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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Veterinary Schools’

Friday, August 11th, 2017

University of Melbourne veterinarians launch new pain management study for dogs

Just like their owners, man’s best friend can also suffer from osteoarthritis, a type of arthritis that occurs when cartilage at the ends of bones wears down causing pain, swelling and problems moving the joint.

University of Melbourne veterinarians launch new pain management study for dogs

University of Melbourne veterinarians have launched a new pain-management study for dogs

A new pain management study for dogs, the first of its kind in Australia, has been launched by veterinarians at the University of Melbourne’s U-Vet clinic in Werribee to look at a new way to treat osteoarthritis in canines.

Dr Andrew Woodward and Dr Thierry Beths are leading the study and note that pain management for dogs is very similar to how humans are treated.

“When a dog has osteoarthritis we tend to see symptoms such as limited movement including limping,” says Dr Woodward from the Pain Management and Rehabilitation Clinic at the university’s U-Vet Clinic.

“Pets are part of the family, so it’s understandably very concerning for owners when their dog is in pain. With the condition osteoarthritis, dogs do experience mild discomfort to severe pain and lameness from joint swelling.”

The study will test a new plant oil-based pain relief gel.

The University of Melbourne Veterinary research team is recruiting 64 dogs for the canine pain management trial. Dogs need to

  • Have lameness or difficulty moving associated with osteoarthritis
  • Be older than 6 months of age
  • Have been off any arthritis-related medication for 1 week
  • Participate in the 35-day study, including five visits to the Werribee clinic

Dogs will be x-rayed, a blood test taken and have a Fitbit-like device fitted to monitor level of activity. The device measures a subject’s energy expenditure and number of steps in real time, where a reduction in movement can indicate pain.

The patient’s gait will also be recorded using a pressure-sensing walkaway. The walkway allows analysis of the patient’s gait by measuring the ground force reaction at each step.

Melbourne Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

University of Melbourne Veterinary School offers the four-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. The curriculum has been carefully developed to graduate highly capable veterinary scientists whose abilities to solve problems, to draw on the substantial body of veterinary knowledge, to interpret evidence, and to make decisions and act upon them within a clear ethical and professional framework embody all of the graduate attributes to which the faculty aspires.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Intake: Late February/early March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to submit their applications as soon as possible.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about studying at the University of Melbourne Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Meghan Strank at meghan@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

UQ Veterinary School earns top marks in global ranking system

The University of Queensland has been ranked the best in Australia for veterinary sciences by a major international rankings system.

UQ Vet School earns top marks in global ranking system

Study at UQ Vet School (Photo credit: UQ)

Acting Head of the UQ School of Veterinary Science Associate Professor Jenny Seddon welcomed the latest school accolade in the ShanghaiRanking Global Ranking of Academic Subjects for 2017.

“The school has a sustained record of excellence in research and teaching across the veterinary disciplines since our first student intake 81 years ago,” she said.

“In addition to providing world-class veterinary education, our diverse group of academic and clinical staff contribute to animal science, health and welfare through innovative, practical research, advanced veterinary services and successful industry partnerships.”

Associate Professor Seddon said as well as being the top-ranked Australian university in veterinary sciences, The University of Queensland was also ranked globally in the world’s top 25 for veterinary sciences—at ranking 24—in the prestigious subject rankings.

She said prospective students could be confident in the quality of their programs, with the five-year Bachelor of Veterinary Science degree being globally accredited by three major accrediting bodies in Australia/NZ (AVBC), UK (RCVS) and North America (AVMA).

UQ is also a leader both nationally and internationally in the emerging profession of veterinary technology, offering a three-year Bachelor of Veterinary Technology degree which combines theory, practical instruction and hands-on experience.

With more than $140 million invested in purpose-built teaching and research facilities at UQ’s Gatton campus, students and research staff access an integrated site for animal production, health and welfare teaching and research activities set on 1,000 hectares of rural land.

UQ Veterinary School

Since its first intake of students in 1936, the UQ Veterinary School has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours) provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 29; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

Stages of the Melbourne DVM

The primary aim of the Melbourne DVM curriculum is to graduate highly capable veterinary scientists whose abilities to solve problems, to draw on the substantial body of veterinary knowledge, to interpret evidence, and to make decisions and act upon them within a clear ethical and professional framework embody all of the graduate attributes to which the faculty aspires.

The University of Melbourne Doctor of Veterinary Medicine student experience

Study the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Melbourne

If you’ve applied to the University of Melbourne Veterinary School, or if you’ve received an offer, here’s what you can expect:

Years 1 & 2: Build solid foundations

Introduction to the scientific basis of animal health and disease with integrated studies in the following:

  • Veterinary bioscience and an integrated, systems-based study of anatomy, physiology, pathology and pharmacology of each organ system
  • Applications in animal health provides (determinants of disease in populations and in production animal systems)
  • Infections, populations and public health
  • Practical problem-solving and teamwork, including four hours per week of case-based group work

Year 3: Get career-focused, via Melbourne’s Tracks program

Commence your practical clinical training with an introduction to the principles of clinical practice and to species-based medicine and surgery. In addition to your general training, you can select a track in your chosen area of interest. You will have the opportunity to be involved in the extra practical classes and activities with classmates who share your interests.

Four tracks

  1. Production Animal Track
  2. Small Animal track
  3. Government, Industry and Conservation Health Track
  4. Equine Track

Year 4: A year of practice-based learning

Fourth year is also part of the Track program. It is a practical year, conducted under supervision in the University Veterinary Hospital and via external placements. This year includes a final, intensive one-week professional practice program, which consolidates knowledge in preparation for transition into the workforce.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to submit their applications as soon as possible.

Entry Requirements

Eligible Melbourne DVM applicants must

  • have completed an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree); and
  • have completed prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.
  • submit a personal statement (i.e., description of their interest in veterinary science and related experiences with animals).

Acceptable undergraduate science degrees at Canadian universities include science degrees with majors in agriculture, animal science, biochemistry, biomedicine, physiology or zoology.

Selection into the Melbourne DVM will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average and above should apply.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about the Melbourne DVM? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

JCU veterinary alumni in running to be new Bondi Vet

Three JCU veterinary alumni are in the running to become TV’s newest vet star.

JCU Vet

Bondi Vet is a popular Australian television show (Photo via: JCU)

Three Bachelor of Veterinary Science graduates from James Cook University, Campbell Costello, Sheridan Lathe and Stuart Cunningham, are among the top 50 hopefuls vying to become the next Bondi Vet.

Bondi Vet is an Australian factual television series following the lives of veterinary surgeon Chris Brown at the Bondi Junction Veterinary Hospital (near Bondi Beach), and emergency veterinarian Lisa Chimes at the Small Animal Specialist Hospital (SASH) in the Sydney suburb of North Ryde.

The creators of Bondi Vet, WFTN Entertainment, announced an Australia-wide search for the next star of the popular television show, asking members of the public to nominate and vote for their favourite vet.

The top 50 long list includes veterinarians from around Australia, including the three JCU alumni:

Dr Campbell Costello (class of 2010) is a veterinary agent for hire and has been involved in veterinary contracts around Australia and the world including the Iditarod in Alaska, the Mongol Derby in Mongolia and the World Nomad Games in Kyrgyzstan.

Dr Sheridan Lathe (class of 2011) travels around the world with her husband on their yacht, providing assistance to zoos, clinics and animal rescue groups to educate staff, treat animals and raise awareness about animal health in local communities.

Dr Stuart Cunningham (class of 2013) works at Vetlove in Brisbane where he says no two days are the same. The highlight of his job is getting to know his patients and watching them grow with their families.

About JCU Veterinary School

The JCU veterinary program has been offered since 2006. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to diagnose, treat and prevent disease in a wide range of animals including companion animals, farm animals, aquatic species and native fauna. In addition, students will acquire a thorough knowledge of animal production systems, particularly tropical animal husbandry and aquaculture.

This veterinary science program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large-animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: September 29, 2017

Apply to JCU Veterinary School!

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For more information about JCU Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

What is the University of Melbourne Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Tracks program?

The University of Melbourne’s four-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree offers veterinary students the best possible preparation for twenty-first-century careers in a rapidly changing and increasingly global workforce. Students can expect to learn the latest theory and practice, with plenty of practical hands-on experience, taught by a team of leading veterinarians.

New Melbourne DVM students will take part in the university’s unique Tracks program. Tracks help prepare students for their chosen career path by concentrating their studies on a particular area of clinical interest and gaining complementary industry-ready skills and knowledge. This represents the latest international education models and enables you to stand out from the crowd upon graduation!

What is the University of Melbourne Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Tracks program?

Study the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Melbourne

Melbourne’s Tracks program

Commence your practical clinical training with an introduction to the principles of clinical practice and to species-based medicine and surgery. In addition to your general training, you can select a track in your chosen area of interest. You will have the opportunity to be involved in the extra practical classes and activities with classmates who share your interests.

Production Animal Track

This track will provide enhanced opportunities for students to gain hands-on experience and exposure to production animal medicine including working with cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry. Upon graduation, students who choose this track may enter mixed veterinary practice, pursue further study such as a residency, work for the government or quarantine inspection services, work as a production animal health management consultant, or work for private production animal industries such as pigs and poultry producers.

Small Animal Track

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students who are interested in pursuing a career path working with cats, dogs and small pets can elect to join the small animal track. This track will provide enhanced opportunities for students to follow their interest in small animal medicine, small animal surgery, or disciplines such as dermatology and ophthalmology. Upon graduation, students who chose this track may choose to enter private small-animal practice, pursue further study such as an internship or residency, or work for government or private companies supporting the small animal industries.

Government, Industry and Conservation Health Track

Students who are interested in pursuing a career path outside of traditional veterinary clinical practice can elect to join the Government, Industry and Conservation Health track. This track will provide students with enhanced opportunities to pursue their individual area of interest, for example through wildlife health placements, and practical research projects. Upon graduation, students who choose this track may elect to pursue careers as veterinarians employed in government, policy development, one health, epidemiology, welfare, research, and business.

Equine Track

This track will provide enhanced opportunities for students to gain practical skills and experience working with horses before graduation. Upon graduation, students who choose this track may enter private companion equine practices, racehorse practice, pursue an equine internship or residency, or work for government or private equine industries.

About the Melbourne DVM Admissions

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to submit their applications as soon as possible.

Entry Requirements

Eligible Melbourne DVM applicants must

  • have completed an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree); and
  • have completed prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.
  • submit a personal statement (i.e., description of their interest in veterinary science and related experiences with animals).

Acceptable undergraduate science degrees at Canadian universities include science degrees with majors in agriculture, animal science, biochemistry, biomedicine, physiology or zoology.

Selection into the program will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average and above should apply.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

New gift helps treat pets at UQ School of Veterinary Science

A donation of state-of-the-art equipment to UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital has empowered the university’s staff and students, while also improving the outcomes of the animals they treat.

A dog named Sparkie was the first patient to benefit from a generous donation by alumna Hilary Huey (Diploma in Physical Education ’70) that funded the purchase of diagnostic equipment.

New gift helps treat pets at UQ Veterinary School

UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital has received a generous donation (Photo credit: UQ)

Dr Donna Spowart from UQ VETS said the equipment used to treat Sparkie had also provided many additional benefits for students, and pets treated at UQ.

“The digital otoscope allowed us to get good visualisation of what was going on in the ear canal so that we could develop an appropriate treatment plan. Using the equipment meant we could share these pictures with the owner to explain the pet’s condition,” said Dr Spowart.

“It also allowed our students to practice visualising ear structures which is something that is otherwise difficult to teach.”

UQ veterinary science students can watch the clinician position the scope, while also viewing the procedure on the big screen. This content can then be uploaded to online teaching platforms, which allows students to study the material.

From a teaching and learning perspective, this equipment achieves many things with the ability to teach multiple students at the same time without them needing to be physically present.

Ms Huey said she was pleased the equipment had an immediate impact on the learning outcomes of students and the treatment outcomes of the animals cared for by UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital.

“This donation has achieved several benefits; UQ has the advantage of having the latest equipment available and it allows for a more productive teaching and learning experience by both staff and students,” she said.

“Having been trained to use such an item, veterinary students might also be inclined to buy it when setting up their own practice.”

The equipment purchased through Ms Huey’s generosity has made it possible to not only diagnose the condition of Sparkie, but will have wider implications for other animals treated at UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital.

“Most importantly, equipment of the highest standard should allow for more effective treatment and management of the animal’s condition, thus facilitating the maximum chance of the creature’s recovery. To me, this is a win-win situation,” said Ms Huey.

The Webb-Jenkins Veterinary Science Endowment Fund, established with a gift from Hilary Huey, provides funds for the Webb-Jenkins Veterinary Travel Scholarships which supports students who undertake practical placements in rural areas, and also small items of equipment.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Are you interested in veterinary science? Since its first intake of students in 1936, UQ’s School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

The UQ School of Veterinary Science has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at the UQ School of Veterinary Science ! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information.

Monday, April 24th, 2017

University of Sydney veterinary students enjoy exchange in Indonesia

Story by Sydney Veterinary School student

In February 2017, three students, Lidya, Jonathon and myself spent one month at the University Gadjah Mada in Yogyakarta Indonesia as a part of our final year veterinary intern rotations. This counted towards the public health component of our final year. It was interesting to be able to see the different diseases and different approaches employed in Indonesia. It was also great to be able to travel and see the sights during our down time.

We were greeted at the airport by our student buddies Stella, Nendis and Adretta who took us to our accommodation on campus, and continued to show us around and take care of us throughout the month.

University of Sydney veterinary students enjoy exchange in Indonesia

Sydney vet students’ exchange in Indonesia (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Our first week was spent in the reproductive unit on campus, where we were involved in activities such as ultrasound of small animals, rectal palpation of small holder cattle farmer animals, and a visit to the AI cattle semen collection and processing laboratory.

Our second week involved internal medicine, where we learned about public health concerns in Indonesia such as rabies and anthrax. We also accompanied students in treating small animals in the clinic, had classes on reptile handling and visited the local zoo for a behind the scenes tour of the facility, quarantine and clinic area as well as exhibits.

After this we spent a few days at the government lab responsible for investigating disease outbreaks. We visited farms where sudden deaths had occurred such as a quail farm with suspected avian influenza, a goat farm where the goats had died from herbicide poisoning in the grass, and a calf rearing farm where the calves suffered from poor growth and sporadic deaths, likely due to poor nutrition and parasite burden. We also toured the lab and saw the facilities where virology, microbiology and chemical testing occurs.

After this we visited Lombok island where we saw the wet market and poultry farms and slaughter. This was very different to meat slaughter and distribution in Australia. We also volunteered with Lombok animal rescue where we assisted in castration of stray dogs.

In our final week we were involved in the parasitology and pathology laboratories, working with students in performing post mortems, blood smears, blood tests, and microscopic parasite identification. We also assisted in testing mosquito resistance to different pesticides.

Alongside the official activities, in our time off we visited some great tourist attractions including Borobudur temple, Taman Sari Water Castle, Pindul cave, the volcano Mt Merapi, scuba diving in the Gili islands and Marioboro shopping street. Before my placement commence I also spent a week in Bali and a week in Kalimantan at Tanjung Puting national park, observing orangutans in the wild at Camp Leakey.

Indonesia has so much variety to offer, and this has proved to be one of the most varied placements I have had, and has allowed many interesting learning opportunities, not only about veterinary medicine, but about Indonesia and international public health.

This exchange program was led by Prof Agung Budiyanto at University Gadjah Mada and A/Prof Jenny-Ann Toribio at the University of Sydney. Accommodation was kindly provided at the Faculty Guest House by UGM Dean Joko Prastowo.

Veterinary Medicine at the University of Sydney

The Sydney DVM program encourages enrolment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure students learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health.

Year 4 is a capstone experience combining intramural (in University Veterinary Teaching Hospitals) and extramural (in industry and private veterinary practices) placements. These extramural placements may be taken at any approved Australian or international industry or private veterinary practice. These placements enable students to gain workplace experience in a broad range of small animal, large animal and industry situations in preparation for introduction to the workforce following graduation.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the deadline was September 14, 2016.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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Discover more about Sydney Veterinary School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports international students

Moving to a new country can be daunting. So can starting at a new university, and doing both at once can be a real challenge! The UQ School of Veterinary Science helps international students make a smooth and successful transition to life and studying on Gatton Campus.

UQ vet science supports international students

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports its international students! (Photo: UQ)

International student representatives

In each year of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) program, two international year representatives are elected. They provide a collective voice for international students in a single year and are the first contact for international student issues. The international year representatives also discuss international student issues with the veterinary school international student mentor, organise international students’ events and provide mentoring services to international students.

Email addresses for international year representatives will also be provided to international students of each year.

International student representatives

  • communicate any international students issues directly with the international student mentor;
  • develop and maintain an international student Facebook page;
  • help organise events;
  • are involved in the international student peer-support/mentoring.

Peer support for international students

An international (peer) mentor is a current student who volunteers their time to help new students settle into life in Gatton and study at the UQ School of Veterinary Science.  All new students have to make adjustments to be successful at university.  Mentors provide peer support and thus a student’s perspective of university life by sharing their experiences, challenges and insights.  The international student mentors are a mix of local and international students working together to assist new students from the time they arrive in Australia, attend orientation and throughout the semester.

Academic mentor for international students

Dr Joerg Henning is the International Student Mentor at the School of Veterinary Science. He liaises directly with international students and international student representatives and provides support, guidance and advice on any issues that might be important for international students.

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours

The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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If you have any questions about UQ Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

The UQ School of Veterinary Science is located on the Gatton campus of the University of Queensland. This campus represents Queensland’s premier hub for animal and agricultural training and is 100 km west of Brisbane, Queensland’s capital city and a major national and international transport hub.

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

UQ Vet Centre at the Gatton campus

The veterinary teaching facilities on the Gatton Campus were built in 2010 and are among the best in the southern hemisphere. The University of Queensland Gatton campus provides access to all animal species and clinics and teaching facilities are located at the one site, so there is no need to switch between campuses!

Approximately 24% of students in each year of the program are international students, hailing from a diverse range of home countries, including Canada. Modern veterinary practice must have a global perspective, and the  Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) curriculum has been designed to offer internationally aligned content and methods of teaching, preparing students for professional roles in whichever region they choose.

UQ and the School of Veterinary Science demonstrate their excellence in a number of ways, not least being highly ranked on global tertiary education quality indicators. The latest QS Global Employability Ranking placed UQ within the top 5 universities in Australia, and within the top 60 internationally, with respect to employability of its graduates.

The school has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Since its first intake of students in 1936, the UQ School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Sydney School of Veterinary Science warns cats at risk from deadly virus outbreak

Pet owners and vets are being warned against complacency after the resurgence of a deadly feline panleukopenia virus (FPV)—almost eradicated 40 years ago by vaccinations—was confirmed by Australian tests recently.

The once vanquished viral disease feline panleukopenia has caused the death of scores of cats in Sydney in recent weeks, investigations into the outbreak by researchers from the University of Sydney show. The symptoms are fever, lethargy and loss of appetite, followed by vomiting and diarrhea. In severe infections cats can die suddenly with no signs.

Sydney School of Veterinary Science warns cats at risk from deadly virus outbreak

Owners are encouraged to get their pets vaccinated

Sydney veterinarian Dr Tanya Stephens, owner of Haberfield Veterinary clinic, said she had not diagnosed a case for 40 years. That was until her practice diagnosed the disease in four rescued stray kittens. The kittens died after a short illness.

The disease has also struck three animal shelters in western Sydney, resulting in the deaths of more than 50 cats. Affected cats were mostly kittens that had not yet been vaccinated, or were not fully vaccinated.

DNA sequencing by University of Sydney Professor Vanessa Barrs has confirmed that the strain of virus causing the outbreak in Australia is feline panleukopenia virus (FBV). It coincides with several large outbreaks of parvovirus in dogs in NSW, around the Shoalhaven area as well as the Riverina region and Tamworth.

“The message for pet owners is make sure your dogs and cats are vaccinated against these deadly infections,” said Professor Barrs, from the Sydney School of Veterinary Science and Marie Bashir Institute. “Disease in cats is caused by parvoviruses, small DNA viruses. The main one is feline panleukopenia virus but parvoviruses that infect dogs can also cause the disease in cats.”

However, there is no risk for humans as the disease cannot be passed on to them.

Feline panleukopenia virus, also known as feline enteritis, is a deadly viral infection of cats that was first discovered more than 100 years ago. With the uptake of vaccinations, disease virtually disappeared from Australia in the mid-1970s.

The current outbreak is particularly dangerous because it occurs in the middle of summer, when there are larger numbers of kittens around, which are most susceptible to the disease.

The research by Professor Barrs and her colleagues indicates that current vaccines should be effective.

“The current outbreak seems to be caused by a lack of mass vaccination, especially in shelter-housed cats,” Professor Barrs said.

“The disease had previously re-emerged in Melbourne cat shelters a few years ago but despite warnings, cats have not been vaccinated in many shelters because their risk of disease was perceived to be lower than in dogs, when in reality the risk to cats is high.

“When less than 70 per cent of the population is vaccinated, there is a perfect storm for the emergence of a disease epidemic. The current outbreak is a timely reminder that maintaining immunity in populations of animals where effective vaccines are available is essential.”

Sydney School of Veterinary Science

The Sydney School of Veterinary Science is the nation’s premier place to receive training in veterinary medicine. Ranked first in Australia and 9th in the world for veterinary science in the 2016 QS World University Rankings, Sydney has also been given a maximum score of 5 in the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) federal government scheme for the veterinary sciences field of research.

In the Sydney DVM, teaching is research-driven to ensure students will learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health. Students will benefit from a fully integrated learning curriculum with clinical exposure, clinical skills training and animal handling commencing in the first semester and throughout the course.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. for the 2017 intake, the application deadline was September 14, 2016.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

Discover more about your study options at Sydney Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information.