports international students

Moving to a new country can be daunting. So can starting at a new university, and doing both at once can be a real challenge! The UQ School of Veterinary Science helps international students make a smooth and successful transition to life and studying on Gatton Campus.

UQ vet science supports international students

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports its international students! (Photo: UQ)

International student representatives

In each year of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) program, two international year representatives are elected. They provide a collective voice for international students in a single year and are the first contact for international student issues. The international year representatives also discuss international student issues with the veterinary school international student mentor, organise international students’ events and provide mentoring services to international students.

Email addresses for international year representatives will also be provided to international students of each year.

International student representatives

  • communicate any international students issues directly with the international student mentor;
  • develop and maintain an international student Facebook page;
  • help organise events;
  • are involved in the international student peer-support/mentoring.

Peer support for international students

An international (peer) mentor is a current student who volunteers their time to help new students settle into life in Gatton and study at the UQ School of Veterinary Science.  All new students have to make adjustments to be successful at university.  Mentors provide peer support and thus a student’s perspective of university life by sharing their experiences, challenges and insights.  The international student mentors are a mix of local and international students working together to assist new students from the time they arrive in Australia, attend orientation and throughout the semester.

Academic mentor for international students

Dr Joerg Henning is the International Student Mentor at the School of Veterinary Science. He liaises directly with international students and international student representatives and provides support, guidance and advice on any issues that might be important for international students.

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours

The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

If you have any questions about UQ Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

The UQ School of Veterinary Science is located on the Gatton campus of the University of Queensland. This campus represents Queensland’s premier hub for animal and agricultural training and is 100 km west of Brisbane, Queensland’s capital city and a major national and international transport hub.

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

UQ Vet Centre at the Gatton campus

The veterinary teaching facilities on the Gatton Campus were built in 2010 and are among the best in the southern hemisphere. The University of Queensland Gatton campus provides access to all animal species and clinics and teaching facilities are located at the one site, so there is no need to switch between campuses!

Approximately 24% of students in each year of the program are international students, hailing from a diverse range of home countries, including Canada. Modern veterinary practice must have a global perspective, and the  Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) curriculum has been designed to offer internationally aligned content and methods of teaching, preparing students for professional roles in whichever region they choose.

UQ and the School of Veterinary Science demonstrate their excellence in a number of ways, not least being highly ranked on global tertiary education quality indicators. The latest QS Global Employability Ranking placed UQ within the top 5 universities in Australia, and within the top 60 internationally, with respect to employability of its graduates.

The school has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Since its first intake of students in 1936, the UQ School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

Generous donation supports recovery of UQ veterinary hospital patients

Sailor the Great Dane was the first patient to benefit from a generous donation to the University of Queensland Veterinary Medical Centre for the purchase of a portable patient monitor.

Generous donation supports recovery of UQ veterinary hospital patients

The monitor enabled the close observation of Sailor’s vital signs while moving him to and from receiving CT Scans (Photo credit: UQ)

The monitor enabled the close observation of Sailor’s vital signs while moving him to and from receiving CT Scans.

Sailor was suspected of having lesions in the cervical area of the spine, and this condition would have predisposed him to a drop in heart rate or respiratory arrest. The portable patient monitor enabled the staff to easily check for these complications if they occurred.

Head of UQ School of Veterinary Science Professor Glen Coleman said the donation enhances patient care and was very appreciated by the staff and veterinary students who benefit from hands-on exposure to the monitor during their anaesthesia rotations.

The UQ Veterinary Medical Centre opened in August 2010 and hosts the latest in veterinary medical and surgical diagnostic and treatment options which underlie the School of Veterinary Science’s commitment to providing high-quality, compassionate care to meet the needs of the patient, client and referring veterinarian while providing quality learning experiences for clinical veterinary students.

Bachelor of Veterinary Science at the University of Queensland

The vet program at the UQ Veterinary School is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years

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Would you like more information about UQ Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, November 21st, 2016

A prickly patient for UQ Veterinary School

Sticking his best beak forward was not a wise idea for George the echidna, who recently ended up with a fractured beak near the town of St George, Queensland.

But thanks to a kind rescuer and the staff at the UQ Vets Small Animal Hospital at the UQ Veterinary School, George has made a full recovery and is ready to defend his territory.

A prickly patient for UQ Veterinary School

George the echidna (Photo credit: UQ)

Veterinary nurse Rebecca de Gier said a good Samaritan had found George rolled up in a ball by the roadside and looking poorly.

“Luckily for George, the gentleman had the presence of mind, commitment, passion and kindness to animals to drive five hours to bring him to us for a check up,” Ms de Gier said.

“George was X-rayed and provided with pain relief, and had a fracture in his beak stabilised.”

George received world-class attention from the hospital’s avian and exotics team, including Associate Professor Dr Bob Doneley, veterinary intern Dr Zoe Anastassiadis and Ms de Gier.

“Vehicle accidents are the number one cause of damage to echidna beaks that we see,” Dr Doneley said.

“It’s a problem because echidnas need their beaks to eat.

“They have a fifteen-centemetre-long tongue which is housed in the beak, which is about seven centimetres long. They roll out the sticky tongue to catch their food.”

As with most wildlife patients, staff minimised human contact and kept George in a separate wildlife enclosure, where he was fed his favourite termites to help him in his recovery.

“He is doing well now, which was great news for his rescuer who rang every day to check on his progress,” Ms de Gier said.

“All in all, he’s travelled about 40 hours to look after him.

“This gentleman collected George from UQ at the start of Be Kind to Animals Week, and returned him to the area he was found, which is the best possible outcome.

“George can now look after his lady echidnas and keep the other males at bay.”

UQ Veterinary School receives no government funding for wildlife care, relying on community support through the Wildlife Emergency Care Fund.

“We are always grateful for donations to care for our native animals,” Dr Doneley said.

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours

Are you passionate about animals of all shapes and sizes? Consider studying veterinary science!

The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

If you have any questions about UQ Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

UQ Vet focuses on one health—for all creatures great and small

As the gatekeepers of the interface between humans and animals, veterinarians have many roles.

While the local “pet vet,” who vaccinates and treats beloved “Fido” may be the most recognisable, veterinary practice in Australia and Canada encompasses much more diverse fields, including small and large animal practice, emergency medicine, animal production, public health and disease control, quarantine and biosecurity, research and education, pharmaceuticals and commercialisation, animal welfare and therapeutic treatments, and wildlife conservation.

UQ One Health—for all creatures great and small

We are all connected: Fido’s health can affect yours! (Photo credit: UQ)

Over the last decade, the veterinary profession has progressively shifted its focus to a more holistic and integrated approach, which links animal, human and ecosystem health to promote all components through interdisciplinary cooperation.

Concepts of One Health have gathered momentum from an initial focus on understanding and controlling significant recent emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) such as Ebola, avian influenza, and Hendra viruses.

Many recent EIDs originate in animal populations and pose threats to human and environmental health. Veterinarians are playing vital roles in collaborative teams to combat these diseases.

The scope of One Health activities is now extending to embrace broader issues that span animal, human and environmental health, such as sustainable food systems, climate change, biodiversity, animal welfare and many others. A truly integrated approach requires multidisciplinary expertise, including sociological, agricultural, ecological and non-technical knowledge and skills.

An example of such an approach being used to combat recent challenges is the work UQ School of Veterinary Science epidemiologist Dr Ricardo Soares Magalhaes has been conducting, which informs disease control policy by better understanding the link between geographical distribution of animal and human infections and their associated morbidity.

One of his recent projects has involved studying avian influenza—better known as bird flu—and rabies with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the China Animal Health Epidemiology Centre and the China Centres for Disease Control.

Dr Magalhaes is also currently using Big Data to map and develop rapid responses for the West African Ebola virus, with important applications to other emerging infections such as the South American Zika virus.

Researchers from the UQ Veterinary School are also investigating the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of antimicrobial drug resistance in pathogens and commensal organisms in food producing and companion animals in Australia and overseas (in Vietnam and the Philippines). Beyond their human health impact, antimicrobial-resistant bacteria threaten the health and welfare of animals and people’s food security and livelihoods.

This research has already improved veterinary teaching methods.

Students in developing countries are now taught improved antimicrobial awareness and mitigation, and have increased awareness of usage of antimicrobial agents (such as antibiotics) and resistance in the pig industry and in avian species.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Are you interested in veterinary science? Since its first intake of students in 1936, UQ’s School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research.

The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

The UQ School of Veterinary Science has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Creating change: UQ Vet School sets up students for success

Did you know that the UQ School of Veterinary Science is ranked #3 in Australia according to the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016?

Creating change: UQ Vet School sets up students for success

Study veterinary science at UQ!

This ranking places UQ among the world’s best veterinary schools and near the very top of Australia’s best!

UQ Vet is determined to have their students succeed, and encourage the idea that lifelong learning really is the key to being a successful veterinarian in today’s world.

To keep up in an ever-changing industry environment, veterinary education increasingly focuses on self-sufficiency.

UQ Veterinary School’s Professor Paul Mills has worked across many sectors of the industry in the last three decades, including government, emergency medicine, and education, and knows firsthand that students need more than just scientific or practical skills to succeed.

“Setting up our students for success means teaching them not only the vital skills they need to hit the ground running from day one, but also how to learn for themselves so they can continue to develop as veterinarians, but also more broadly as scientists, for their whole careers,” says Professor Mills.

We are trying to make sure they’ve got that ability to change, to think for themselves, to work for whatever job they can do, so they are not pigeon-holed. – Professor Paul Mills

Part of this process involves regular training throughout the five-year Bachelor of Veterinary Science program in skills that are vital to success after graduation.

“From the beginning of their degree, students must participate in activities that prepare them for day-to-day life as a practitioner,” says Professor Malcolm Jones, a parasitologist who works closely with students in the veterinary science program, and has visited Canada to deliver informative information sessions to future UQ vet students.

“This includes a boot camp called Vets for Life at the beginning of their degree that establishes their expectations and provides them with support mechanisms for their studies.

“Later in their coursework, they conduct mock interviews to prepare them for dealing with difficult clients; take courses that develop their business-management, client-management and people skills; and learn techniques to help them manage their feelings and actions in a high-stress environment.

“We are really keen to support our students’ development as resilient, critical thinkers.”

Student Sarah Babington is completing a Bachelor of Veterinary Science and says UQ has prepared her well for a career after graduation.

“Studying veterinary science at UQ has not only taught me the importance of practical skills, such as client communication and business management, but also the essential role veterinarians play in today’s world of human public health on an international scale.”

To learn more about the Vets for Life program, visit veterinary-science.uq.edu.au/student-life

Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours at UQ

The vet program at the UQ Veterinary School is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the UQ School of Veterinary Science!

*

Discover what it’s like to study at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, July 8th, 2016

National honour for UQ veterinary researcher

A University of Queensland veterinary virologist who is playing a key role in reducing animal diseases in developing countries has received the prestigious Kesteven Medal at the national Australian Veterinary Association 2016 conference in Adelaide.

National honour for UQ veterinary researcher

Professor Jo Meers accepting her award at the recent AVA conference in Adelaide (Photo: UQ)

Associate Professor Joanne Meers of UQ’s School of Veterinary Science was awarded the medal for “distinguished contributions to international veterinary science by providing technical and scientific assistance to developing countries.”

Associate Professor Meers said she was honoured and humbled to receive the award.

Head of School Professor Glen Coleman congratulated Dr Meers and said her research brought further credit to the school, which this year celebrates its 80th anniversary.

“Joanne joined the university as a senior lecturer in veterinary virology in 2000, and was appointed Associate Professor in 2007. She is the school’s Director of Research and previously was our postgraduate coordinator.

“Her research has benefited people across the globe, from demonstrating the economic and biosecurity benefits of a thermostable Newcastle disease vaccine for chickens of smallholder farmers in Myanmar, to capacity building and the increased development of diagnostics of viral diseases of livestock, or to leading a greater understanding of the role domestic ducks play in avian influenza in Vietnam and Indonesia.”

UQ Veterinary School’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours program

The vet program at the UQ Veterinary School is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the UQ School of Veterinary Science!

*

If you have any questions about studying at UQ Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

UQ animal geneticists kicking goals for cattle industry

Australian cattle farming could become safer and cheaper thanks to the work of an animal genetics team at the University of Queensland.

The state-of-the-art Animal Genetics Laboratory (AGL) at the UQ School of Veterinary Science is conducting genetic tests to help the cattle industry reduce the need for dehorning.

UQ animal geneticists kicking goals for cattle industry

Some beef cattle carry two copies of the polled genes, meaning it naturally lacks horns (Photo credit: UQ)

AGL science leader Dr Russell Lyons said the lab, which was celebrating its 500,000th cattle sample, had conducted 40,000 Australian Poll gene marker tests including 12,000 tests in the past 12 months.

“The test is used to determine if an animal is ‘true polled’—that is, it carries two copies of the polled genes, meaning it naturally lacks horns,” Dr Lyons said.

“Poll testing is helping cattle breeders select the best breeding cattle for their herds and may help the industry end the painful practice of dehorning beef cattle through breeding hornless cattle.

“Beef producers dehorn cattle to prevent significant injuries to other animals and handlers in yards, feedlots and during transportation.

“Breeding polled or hornless cattle means we can reduce the need for dehorning.”

Dr Lyons said 90 per cent of the laboratory’s work was for the livestock industry, but the lab covered a diverse range of species, including other farmed animals, the aquaculture industry, fisheries and wildlife ecology groups.

“We’ve genotyped goats, alpacas, koalas, tiger sharks, sugar gliders, dugongs, crocodiles, humpback whales and salmon, and our 500,000th sample was from a wagyu beef animal,” the UQ veterinary science researcher said.

“We’ve stored our samples—predominantly hair—since our foundation 23 years ago, resulting in a uniquely Australian cattle library.

“Our clients are from throughout Australia, New Zealand, South America and even Kazakhstan, where our research is helping build capacity in their beef industry using Australian Angus cattle.

“We’ve also been able to assist the dairy industry in identifying genes for factors such as strong milk production and growth rates.”

Dr Lyon’s said the lab had also undertaken genetic tests to help police in cattle theft cases and had received a Queensland Police Service silver award for such work.

Dr Lyons said research was an important component of AGL’s charter to boost the competitiveness and profitability of Australian livestock industries and agricultural communities.

“With a highly skilled multidisciplinary team and state-of-the-art technology, we believe AGL will continue to provide world-class services tailored to our customers’ needs,” he said.

The Australian Poll gene marker tests build on previous research by UQ, CSIRO and University of New England.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Are you interested in veterinary science? UQ’s program is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

The UQ School of Veterinary Science has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia. Graduates of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science program may sit the North American Veterinary Licensing Examination in order to be qualified to practice veterinary science in North America.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

Do you have questions about UQ Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at 1-866-698-7355 or shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

Distinguished academic leads UQ School of Veterinary Science clinical facilities

A multi-award winning teacher, researcher and scientist has joined the UQ School of Veterinary Science to lead the clinical facilities in the role of Academic Superintendent for UQ VETS Teaching Hospital.

UQ School of Veterinary Science

UQ Vet School Prof Perkins (Photo: UQ)

Professor Perkins completed his veterinary science degree at UQ in 1984, earning first-class honours and a University Medal.

After some years in mixed practice in Victoria, he completed his residency and Master of Science in animal reproduction at Ohio State University and became a Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists in 1990. Theriogenology is the branch of veterinary medicine concerned with reproduction.

Professor Perkins was awarded his Fellowship of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Equine Reproduction in 1998.

While teaching and practicing theriogenology at Massey University, New Zealand, Professor Perkins developed expertise in epidemiology, the study of the patterns, causes and effects of health and diseases. He undertook doctoral studies on the epidemiology of health and performance in New Zealand racehorses, with his PhD being awarded in 2005 at Massey University.

Bachelor of Veterinary Science at the University of Queensland

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ has a general application deadline of November 30 each year; however, candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

Would you like more information about UQ Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

UQ vets help three-legged Ziggy back on his paws

The future seems bright for Ziggy the three-legged wonder dog, after specialist surgery at the University of Queensland’s Veterinary Medical Centre at Gatton.

Thanks to the care and dedication of his owners, UQ veterinary staff and students, Ziggy is a poster dog for success in the face of adversity.

 UQ Veterinary School

UQ PhD students Rebecca Colvin and Glenn Althor with Ziggy (Photo credit: UQ)

Now 2 years old, the border collie with a very sweet disposition was found abandoned in 2014 while still a small puppy. His front right leg was broken and healing incorrectly, requiring amputation.

UQ PhD students Rebecca Colvin and Glenn Althor fell in love with the brave little dog and adopted him when he was 3 months old from the RSPCA at Wacol.

“He was a happy little puppy and didn’t mind at all that he only had three legs,” Rebecca said.

“However, a few months later we started to notice that he wasn’t walking well. He was limping, and seemed to be in pain.”

“Our local vet referred us to the referral surgical service at the UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital in Gatton, where it was explained that Ziggy had an angular limb deformity as a result of damage to the growth plates in his front leg.”

Senior lecturer in small animal surgery at the UQ School of Veterinary Science Dr Jayne McGhie said Ziggy’s owners had done the right thing in seeking veterinary advice.

Dr McGhie said that in all young animals like Ziggy, the bones grow from cartilage zones (growth plates) within the ends of the bone.  The cells within these plates can be damaged by any type of trauma.  In Ziggy’s case, the damage was likely due to the increased weight carried on his one front leg after his amputation.

Having the bones grow abnormally meant that Ziggy developed a bent and twisted front leg and this resulted in an inability to walk or run normally or without pain.

 

“We knew we needed to save Ziggy’s remaining front leg to give him a chance at a normal active life,” Dr McGhie said.

“Ziggy’s case is pretty unique and we knew management would be a challenge and the results disastrous for Ziggy if surgery did not go well.”

Ziggy underwent surgery in 2014 to stop the deformity in his leg from getting worse while he continued to grow.  A part of bone in his leg was removed and his front leg was splinted so the bone was supported to grow straight.

After the splint came off last year, Ziggy’s owners bought a semi-customised splint to protect his carpal joint (the joint at the top of his foot) from damage because of the abnormal way Ziggy walked.

Bachelor of Veterinary Science at the University of Queensland

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ has a general application deadline of November 30 each year; however, candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

Learn more about studying at UQ Veterinary School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.