+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Articles categorized as ‘University of Sydney Speech Pathology School’

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Interested in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology? The University of Sydney would like to meet you!

Are you interested in a career in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology or another health science field?

University of Sydney Health Sciences Seminars

Don’t forget to RSVP for the University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions!

Then you are invited to discover why the University of Sydney is a world leader in health sciences education and research!

Attend an upcoming University of Sydney Health Sciences information session between March 28 and 30 to find out what world-renowned health sciences teaching looks like!

Please RSVP here to save your spot!

University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions

Venue: University of Toronto, Bahen Centre, Room 2175
Date: Tuesday, March 28
Time: 6 p.m.

Venue: Simon Fraser University, Halpern Centre, Room 114
Date: Wednesday, March 28
Time: 5 p.m.

Venue: University of British Columbia, Woodward Building, Room 3
Date: Thursday, March 30
Time: 5 p.m.

Study Health Sciences at the University of Sydney

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the application deadline was September 30, 2016.

Apply to Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

*

University of Sydney Master of Physiotherapy

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March
Application deadline: Applications are usually assessed on a rolling basis (as they are received). The sooner you apply the better.

Apply to the University of Sydney Physiotherapy School!

Be sure to RSVP for a Sydney Health Sciences Information Session!

*

Would you like more information about the upcoming Sydney Health Sciences seminars? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Sydney speech pathology researchers receive $6.3 million for internet-based stuttering clinic

In their third consecutive NHMRC Program Grant University of Sydney Speech Pathology School’s Professor Mark Onslow, Associate Professor Ann Packman, and Associate Professor Ross Menzies have been awarded $6.3 million to establish the world’s first internet-based clinic for stuttering.

Sydney speech pathology researchers receive $6.3 million for internet-based stuttering clinic

Professor Mark Onslow (Photo: University of Sydney)

The stuttering e-Clinic will service all the needs of child, adolescent and adult patients affected by stuttering located throughout Australia and eventually the world. The internet-based clinic model will provide economical, scalable and translatable stuttering treatments that will, for the first time, provide a means to adequately manage the public health problem of stuttering.

“The great advantage of this e-Clinic is that it can be accessed by anyone without having to visit a specialist speech pathologist or psychologist,” said Professor Onslow.

“In many cases, standalone internet treatment is effective for children and adults who stutter, and for them, having access to that internet e-Clinic, plus short weekly phone or email contact with a speech pathologist or psychologist, will be enough to treat their stuttering.”

The e-Clinic will mean that only patients who do not respond to this new type of online treatment will need to visit a clinic in person to see a speech pathologist or psychologist.

“The establishment of the e-Clinic will improve the lives of children with speech difficulties all over Australia and is an extremely cost effective way to deal with stuttering.

“We are particularly proud to put have put speech pathology up there in the running with oncology and immunology for this pool of funding” Professor Onslow said.

The funding is part of $125 million in research grants presented by the new Federal Government Health Minister Greg Hunt. The aim of these grants is to provide support for teams of high calibre researchers to pursue broad based, multi-disciplinary and collaborative research addressing complex problems.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

In common with other departments at the University of Sydney, the discipline of speech pathology promotes students’ development of generic  communication and teamwork skills, as well as discipline-specific knowledge and skills. The course is designed to promote self-direction and encourages the graduates to have a sense of their own individuality and creativity. The university offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Speech Language Pathology program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field, who wish to gain the requirements to become a speech pathologist.

Program: Master of Speech Language Pathology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years
Application Deadline: TBA. Applications for the 2017 intake closed October 14, 2016.

Apply to the University of Sydney Speech Pathology School!

*

Are you wondering about speech pathology programs in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh!

Tuesday, January 5th, 2016

Are you considering a career in speech pathology?

What is a speech pathologist?

Speech pathologists coordinate the management of clients, work as part of a multidisciplinary team, consult with other agencies, provide workshops and support family members and other caregivers. A speech pathologist is an important member of an early intervention team, an aged care services team and a school therapy team.

Australian speech pathology schools in Australia

Learn more about studying speech pathology

The role of speech pathologists is to advocate strongly for appropriate care and services for people with communication disabilities.

Speech pathologists work with children and adults with communication difficulties caused by congenital or developmental problems, illness, and emotional or physical trauma. These difficulties include multiple problems with speaking, understanding what people say, reading, writing, voice problems and stuttering. Speech pathologists also work with children and adults who have swallowing difficulties or need alternative, non-verbal ways to communicate. They work in hospitals, schools, health centres, special schools, universities and sometimes with professionals in the workplace.

Where do speech pathologists work?

Speech pathologists usually work in hospitals, community health centres, nursing homes, schools, rehabilitation services, special schools and classes (such as for children with hearing impairment or developmental delay), in rehabilitation centres and in private practice.

Where can I see a speech pathologist at work?

Some private speech pathologists will accept brief visits by prior arrangement from people interested in finding out more about what speech pathologists do. They will show you the clinic and talk to you about their job. Telephone a clinic near you to see if this is possible.

Most large hospitals employ speech pathologists and so do many community and area health centres. They may let you observe for an hour or two.

Australian universities offer undergraduate and graduate-entry professional certification programs in speech pathology, as well as a wide range of postgraduate options in specialized areas. Speech pathology programs in Australia aim to equip students with the theoretical knowledge, skills and professional attributes necessary for a career in speech pathology. Graduate qualifications in speech pathology from Australian Speech Pathology Schools are recognized internationally, and graduates are eligible to apply for certification in Canada.

The following OzTREKK Australian universities offer graduate-entry speech pathology programs, which allow graduates to apply to become certified as speech pathologists:

It is recommended that Canadian students understand the certification requirements and procedures of their Canadian provincial licensing body prior to applying or accepting an offer of admission to a speech pathology degree.

*

For more information about speech pathology program entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, and more, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, November 10th, 2015

Sydney speech pathologist keeps an eye on vocal fry

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School lecturer Dr Cate Madill explores the speech phenomenon becoming increasingly common with young women in Australia, the UK and US.

Much has been written about vocal fry in recent years, with the focus on what it is, where it comes from and what it means. For those who don’t know, the term refers to the lowest vocal register, where the vocal cords are tightly closed for a very long time in the vibration pattern, resulting in a low pitched, creaky voice.

Some of the most recent commentary has focused on how women who use vocal fry are perceived, with detractors and champions, researchers and social commentators weighing in on what is a growing phenomenon.

So why is vocal fry, a commonly occurring phenomenon across all speakers, becoming the focus of commentary and criticism of young women in Australia, the UK and the US?

There are numerous blogs on vocal fry—with commentary, opinion and current media and YouTube examples.

What is vocal fry?

Vocal, or glottal, fry is a description of voice quality (not pitch or loudness). It is also called glottalisation, and is considered a normally occurring feature in many tonal languages, such as Vietnamese, Wu Chinese and Burmese.

It occurs in everyone (men and women) at some time, usually momentarily, and most commonly when we wake up in the morning, before we are fully conscious; when we are tired or de-energised; at the end of phrases, specifically on the last word or syllable; and when we are stressed or anxious.

Vocal fry is perceived as “creaky” or “croaky” and low-pitched as it is the result of very slow and somewhat uneven vibration of the true vocal cords. It is caused by a more flaccid, thicker vocal cord movement and the recruitment of the false vocal cords (the muscles that sit above the vocal cords that we use to hold our breath and cough).

This type of vocal cord vibration results in increased collision force of the true vocal folds (remember the true vocal folds are the only muscles in the body that hit each other).

This increase in force during vibration of the vocal folds can be traumatic and cause injury to the vocal folds if it occurs a lot—injuries such as laryngitis, vocal fold swelling, and vocal nodules, to name just a few.

Vocal fry is a commonly occurring symptom of a voice disorder (when it is present in a person’s voice a lot of the time).

So, fry occurs normally in many languages, cultures and contexts. It is a descriptor of the lowest part of the vocal range, a symptom of a voice disorder, and currently, a cultural phenomenon related to gender, age and geography.

But what does it mean and what attributions do people make when they hear it?

The meaning or attribution given to voice quality has been investigated in many studies—the most rigorous research was conducted by Jeffry Pittam and Cindy Gallois in Queensland in the 1980s. They found that people attribute meaning to the sound of the voice, specifically: solidarity (is this person like me or like-able; are they one of my tribe?) or status (are they more or less powerful than me).

In my (unpublished) PhD, undertaken at the University of Sydney, women with croaky voices were perceived as being more neurotic than men with croaky voices. Women who had clear voices were perceived as being less neurotic than men with clear voices.

That suggests croakiness in women’s voices has a stronger effect in attribution of neuroticism by others than men, and that voice quality is judged more in women than men.

This parallels the findings in other research that women are judged on their physical attributes more than men.

The relationship between power, gender and the voice

Traditionally, older people are attributed more power than younger people and men are attributed more power than women.

A lower pitch is perceived almost universally as the speaker (male or female) having more authority and/ or greater status. We know that the average pitch of women in Australia has dropped since the 1950s.

This fact coincides with a greater participation in the workforce and overall empowerment of women in modern societies in the same timeframe. It also coincides with the empowerment of the younger generation relative to the older generation.

It has been reported that vocal fry as a vocal phenomenon is occurring more frequently in young women (in their twenties and thirties) in the US, the UK and Australia.

Anecdotally, it is also being observed by speech pathologists more commonly in young women in Brazil, but is not reported as a phenomenon in Europe.

There are three likely hypothesis for the increase in vocal fry in young women in modern, western society:

1) A lower pitch is a sign of empowerment, and we know young women are generically feeling more empowered in these societies; therefore, they may be unconsciously signalling this empowerment by lowering the pitch.

The only problem is that when women are in their twenties and thirties, their pitch is still relatively high due to the anatomy and physiology of the voice (pitch naturally lowers in women over time due to changes in cartilage, muscle tone and hormones).

Vocal fry has the effect of perceptually lowering pitch, even though it is not clear sounding. Thus, young women may be unconsciously signalling their own sense of personal power using this voice quality.

Unfortunately though, we know that both male and female listeners will perceive women more negatively if they use a hoarse, rough, creaky tone. Also, continued use of vocal fry is more likely to lead to a voice problem in women that can limit communicative effectiveness and reduced vocal capability.

2) The second possible hypothesis relates to the solidarity attribution we have observed in previous voice research. A person’s accent and/ or native language identifies them as being part of a common tribe.

We all know of the phenomenon whereby we unconsciously mimic a communication partner’s physical movements, accent or verbal style as a means of improving the effectiveness and sense of ease of communication.

Voice quality can also be an identifier of tribal belonging. Vocal fry is a distinct, easily identified vocal feature (unlike many other less obvious features of resonance or vocal clarity) and may be used as an identifier of a gender generation—young women living in a democracy who may have a similar value system and sense of belonging in that tribe.

3) A less likely hypothesis is that the cause of vocal fry is the opposite to empowerment—it is a sign of anxiety and stress. The voice box responds to the “fight and flight” response (in which anxiety is only the continuum) by tightening (holding the breath) in preparation to stabilise the thoracic region to provide greater strength to the limbs for fleeing or fighting.

As women participate more in verbal-based activities, and as their profile rises in the media, we are hearing women’s “voices” more and more. We may be hearing the sound of women under pressure.

This is a less likely hypothesis given the prevalence of vocal fry in social communication settings, where it likely that young women feel more at ease with each other.

In any case, it’s hard to ignore the fact that it’s fine to fry if you’re a man,  an older woman, or a person in a position of status, e.g., a news reader.

We also have to ask ourselves who is doing the criticising? I’m yet to hear young women criticise themselves for using it; in fact, it seems they don’t notice or comment that they are using it.

Vocal fry may be the new voice for young upwardly mobile American women. So who has the problem? Clearly not the young, empowered women in question.

It’s hard not to conclude that all this commentary about vocal fry is not actually about the voice, but about power and status, and who is allowed to have it.

Dr Cate Madill is a lecturer in speech pathology at the Faculty of Health Sciences. First published in The Conversation.

*

Would you like more information about studying speech pathology at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, October 19th, 2015

University of Sydney celebrates Speech Pathology Week

Alumni, staff and friends of the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences came together recently to celebrate the 2015 Speech Pathology Week.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

Learn more about studying speech pathology at the University of Sydney

Hosted by the discipline of speech pathology at Cumberland Campus Lidcombe, guests were given the opportunity to hear about the vital role that speech pathologists play in closing the communication gap in indigenous children.

Guest speakers at the event included Dr Alison Purcell, BAppSc (SpeechPath) (1980), MAppSc (SpeechPath) (1988), Ph.D. (Health Sciences) (2006) and Stephanie Ruston, BHlthSc (Hearing & Speech) (2006) MSLP (2008)

Dr Alison Purcell is a senior lecturer and speech pathologist at the University of Sydney. Her expertise in conducting studies that profile the speech and language skills of urban Aboriginal children led to an invitation to become part of the Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child Health (SEARCH).

Alison provided insight into the study, the collaboration involved and the community engagement, highlighting the need to continue and develop this crucial partnership. Alison’s key point was that “all health professionals and researchers working with Aboriginal communities need to be brave enough to step away from the safe expert role to being a true partner with our patients and communities by detecting their voices, comprehending their message and then acting on their wishes.”

Stephanie Ruston is a paediatric speech pathologist who has been working with Sydney’s South West community for the past seven years. She currently works at KARI Aboriginal Resources Inc., a not-for-profit community organisation in Liverpool. Stephanie discussed considerations of working with Aboriginal Children in Out of Home Care (foster care), the use of a developmental trauma based model to work with these children and the results that therapeutic interventions have had thus far.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

In common with other departments at the University of Sydney, the discipline of speech pathology promotes students’ development of generic  communication and teamwork skills, as well as discipline-specific knowledge and skills. The course is designed to promote self-direction and encourages the graduates to have a sense of their own individuality and creativity. The university offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Speech Language Pathology program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field, who wish to gain the requirements to become a speech pathologist.

Program: Master of Speech Language Pathology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years

Apply to the University of Sydney Speech Pathology School!

*

Are you wondering about speech pathology programs in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or phone Jaime toll free at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Friday, September 18th, 2015

Australian rehab sciences application deadlines

Are you interested in studying physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology or audiology in Australia? Here’s a rundown of which applications are still open!

Australian Physiotherapy Schools in Australia

You can study rehab sciences in Australia

Australian Physiotherapy Schools

The following Australian physiotherapy schools are accepting applications:

Australian Occupational Therapy Schools

The following Australian occupational therapy schools are accepting applications:

Australian Speech Pathology Schools

The following Australian speech pathology schools are accepting applications:

Australian Audiology Schools

The following Australian audiology schools are accepting applications:

*

If you have any questions about studying physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, or audiology in Australia, contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Jaime can help outline your options and include you on the monthly Australian Rehabilitation Sciences Newsletter mailing list!

Friday, June 26th, 2015

Sydney speech pathology student wins Three Minute Thesis

Could you explain years of intense research about a specific area in just three minutes? That’s what Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences students did on Wednesday 10 June at the annual Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition at Cumberland campus.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

Sydney Speech Pathology student Amy Freeman-Sanderson wins 3MT competition

This year’s winner was speech pathology student Amy Freeman-Sanderson with the topic “Is it time to speak?” Amy’s research focused on speech pathology intervention for verbal communication provided to patients with a tracheostomy within the critical care setting.

“Loss of voice due to tracheostomy insertion has been described by patients as one of, if not, the most traumatic part of their hospital admission,” said Professor Sharon Kilbreath, who gave the official welcome at the event.

“The primary aim of Amy’s research is to compare early versus standard speech pathology intervention for these patients with the focus on timing of return to verbal communication and patient reported quality of life measurements.”

The 3MT competition is held at the faculty each year and is an outlet for students to practice explaining their research to people who are not familiar with their field. The task is aimed at advancing students’ skills when applying for funding or engaging media attention.

This year, Health Sciences had seven entrants.

“It was an extremely successful and enjoyable night,” said event organiser Fiona Pearson. “We had a really high calibre of presentations; our Health Sciences students really upped their competitive game.”

Amy now advances to the 3MT finals of the university competition which are held during Open Day on 29 August. The faculty wishes Amy the very best of luck.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

In common with other departments at the University of Sydney, the discipline of speech pathology promotes students’ development of generic  communication and teamwork skills, as well as discipline-specific knowledge and skills. The course is designed to promote self-direction and encourages the graduates to have a sense of their own individuality and creativity. The university offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Speech Language Pathology program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field, who wish to gain the requirements to become a speech pathologist.

Program: Master of Speech Language Pathology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years
Application Deadline: October 1, 2015 (Australia time). Applications are assessed on a rolling basis (as they are received). All application documents must be at the OzTREKK office by Wednesday, September 30 at noon.

Apply to the University of Sydney Speech Pathology School!

*

Are you wondering about speech pathology programs in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or phone Jaime toll free at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Apply to Sydney Speech Pathology School!

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School applications are now open for 2016 intake via OzTREKK!

The Master of Speech Language Pathology at the University of Sydney is intended for graduates who hold a PhD, master’s or bachelor’s degree in a relevant area. The curriculum is designed to enable students to learn in a way that resembles the clinical practice of speech language pathology, and comprises case-based learning and clinical placements to help students acquire the skills necessary to qualify and practice as speech pathologists in Australia.

Sydney Speech Pathology School

Learn more about Sydney Speech Language Pathology

Master of Speech Language Pathology

Speech pathology at Sydney has a long and proud history of producing high-quality graduates who go on to be expert clinicians, leaders of the profession and international researchers in communication sciences and disorders. The university’s speech pathology discipline is the largest speech pathology department in the Australian state of New South Wales and one of the largest in Australia.

Program: Master of Speech Language Pathology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBC. For the 2015 intake, the application deadline was October 1, 2014.

Entry Requirements

The Master of Speech Language Pathology program welcomes students from all backgrounds.

To be eligible to apply, you must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree from a recognized university; and
  • achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 4.5, which the University of Sydney states is approximately equivalent to a credit average or better. A credit average at the University of Sydney is between a 65 and 74%. Your grades assessed for admission are based on your highest-ranked university degree.

It is recommended that you apply for this program if you have achieved a minimum 65% cumulative average in your university studies. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply.

Apply to the University of Sydney Speech Pathology School!


*

If you have any questions about how to apply to University of Sydney Speech Pathology School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or phone 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Apply to an Australian Speech Pathology School for the 2016 intake

Australian Speech Pathology School applications are now open for 2016 intake via OzTREKK!

Australian Speech Pathology Schools in Australia

Learn more about how you can study speech pathology in Australia

Speech pathology is a health profession that falls under the area of Human Communication Sciences. Speech pathology is the diagnosis, management and treatment of individuals who are unable to communicate effectively or who have difficulty with feeding and swallowing.

With few speech pathology programs offered by Canadian universities and since admission into these programs are increasingly competitive, graduate-entry speech pathology programs in Australia are a top choice for Canadians seeking to gain qualifications as a speech pathology.

Australian universities offer undergraduate and graduate-entry professional certification programs in speech pathology, as well as a wide range of postgraduate options in specialized areas. Speech pathology programs in Australia aim to equip students with the theoretical knowledge, skills and professional attributes necessary for a career in speech pathology. Graduate qualifications in speech pathology from Australian Speech Pathology Schools are recognized internationally, and graduates are eligible to apply for certification in Canada.

*

For information about speech pathology program entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, and scholarships, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Sydney speech pathology researchers stress importance of reading to kids

Researchers from the Kids Talk Lab at the University of Sydney encourage parents to give children books to help develop vital speech, language and communication skills.

Speech pathologist Dr Elise Baker said many parents worry about their children’s speech, but reading together is an easy and effective way to focus on improving speech and language skills.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

Study speech language pathology at Sydney Uni

“Reading together gives children the opportunity to hear speech sounds in words, to talk about new words and meanings and to have conversations about ideas, feelings and events—all of which are critical to communication development,” said Dr Baker.

Dr Baker and Dr Natalie Munro from the University of Sydney Speech Pathology School studied book reading interactions between parents and children and found the way parents read with their children was the most important factor influencing the development of speech and language skills.

“It’s not about the quantity of books read, but about the quality of the interaction,” said Dr Munro. “It’s the conversation that happens between the pages of the book that turns book reading into a real learning experience.”

Expert tips on using story time to develop children’s speech and language skills:

1. Spend quality time reading with your children
It takes time to read with your kids. Parents shouldn’t rush through the book from front to back, you need to give children the chance to make comments about what they see and think.

2. Encourage interaction
If your child points to the text, read the word aloud and talk about the letter sounds that make up the word.

3. Stop and summarise
Define any new words that your child may be unfamiliar with and check in to see how much your child understands.

4. Ask good questions
Open-ended questions are a great way to actively engage children. Begin with simple questions like “what’s happening here?” or “what can you see?” and then move onto more challenging ones like “what do you think will happen next?”.

5. Choose books that focus on your kids’ problem areas
If your child is having difficulty pronouncing the “k” sound and says “tar” or “dar” for the word “car,” read loads of books about cars, cows, castles, kings or kangaroos.

“With so many children’s books on the market it can be hard to know what to choose, but the best book is the one that is read together,” said Dr Baker.

University of Sydney Speech Pathology School

In common with other departments at the University of Sydney, the discipline of speech pathology promotes students’ development of generic  communication and teamwork skills, as well as discipline-specific knowledge and skills. The course is designed to promote self-direction and encourages the graduates to have a sense of their own individuality and creativity. The university offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Speech Language Pathology program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field, who wish to gain the requirements to become a speech pathologist.

Program: Master of Speech Language Pathology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years

Apply to the University of Sydney Speech Pathology School!

*

Are you wondering about speech pathology programs in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Speech Pathology Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or phone Sarah toll free at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.