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Articles categorized as ‘University of Newcastle Science Programs’

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

Newcastle visual communications student draws interest from Nickelodeon

University of Newcastle animation student has been hand-picked from more than 900 international entries to produce an animated film for children’s television network Nickelodeon.

Dan Smith, a third-year Bachelor of Visual Communication Design student, will move to Melbourne to work with a prestigious animation studio to complete his short film, titled Blair and the Sea Pancake.

Newcastle visual communications student draws interest from Nickelodeon

Study at UON!

“I still can’t believe my work has been chosen. My film is about a pair of loose-cannon larrikins, one human and the other a stingray, who bumble through life together,” he said.

Mr Smith’s project is the result of his entry into the 2016 Nickelodeon Animated Shorts Program earlier this year. Participants were invited to develop a storyboard aimed at a young audience and nominate a production studio they would like to work with to bring their idea to fruition.

Mr Smith’s Melbourne-based collaborators remain a secret to the outside world, but he revealed they are a company he had admired for some time.

“I couldn’t be more excited to bring my idea to life with the help of a studio I really respect.

“I’ll be working alongside some of the leaders in the industry and will be able to learn from the best. The experience will be invaluable,” he said.

Dan Smith won the Newcastle International Animation Festival Animate Daniel Johns competition in 2015. His work was selected by musician Daniel Johns (former Silverchair frontman) as part of the official music video for his song “Going on 16.”

“Winning the Daniel Johns competition opened up some great new doors for me. As a result, I’ve had the opportunity to work on other awesome projects like Sesame Street,” he said.

Although Mr Smith’s time at University of Newcastle is coming to an end after graduation, he said he is thrilled to have started his career in Newcastle.

“The best thing about studying at UON is the work I’ve had the opportunity to be involved in. Newcastle is attracting hordes of creatives, which means I’ve been able to work on huge projects from a relatively small place.

“The bottom line is it doesn’t matter where you’re based, animation has the power to open up awesome doors and I’m so excited about where this path is leading me,” he said.

Dan Smith hopes his work with Nickelodeon will lead to assisting on further projects with the international company. Blair and the Sea Pancake will be produced by the end of 2016 to be released in 2017.

Visual communication design at the University of Newcastle

Visual communication design, incorporating graphic design, is an exciting, evolving, diverse and growing area of specialisation which brings together information from various sources into a visually dominant form. Advances in communication technology, such as those provided by the web and mobile devices, are increasing the opportunities for designers in order to keep up with the ever-growing demand for visual stimuli.

When you study visual communication design at the University of Newcastle, you engage with international designers and educators whose range of expertise cover recognisable specialist areas such as graphic design, advertising, animation, illustration and web design. While studying a Bachelor of Visual Communication Design you will develop a breadth of multi-platform skills that will allow you to provide visual solutions for all sorts of client requirements.

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Learn how you can study visual communications design at the University of Newcastle! Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com for more information!

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

University of Newcastle teacher named Australia’s PR Educator of the Year

University of Newcastle teaching excellence is again in the spotlight with Communication Senior Lecturer, Dr Melanie James, named Australia’s “PR Educator of the Year” at the Public Relations Institute of Australia’s (PRIA) National Golden Target Awards held recently in Hobart.

University of Newcastle Information Technology

Senior Lecturer Dr James (Photo credit: UON)

Dr James, Deputy Head of the School of Design, Communication and IT said the result highlighted the calibre of the communication degree offered at the University of Newcastle (UON).

“This award recognises the innovative teaching practices applied to the teaching of PR and Communication subjects at UON, and strong track record of producing talented and successful graduates,” said Dr James.

Dr James said her teaching style encouraged students to gain valuable real-world insights to prepare them for a successful working life.

“My teaching philosophy centres on the view that teaching is not about delivering content but is the act of designing experiences that encourage and enable student learning.

“My teaching has always focused on providing opportunities for students to construct contextual meaning rather than focusing on students being passive receivers of information that I impart to them—a constructivist approach to learning,” said Dr James.

With experience working in senior management roles in strategic communication, government communication and public relations across a number of sectors, Dr James brings extensive professional expertise to the classroom.

The University of Newcastle lecturer has authored four books, numerous journal articles, book chapters and conference papers. Her most recent book, Positioning Theory and Strategic Communication: A new approach to public relations research and practice was published by Routledge in 2014.

The School of Design, Communication and Information Technology at the University of Newcastle brings together a range of disciplines across communication, design, information technology and natural history illustration that are at the forefront of today’s interconnected world.

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Find out more about studying communication and information technology at the University of Newcastle! Contact OzTREKK  Admission Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

Newcastle academics honoured with Excellence in Science and Engineering Awards

Two University of Newcastle academics have been honoured with prestigious accolades at the 2014 NSW Science and Engineering Awards.

UON’s Professor Nick Talley received the Excellence in Biological Sciences award, while Professor Behdad Moghtaderi was the recipient of the Renewable Energy Innovation award.

University of Newcastle

Study science and engineering at Newcastle

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) Professor Kevin Hall said the impressive results were further evidence of the university’s distinguished research reputation.

“Professor Talley and Professor Moghtaderi are at the forefront of their respective fields, and the university is delighted to see their outstanding contributions acknowledged,” Professor Hall said.

“We are immensely proud of both researchers’ achievements. The university’s continued success in these annual awards demonstrates the high calibre of our academics and their research outcomes.”

The NSW Science and Engineering Awards recognise the achievements of leading researchers and their efforts to generate economic, health, environmental or technological benefits for the state.

Professor Talley is an internationally renowned gastroenterological research leader, who specialises in unexplained disorders affecting nerves and muscles of the gut, including irritable bowel syndrome and severe indigestion. He has been credited with a number of seminal breakthroughs, and his latest work involving the link between the brain and the gut has the potential to revolutionise thinking across the field.

Professor Talley is President of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. In June last year, he was appointed the University of Newcastle‘s Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research). He is now on sabbatical undertaking further research at the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI).

Professor Moghtaderi is a world-leader energy technologies research, and was awarded the innovation prize for his GRANEX™ heat engine invention. The engine turns low-grade heat sources that may not otherwise be viably usable into emission-free electricity. It can be applied to a range of diverse heat sources, including renewable energy, process industries, transport systems and commercial and residential buildings.

Professor Moghtaderi is UON’s Head of Discipline of Chemical Engineering, as well as Director of the Frontier Energy Technologies Research Centre at the Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources (NIER).

University of Newcastle School of Engineering

The University of Newcastle School of Engineering is dedicated to research and training in the disciplines of Chemical, Civil, Environmental, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, and Surveying. The engineering school’s programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, the school received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy and Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

Science Programs at the University of Newcastle

The Faculty of Science and Information Technology has a strong commitment to fundamental and applied research with equally high international standards. They support a broad-based program over a wide range of research activities. Within the schools they have established international reputations and formed strong, viable research groups and are increasing their industry partnerships in the Hunter region and beyond through applied research and development collaborations.

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Learn more about studying science and engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about how you can study in Australia.

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

University of Newcastle’s climate change discovery

University of Newcastle hydrodynamics expert, Dr Mike Meylan, part of the research team behind a recent groundbreaking discovery that linked the effects of storm-generated waves on sea ice behaviours, said the finding could help predict future global climate trends.

University of Newcastle Environmental Sciences

Study at the University of Newcastle, Australia

The study, Storm-induced sea-ice breakup and the implications for ice extent, published in Nature, measured the impact of storm-driven waves on the edge of sea ice in the polar regions, finding large waves had a greater impact on breaking sea ice than originally thought.

On World Environment Day, Thursday, June 5, Dr Meylan said the dynamic role of waves was understudied and his team’s research could be crucial in forecasting global warming in the future.

Climate change is a difficult thing to model; we only get one shot at guessing the global environment in one hundred years,” Dr Meylan said.

“Sea ice has an important role in regulating the global environment and current climate models fail to capture the cause of expansion and retreat of sea ice in both polar regions.

“This new research sheds light on the power of large waves in breaking up sea ice at a much farther distance from the ice edge than predicted, and could be the missing link to understanding the behaviours of sea ice today and in the future.”

Researchers used sensors dropped onto ice floes to measure and transmit the energy from waves at the sea ice margin, finding that storms hundreds of kilometres away were causing large waves that fractured sea ice at an astounding distance from the ice edge of the Arctic and Antarctica.

Previous studies have predicted that changes in the atmosphere will lead to increased wave heights along the sea edge of both regions in the future, accelerating sea ice retreat and posing significant threats to the global environment.

“The weather in places like Antarctica can have profound effects on that experienced by countries like Australia so it is important that we take a global approach when developing climate models.

“Wave research could be pivotal to improving our understanding of future trends and could help advance model accuracy for a better indication of the Earth’s climate in the future.”

Within the Faculty of Science at the University of Newcastle, School of Environmental and Life Sciences is one of the largest in the university and has a diversity of science-based disciplines. The academic staff are all specialists in their fields and are committed to delivering the highest quality outcomes in research and teaching. The school strives for excellence and provides a unique opportunity for science training via the rich multi-disciplinary profile of its staff and facilities.

Main fields of study include at the University of Newcastle Faculty of Science and Information Technology include

  • Biological, Chemical and Marine Sciences
  • Biotechnology and Food Science
  • Exercise and Sport Science
  • Earth Science
  • Environmental Science and Resource Management
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Physical Science

Find out more about environmental sciences at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Friday, March 14th, 2014

OzTREKK Funny Friday

The Mathematician’s Dictionary

Clearly: I don’t want to write down all the “in between” steps.

Trivial: If I have to show you how to do this, you’re in the wrong class.

Australian Science degrees

Happy Pi Day!

It can easily be shown: No more than four hours are needed to prove it.

Check for yourself: This is the boring part of the proof, so you can do it on your own time.

Hint: The hardest of several possible ways to do a proof.

Brute force: Four special cases, three counting arguments and two long inductions.

Elegant proof: Requires no previous knowledge of the subject matter and is fewer than ten lines long.

Similarly: At least one line of the proof of this case is the same as before.

Two-line proof: I’ll leave out everything but the conclusion, you can’t question ’em if you can’t see ’em.

Briefly: I’m running out of time, so I’ll just write and talk faster.

Proceed formally: Manipulate symbols by the rules without any hint of their true meaning.

Proof omitted: Trust me. It’s true.

Australian Math Degrees

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Are you interested in math and science? Find out more about studying science at an Australian university! Email OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about science degrees and how you can study in Australia.

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Melanoma research at the University of Newcastle

A new protein that mediates the survival and death of melanoma cells has been identified by University of Newcastle cancer researchers, bringing hope for a new treatment method for the disease.

University of Newcastle

Study at the University of Newcastle

While there is currently no cure for melanoma once it has spread beyond the original site, Professor Xu Dong Zhang and Dr Lei Jin from HMRI’s Cancer Research Program are examining the role of the protein RIPK1 in melanoma cell growth.

They are testing the protein’s effect and its responses to treatment to identify its potential as a future therapy for melanoma.

“Australia has the highest incidence of melanoma in the world, with more than 12,500 new cases of melanoma diagnosed every year,” Professor Zhang said. “It can be treated successfully if caught early; however, metastatic melanoma is one of the most difficult cancers to treat, with a cure remaining elusive.”

In 2014 Professor Zhang and his team will examine how increased expression of the RIPK1 protein causes the activation of pro-survival signalling pathways and how these pathways contribute to melanoma growth.

“The overall aim of the project is to find a new target for intervention to improve treatment outcomes for melanoma,” Professor Zhang said, explaining that studying this protein will provide them with new information about the whys and hows of metastatic melanoma.

“The study will also identify molecular markers that can be used for sub-classification of melanomas and help in the development of a personalized treatment. We hope to apply the information from this project to preclinical and clinical studies and eventually to the management of melanoma patients.”

By understanding the role of the RIPK1 protein, Professor Zhang hopes to identify if the increased expression of the protein can be used as a molecular marker to predict progression and resistance to melanoma treatments.

* Professor Xu Dong Zhang and Dr Lei Jin are members of the HMRI Cancer research program. HMRI is a partnership between Hunter New England Health, the University of Newcastle and the community. Funding was provided by HMRI and supported by Keith Tulloch Wine and The Rotary Club of Newcastle.

Are you interested in science and research programs at the University of Newcastle? Want to study in Australia? Contact OzTREKK  Admission Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355 for more information about science degrees available at Australian universities.

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

University of Newcastle researchers recognized in TIME magazine

University of Newcastle researchers are responsible for one of the world’s most significant inventions of 2013, according to TIME Magazine‘s 25 Best Inventions of the year 2013, just released.

University of Newcastle science

Will the gastric brooding frog make it back to the pond?

The Lazarus Project has developed de-extinction technology which will resurrect vanished species and is the only Australian invention named in the global list.

The breakthrough genome technology, which has been successfully applied to the gastric brooding frog, extinct since 1983, could herald a new era in global biodiversity and conservation management.

In its introduction to this year’s list, TIME said, “What makes an invention great? Sometimes it solves a problem you didn’t think could be solved. Maybe you didn’t realize you needed to resurrect an extinct frog. Now you do.”

The resurrection of the gastric brooding frog may also have implications for the medical world.

“The gastric brooding frog swallows externally fertilized eggs into its stomach, which then operates as a uterus. No other living creature can do this. This unique ability could help the medical world work out how to manage gastric secretions in the gut,” said Michael Mahony, Project Leader, Professor of Biology at the University of Newcastle and internationally renowned “Frog Whisperer.”

Known as somatic cell nuclear transplantation, the cloning technology had never previously been successfully applied to dead tissue. In repeated experiments over five years, the nuclei of donor eggs from the distantly related great barred frog, Mixophyes fasciolatus, were inactivated and replaced with dead nuclei from the gastric brooding frog which resulted in eggs spontaneously dividing and growing to early embryo stage.

Amazingly, the Lazarus Project team recovered the extinct frog cell nuclei from tissue samples collected in the 1970s and kept for 40 years in a conventional deep freezer.

“The tissue samples we recovered from the last known laboratory to have a colony of these species had not been treated with cryoprotectant, or anti-freeze to stop the cells from expanding and becoming damaged during the freezing process. It wasn’t until we looked at the cells under the micro-scope that we could see the cell walls were still intact,” said the biology professor.

The research team believes a human spread fungus was the primary cause of extinction.

“If it is clear that we have exterminated a species, we arguably have an obligation to bring it back,” said Professor Mahony.

The frozen specimens were preserved and provided by Professor Mike Tyler, of the University of Adelaide, who extensively studied both species of gastric-brooding frog—R. silus and R. vitellinus—before they vanished in the wild in 1979 and 1985 respectively.

“Recognition by a global publication as prestigious as TIME Magazine is evidence of University of Newcastle researchers driving world-class innovation. As global leaders in their field, they are developing solutions for the world’s most significant problems,” said Vice-Chancellor, Professor Caroline McMillen.

Science Programs at the University of Newcastle

The School of Environmental and Life Sciences (SELS) at the University of Newcastle is one of the largest schools in the university, and forms part of the Faculty of Science and Information Technology. Specializations offered through the school include

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Development Studies
  • Environmental Science and Management
  • Geography and Environmental Studies
  • Earth Sciences
  • Food Science and Human Nutrition
  • Sustainable Resource Management
  • Exercise and Sports Science
  • Marine Science

This school generates enthusiasm for learning and research training that is unique because of the diverse and integrated specialties of the academics coupled with the availability of an impressive array of analytical equipment, laboratory facilities and field-research support resources.

The research and laboratory facilities are excellent and there are opportunities to develop multidisciplinary skills and build research networks via the nature of the diverse fields of expertise within the disciplines. Field work is a major component of many of the science degree programs and many opportunities exist to develop these skills in areas of geology, geography, ecology and marine biology.

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Are you interested in science and research programs at the University of Newcastle? Want to study in Australia? Contact OzTREKK for more information about science degrees available at Australian universities.

Monday, October 28th, 2013

University of Newcastle launches marine smartphone app

A free smartphone application which allows fishers and divers to easily report sightings of unusual fish and marine species has been developed by marine biologists from the University of Newcastle and the University of Tasmania, was launched at the “Under the Sea Film Festival” at Avoca Beach, NSW recently. The application is designed to boost science literacy and “citizen science” participation while capturing valuable insights into the changing behaviours of sea life.

University of Newcastle Science

Newcastle studies marine life

As they are warming at three to four times the global average, some seas along the coast of Australia are impacting marine ecosystems and species, affecting fish growth, reproduction and behaviour. Fish may respond by searching for their preferred water temperatures, often heading southwards to cooler waters in Australian oceans. The new smartphone application, “Redmap” (Range Extension Database and Mapping project), uses crowd sourcing and community data to track such changes in species distribution along Australia’s vast coastline.

“It is hoped the smartphone application will encourage people to log sightings,” said Redmap New South Wales leader and University of Newcastle Associate Professor Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, explaining that the application will simplify the logging process for their network of citizen scientists.

Redmap encourages Australians to upload photos and sightings of marine life that aren’t commonly found at their local fishing, diving and swimming spots. These community observations help scientists track which species are shifting their usual home range in response to warming seas. Already divers, fishers and the public have shared hundreds of sightings on Redmap including fish, turtles, sharks, rays, lobsters and sea slugs.

A network of more than 60 marine scientists across the country review the sightings submitted to Redmap to verify the species identity and ensure high-quality data.

The application is supported by an Australian Government Inspiring Australia grant, which aims to boost science literacy and teach the value of science in caring for our environment; the New South Wales Environmental Trust and the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania.

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Within the Faculty of Science and Information Technology at the University of Newcastle, the School of Environmental and Life Sciences is one of the largest in the university and has a diversity of science-based disciplines. The academic staff are all specialists in their fields and are committed to delivering the highest-quality outcomes in research and teaching.

Find out more about studying science at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

University of Newcastle researchers leapfrog ahead in world-first

University of Newcastle researchers have successfully developed a method to freeze frog embryonic cells in a world-first breakthrough that could slow the threat of extinction to hundreds of frog species.

The researchers have separated, isolated and frozen the embryonic cells of an Australian ground frog (the Striped Marsh Frog, Limnodynastes peronii), using cryopreservation techniques that will now allow for cloning.

This is the first time anyone in the world has successfully used slow-freezing techniques on amphibian cells, project leader at the University of Newcastle, Professor Michael Mahony, said.

“Almost 200 frog species have been lost in the past 30 years due to disease and a further 200 species face imminent threat—this is the worst rate of extinction of any vertebrate group,” he said.

“Amphibian eggs and early embryos, unlike human eggs and embryos, are large in size and have traditionally presented a challenge to researchers attempting to cryo-preserve and store frog genomes, as they would shatter during the freezing process.

“The new technique, developed by our University of Newcastle researchers, will act as an insurance policy to buy us time for species on the edge of extinction, as we search for answers to diseases and other threats.”

Professor Mahony said the development would have wider implications for other species facing extinction.

“Not only will it help us preserve the genetic diversity of frogs, but this discovery could also help in the conservation of other species with large embryonic cells, such as fish.”

The University of Newcastle is leading the world on research into amphibian protection. This latest discovery follows on from recent work with other universities on the Lazarus project, which generated live embryos using cells from an extinct Australian frog.

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Science Programs at the University of Newcastle

The School of Environmental and Life Sciences (SELS) at the University of Newcastle is one of the largest schools in the university, and forms part of the Faculty of Science and Information Technology. Specializations offered through the school include

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Development Studies
  • Environmental Science and Management
  • Geography and Environmental Studies
  • Earth Sciences
  • Food Science and Human Nutrition
  • Sustainable Resource Management
  • Exercise and Sports Science
  • Marine Science

This school generates enthusiasm for learning and research training that is unique because of the diverse and integrated specialties of the academics coupled with the availability of an impressive array of analytical equipment, laboratory facilities and field-research support resources.

The research and laboratory facilities are excellent and there are opportunities to develop multidisciplinary skills and build research networks via the nature of the diverse fields of expertise within the disciplines. Field work is a major component of many of the science degree programs and many opportunities exist to develop these skills in areas of geology, geography, ecology and marine biology.

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Are you interested in science and research programs at the University of Newcastle? Want to study in Australia?

Contact OzTREKK for more information about science degrees available at Australian universities.

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Faculty of Science and Information Technology at the University of Newcastle

The Lonely Planet lists the city of Newcastle, Australia as being one of the top 10 best cities in the world. Set on a breathtaking stretch of Australia’s Pacific Ocean coastline, Newcastle is the only city in Australia where the central business district is positioned simultaneously on the beach and the harbour waterfront.

The Faculty of Science and Information Technology at the University of Newcastle provides study and research programs in fast-moving fields that make our world tick. Blending sciences, mathematics, IT, communication, and design, the faculty offers degree programs at a number of campuses. Wherever appropriate, these programs carry professional accreditation.

The Faculty of Science and Information Technology‘s main fields of study include

Award-winning staff with a professional outlook

The University of Newcastle has a commitment to the training and professional development of their staff. New academic staff are required to undertake professional training in tertiary teaching, and teaching performance and innovation is an aspect considered in promotion applications. Several of University of Newcastle teaching staff have won prestigious teaching awards, and non-teaching staff have won excellence awards for their role in the provision of outstanding student support services.

Global opportunities in research

Most academic staff at the University of Newcastle are active researchers, and many are leaders in their particular fields. Staff are encouraged to use results of their research to inform their teaching. In addition, students have the chance to learn alongside some of the world’s leading researchers. For example, many degree programs provide the opportunity for research project placements, in which students can study and work in research groups alongside researchers and on current important problems.

Schools and key areas

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Would you like to learn more about the Faculty of Science and Information Technology at the University of Newcastle?

Contact OzTREKK for more information science programs and IT programs at Australian universities and about how you can study in Australia!

Email OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada 1 866-698-7355 for more information about Australian universities.