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Articles categorized as ‘JCU Veterinary School’

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

JCU veterinary researcher questions cobalt usage in horse racing

The use of cobalt in horse racing should be halted until the scientific evidence of its effects is established, a James Cook University veterinary researcher says.

JCU Veterinary School

JCU Prof Dr Robert Kinobe (photo: JCU)

Cobalt is an essential dietary trace element but the ability for it to serve as a potent performance-enhancing substance has been known for decades. It can dramatically increase the production of red blood cells in mammals, making them perform harder, faster and for longer periods of time.

In the past few years, many horse racing authorities have become concerned about the worldwide anecdotal use of cobalt as a doping agent because of its potential to cause severe toxicity of the thyroid gland and heart.

Last year, Racing Victoria established a threshold for cobalt at 200 micrograms per litre in urine and this standard has been adopted nationwide in Australia.

JCU’s Dr Robert Kinobe, senior lecturer of veterinary pharmacology, has published a peer-reviewed paper on cobalt, and the effects of excessive use of the element.

It is a world-first, comprehensive review of all studies into the use of cobalt in horse racing.

Based on his research findings, Dr Kinobe recently provided testimony at the Queensland Racing Tribunal in regard to excessive levels of cobalt found in some race horses.

“I understand the need to limit the use of cobalt in race horses, but whatever limits are set, no one can tell me 200 micrograms for sure is safe. Show me the data,” he said.

Dr Kinobe’s main findings were that it is unknown whether the limits authorities have established for the animals are safe, or actually do prevent the presumed doping effects.

Cobalt has been likened to the performance-enhancing drug erythropoietin (EPO) in humans, to aid endurance; however, the supplementation of animal diets with small quantities of cobalt for clinical conditions that affect the formation of blood components is not illegal.

Cobalt is commercially available in many different over-the-counter supplements, or as oral and injectable formulations.

“Different racing authorities are coming up with different levels, but no one knows for sure what is safe, from a scientific perspective,” he said.

Dr Kinobe’s studies show that with repeated administration, cobalt accumulates in horse tissues over time and raises concerns about whether a high reading is the result of one large dose, or many smaller doses over time.

“I’m arguing that the science around it needs to be established and what people should be doing to avoid reaching toxic levels.

“In the absence of that kind of concrete scientific evidence, I would suggest a more pragmatic approach of totally banning the use of cobalt in race horses until the science is resolved,” Dr Kinobe said.

About JCU Veterinary School

The JCU has offered the Bachelor of Veterinary Science program since 2006. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

The veterinary science program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

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Find out more about JCU Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

JCU Vet School embraces animal welfare

James Cook University’s discipline of veterinary science has helped launch a new tool for vets looking to care for animals in an ethical way.

The One Welfare portal will provide vets and veterinary students with essays and scenarios that confront them with dilemmas and help sharpen their approach to the ethics underlying animal care.

JCU Veterinary School

Students and patient at JCU vet school (Photo credit: Sandra Hughes)

JCU Veterinary School’s Dr Janice Lloyd, Senior Lecturer in Veterinary Behaviour, Welfare and Ethics, said the portal has been developed in conjunction with seven other veterinary schools in Australia and New Zealand and with the help of a $378,000 grant from the Office for Learning and Teaching.

“The project aims to keep veterinarians well informed about animal welfare issues so they can apply sound critical thinking skills to solve the ethical dilemmas they will encounter in practice,” she said.

Dr Lloyd said there was an international movement towards better treatment of animals. “There is growing public concern and the Australian community looks to veterinarians as leading advocates for the welfare of all animals.”

The portal will support the “five freedoms for animals” guidelines, developed by Professor John Webster from the University of Bristol, and the “five domains” concept developed by Professor David Mellor at Massey University in New Zealand (see below).

Vets and veterinary students will be confronted with scenarios ranging from a request to euthanise a healthy dog after its owners move to a smaller property to the question of what to do as heat-stressed animals die on a live-export voyage.

The JCU Veterinary School lecturer said the problems were far from just academic exercises. “Research suggests vets encounter at least two serious ethical dilemmas a week. The portal will give them a framework to work through these and help them make decisions they can be comfortable with.”

The website is now being progressively rolled out.

“Ultimately we hope to be able to offer the learning resources to all undergraduate and graduate veterinarians to reshape veterinary and animal science education to meet the need for competence in the often tricky field of welfare and ethics,” said Dr Lloyd.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for JCU to show itself as a Centre for Excellence in the teaching of Animal Welfare and Ethics in a global sense.”

The five freedoms:

1. Freedom from hunger and thirst: by ready access to fresh water and a diet to maintain full health and vigour.

2. Freedom from discomfort: by providing an appropriate environment including shelter and a comfortable resting area.

3. Freedom from pain, injury or disease: by prevention through rapid diagnosis and treatment.

4. Freedom to express normal behaviour: by providing sufficient space, proper facilities and company of the animal’s own kind.

5. Freedom from fear and distress: by ensuring conditions and treatment which avoid mental suffering.

The five domains:

1. Nutrition: e.g., appropriate consumption of nutritious foods is a pleasurable experience.

2. Environmental: e.g., benign conditions offer adaptive choices and variety.

3. Health: e.g., physically sound (uninjured, disease-free) animals enjoy good health.

4. Behaviour: e.g., environment-focused and inter-animal activities are satisfying and engaging.

5. Mental or Affective State: e.g., animals experience comfort, pleasure, interest and confidence.

About the JCU Bachelor of Veterinary Science

James Cook University’s veterinary science students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

The program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years

Apply to JCU Veterinary School!

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Find out more about JCU Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

The RAAF brushes up on dog health at JCU

Vets at James Cook University have been teaching the Royal Australian Air Force how to better look after its working dogs.

Members of the No 2 Security Forces Squadron from RAAF Base Townsville have been at JCU School of Veterinary and Biomedical Science for the past four weeks, learning more about their canine partners.

JCU Veterinary School

LAC Scott Marshall and “Hammer” (Photo credit: JCU)

Leading Aircraftman Scott Marshall said the vets had shown the handlers how to provide first aid to their dogs in the field. “None of our dogs have been on deployment yet, so the big dangers around Townsville are dehydration and snakebite,” he said. “We’ve learned how to deal with those effectively in the field along with battle injuries.”

The RAAF’s dogs are either German shepherds or Belgian Malinois, used for intruder detection and tracking. “They have great noses and they live to work,” said LAC Marshall. “They’re not too big and not too small—they’re the right dog for the right task.”

He and his two-year-old German shepherd “Hammer” had been working together for just over a year.

JCU Veterinary School lecturer Dr Linda Hayes said she was trying to help dog handlers gain insight into the anatomy and physiology of their canine companions.

“The vet school is providing RAAF dog handlers with a better appreciation of functional canine anatomy to help them understand the animals they work closely with every day, both ‘inside and out’. This knowledge helps them to reassess and modify their current training techniques and enables them to become more proficient when providing first aid treatment for their dogs out in the field,” she said.

About JCU Veterinary School

The JCU has offered the Bachelor of Veterinary Science program since 2006. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

The veterinary science program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

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Do you have questions about JCU Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

JCU appoints new tropical health dean

James Cook University has appointed tropical and public health specialist, Professor Maxine Whittaker as Dean of the College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences.

JCU Public Health School

Professor Maxine Whittaker (Photo credit: JCU)

Professor Ian Wronski, Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Division of Tropical Health and Medicine, said the university was delighted to have secured Professor Whittaker for this key position.

Professor Whittaker is currently Professor of International Health at the University of Queensland and was formerly the Director of the Australian Centre for International and Tropical Health at UQ.

“This appointment represents a return to the tropics for Professor Whittaker, who previously distinguished herself in senior health roles in Papua New Guinea, including Senior Technical Health Adviser to the National Department of Health,” Professor Wronski said.

“She brings a wealth of experience in global and tropical health to her new role, having worked extensively in tropical countries including Papua New Guinea, Zambia and Bangladesh, to improve the accessibility, acceptability and quality of essential health services, especially for marginalised and vulnerable populations.”

Professor Whittaker will oversee teaching and research in public health, tropical medicine, biomedical sciences, veterinary science, and molecular and cell biology.

She joins Professor Lee Stewart and Professor Richard Murray as the Deans of the three Colleges in the Division of Tropical Health and Medicine.

“I am excited about the unique opportunity JCU provides to advance the practice of ecosystem health in its teaching, research and engagement activities,” Prof Whittaker said.

JCU is unique in being the only university in Australia, and one of only a few in the world, with human health and public health and animal health in the same division. It also has a strong environmental science capacity in the university that when all brought together can ensure JCU plays a global leading role in the field.”

“Added to this is the strong commitment to, and engagement of, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and academics at JCU, which will uniquely enhance the understanding of and approach to ecosystem health,” Prof Whittaker said.

“The strong bio-medical sciences capacity in the college provides further depth in understanding many of the global tropical human and animal health challenges that need to be addressed if Australia and the world are to achieve the recently launched Sustainable Development Goals.”

Prof Whitaker also has a personal connection to the region. “Both my husband and I have ancestral roots in Northern Queensland, which we look forward to exploring more deeply and helping our families learn about our links to this part of the country.”

In announcing the appointment, Professor Wronski thanked Professor Peter Leggat, who will continue acting in the role until Professor Whittaker takes up the position in Townsville in late February 2016.

“Throughout the university’s restructure and the formation of our division’s three colleges, Peter has provided exemplary leadership and invaluable guidance. We wish him well as he returns to his role as a leading researcher in public health and tropical medicine, working on important projects here and internationally.”

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Would you like to know more about Australia’s tropical university—James Cook University? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

Join JCU in Toronto on June 2

James Cook University’s Division of Tropical Health and Medicine will be hosting a Welcome Evening in Toronto on Monday, June 8, 2015.

JCU Dentistry

James Cook University Dental School, Cairns

Faculty Pro-Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Wronski  is hosting a social event in Toronto welcoming all students and parents interested in learning more about the faculty and JCU.

Venue: Pinnacle Room, Sheraton Centre Downtown Toronto, 123 Queen St. W.
Date: Monday, June 8, 2015
Time: 6–8 p.m.
Map: http://tinyurl.com/sheratonTO

Please RSVP by Tuesday, June 2 at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JCUwelcomeRSVP

The Welcome Evening is a fantastic opportunity for aspiring doctors, dentists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, speech pathologists, veterinarians and public health professionals to learn more about the unique program offerings at James Cook University.

You will also have an opportunity to personally meet and speak with Professor Wronski and Mrs. Sandra Hurlock from the College of Medicine and Dentistry during the event.

Know before you go! Find out more about these popular JCU schools and programs!

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For more information about this exciting event, please contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out more about studying at James Cook University.

Monday, April 27th, 2015

JCU Veterinary School applications are open for the 2016 intake

JCU Veterinary School has offered the Bachelor of Veterinary Science program since 2006. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

JCU Veterinary School

Learn more about JCU Veterinary School

Applications for JCU Veterinary School in Australia for the 2016 intake are officially open via OzTREKK!

James Cook University’s veterinary science program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: September 30, 2015

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have a secondary school diploma and have fulfilled Grade 12 prerequisites of English, Math and Chemistry (Biological Science is highly recommended) for admission into this program. Generally, a B average is required for admission for those who have completed an undergraduate degree, or a 92% in your top six Grade 12 subjects for applicants who have completed only a high school diploma.

The JCU Veterinary School’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science program is five years in length. Regardless of whether an applicant has completed only high school studies, some post-secondary subjects, or a undergraduate degree, the entry pathway is the same for all applicants.

Apply to JCU Veterinary School!

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Find out more about JCU Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, April 27th, 2015

Apply to Australian Veterinary Schools for the 2016 intake

Do you love animals? Are you interested in becoming a vet? Applications for Australian Veterinary Schools for the 2016 intake are officially open via OzTREKK!

Australian Veterinary Schools in Australia

OzTREKK student Ashley is studying vet medicine in Australia!

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies. Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

For professional degrees which train students to become veterinarians, students can study veterinary medicine/veterinary science in Australia as either

The DVM program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

The following Australian universities offer veterinary medicine/veterinary science programs:

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary School Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

New management for JCU veterinary hospital

James Cook University has announced a new management arrangement for its veterinary hospital, with management services to be provided by Greencross Limited.

Founded in Townsville in 1994, Greencross is now Australia’s largest network of veterinary practices.

JCU Veterinary School

Study veterinary science at JCU

Professor Ian Wronski, Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Division of Tropical Health and Medicine at JCU, said the new arrangements would ensure the teaching hospital’s sustainability and expand the opportunities available to students.

“We will continue to operate under the name JCUVet, but we’ll have the business acumen of Greencross behind us,” he said.

Professor Wronski said the new arrangements promised significant benefits for veterinary science students.

“Our students will have access to a wider range of placement opportunities and clinical cases across the Greencross network, which extends from Cairns to Adelaide,” he said. “They will also benefit from further training in the financial expertise that’s essential to running a vet practice.”

Greencross Limited Chief Operational Officer, Dr Ian Kadish said the arrangement would help JCU produce even more work-ready graduates.

“It’s exciting for JCU students to be able to access clinical cases across the Greencross network, as well as JCU’s vet hospital,” said Dr Kadish.

JCUVet, which provides Townsville’s only veterinary emergency and referral centre, will extend its operating hours and will have access to improved pathology services.

Professor Wronski said JCUVet would remain independent and would continue to seek and take referrals from its referring partners in the North Queensland veterinary community.

“Our relationship with the veterinary profession in our region is important to us,” he said. “Their support is important in providing our students with valuable experience in regional and tropical practices, and has helped us make JCUVet a high-quality teaching hospital.

“We’ll continue to take specialty and emergency referrals from across North Queensland, and we’ll continue to work closely with local vets.”

The arrangement is effective from January 1, 2015.

Greencross has more than 115 clinics across the country and was founded in Townsville in 1994 by former JCU Veterinary School student, Dr Glen Richards.

In 2011, Dr Richards received the JCU Chancellor’s Outstanding Alumnus Award.

About JCU Veterinary School

The JCU Veterinary School has offered the Bachelor of Veterinary Science program since 2006. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

James Cook University’s veterinary science program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: September 30, 2015

Apply to JCU Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Veterinary School and about studying veterinary science at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Australasian veterinary schools lead the future on welfare and ethics teaching

James Cook University’s School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences will share in a significant research grant designed to improve the teaching of animal welfare and ethics for future veterinarians.

JCU Veterinary School

Learn more about JCU Veterinary School

The Federal Government recently approved a $378,000 Office for Learning & Teaching (OLT) research grant to produce nationally shared curriculum resources for veterinary undergraduate learning in animal welfare and ethics.

All of Australia and New Zealand’s eight veterinary schools are involved, and the project is being led by the University of Sydney.

JCU’s team leader on the project, Senior Lecturer in Veterinary Behaviour, Welfare and Ethics, Dr Janice Lloyd, said animal welfare involves the psychological and physical well-being of animals.

“Concern for animal welfare is based on knowing that animals are aware and can feel pain, and that consideration should be given to their well-being,” Dr Lloyd said.

“This project will improve Australia’s international standing on animal welfare issues.

“For example, there is growing public concern about the treatment of animals from puppy farming to the live export industry, and the Australian community looks to veterinarians as leading advocates for the welfare of all animals, so this generous funding could not have come at a better time.”

Dr Lloyd said the project aimed to keep veterinarians in Australia and New Zealand well informed about a wide range of animal welfare issues so they can apply what they learn in veterinary school when they are making decisions about an animal’s well-being as qualified vets.

There will be many subjects taught throughout all year levels, depending on the participating school’s preference.

The research project is being led by the University of Sydney in collaboration with JCU, Charles Sturt University, Massey University, The University of Queensland, The University of Melbourne, The University of Adelaide, and Murdoch University.

Each participating university will play a leading role? in developing themes mandated by the Federal Government’s Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) including Animals used for work, sport, recreation or display; Animals in the wild; Companion animals; Livestock/production animals; Aquatic animals; and Animals used in research and teaching.

“The combined experience and expertise from all veterinary schools will be pooled together using an online teaching portal that will reflect world’s best practice. Each school will use the resource differently but essentially a national curriculum will be created to help standardise the teaching of welfare and ethics.”

Dr Lloyd said she had just attended the project’s first workshop in Sydney along with the other team members from all of the veterinary schools.

“It was really collegial and productive, and the next step is for the theme leaders to come up with some teaching scenarios that can be imbedded and tested in the online portal,” she said.

“Ultimately we hope to offer the learning resources to our undergraduate and graduate veterinarians to reshape veterinary education to help ensure our graduates are competent in the often tricky field of making ethical decisions about animal welfare.

“The World Organisation for Animal Health has recently acknowledged the importance of teaching welfare and ethics in veterinary schools, and the World Society for the Protection of Animals, with the support of the World Veterinary Association, is currently looking at ways to develop international standards for teaching animal welfare in veterinary schools around the world.

“So this funding provides a wonderful opportunity for JCU to show itself as a Centre for Excellence in the teaching of animal welfare and ethics in a global sense.”

James Cook University Veterinary School

The JCU Veterinary School has offered the Bachelor of Veterinary Science program since 2006. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

James Cook University’s veterinary science program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: September 30, 2014

Apply to JCU Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Veterinary School and about studying veterinary science at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Veterinary specialist helps out at JCU Veterinary School

James Cook University’s veterinary emergency centre and hospital, JCUVet, has performed four hip replacements on dogs with the help of a Melbourne veterinary specialist.

JCU Veterinary School

Study vet science at James Cook University

Dr Chris Preston, principle veterinarian and registered specialist in small animal surgery at the Pet Emergency & Specialist Centre, made the trip from Melbourne to Townsville to lead the procedure on Friday, March 21.

Dr Preston is a specialist in orthopedic operations and leads Australia in canine arthroscopy as well as joint replacements for arthritis.

JCU Veterinary staff assisted Dr Preston in the two-hour operation to replace a hip on four large cross-breed dogs that have a debilitating joint disease.

Dr Margaret Reilly, Director of JCUVet, said the procedure not only provided a safe and timely service for their referral patients, it offered a learning opportunity for staff.

“We were so pleased to have Dr Preston provide his service to our patients and for our staff to watch his routine and techniques—he’s a rock star in the veterinary world,” she said.

“It’s much easier and safer for the patients to have the operation in their home town instead of putting them on a plane. Post-operatively it will provide a better outcome and it’s more convenient for our clients.

“Our post-operative service is an important element as we operate twenty-four hours daily to provide a great level of care for the dogs.”

JCUVet is the only veterinary emergency centre and specialist referral hospital north of the Sunshine Coast that functions as an after-hours emergency and critical care service, a specialist referral centre and clinical training facility for final year JCU Veterinary School students.

James Cook University Veterinary School

The JCU Veterinary School has offered the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program since 2006. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

James Cook University’s veterinary science program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: September 30, 2014

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have a secondary school diploma and have fulfilled Grade 12 prerequisites of English, Math and Chemistry (Biological Science is highly recommended) for admission into this program. Generally, a B average is required for admission for those who have completed an undergraduate degree, or a 92% in your top six Grade 12 subjects for applicants who have completed only a high school diploma. Please note that the MCAT is not required for entry.

The JCU Veterinary School’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science program is five years in length. Regardless of whether an applicant has completed only high school studies, some post-secondary subjects, or a undergraduate degree, the entry pathway is the same for all applicants.

Apply to JCU Veterinary School!

*

Do you have questions about JCU Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call  1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).