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Articles categorized as ‘University of Sydney Public Health School’

Monday, June 12th, 2017

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

The effect of dog ownership on adult human health is the focus of a new pilot study by the University of Sydney.

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

Do dogs make people feel happy?

Led by Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney School of Public Health, the research team is seeking 100 non-dog owners to participate in the trial—people who are considering owning a dog as well as those who have no interest in doing so.

“Dog ownership is very popular in Australia with over 40 percent of households owning at least one dog,” Associate Professor Stamatakis said. “While anecdotal evidence suggests dog ownership is beneficial for human health, there is currently scant scientific evidence to back up this perception.

“Our research will provide valuable insight into the health benefits of dog ownership which could support programs promoting and enabling dog ownership as a means to increase physical activity, improve general health and prevent cardiovascular and mental illness.”

Differences in physical activity, cardiovascular and metabolic health, and psychosocial well-being will be assessed for three groups: participants who acquire a dog within one month, after an eight-month waiting period, or do not adopt at all.

Over the course of eight months, participants in the Physical & Affective Wellbeing Study of dog owners (PAWS) pilot will be asked to complete a small number of questionnaires over the phone and visit the Charles Perkins Centre or be visited at home three times for some simple physical measurements.

“These initial results will also inform the methods of a much larger trial, the first controlled trial to examine the health effect of ‘real world’ dog ownership,” Associate Professor Stamatakis explained.

What is public health?

Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens. Public health practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and providing programs and services to address these needs. Studying in this field as an international student gives Canadians an understanding of the public health realm on an international scale, making Australia a top choice for Canadians.

At the Sydney School of Public Health, the Master of Public Health program is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

Study at the Sydney School of Public Health

Public health is
•   Preventing disease
•   Promoting health
•   Prolonging life

How do we encourage a more physically active population? How can we campaign to reduce tobacco use? How do we influence health policy?

Public health analyses and acts upon the problems that prevent us from enjoying a good healthy life. Achieving these goals comes in many forms: generating knowledge of the public health problem, advocating for change and solutions, and helping implement those changes. Above all, public health is about people – often the most vulnerable in our communities – giving them the power of education and programs which will improve their health, prevent diseases and prolong their lives.

Every day, graduates from the Sydney School of Public Health are making a difference to the lives of people in Australia and across the globe.

Sydney public health students and alumni talk about what drew them to the field, and where their postgraduate studies are taking them.

Learning opportunities are aimed at developing the essential knowledge and required skills of practitioners in the practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems to improve conditions and outcomes. The programs are offered at a graduate diploma and master’s degree level with an emphasis on a modern approach to improving health outcomes within disadvantaged and developing communities.

With a large number of units of study to choose from, you can tailor the program to suit your individual needs. You may choose to take a variety of subjects or study subjects within one of five pathways:

  1. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Communicable Disease)
  2. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Injury)
  3. Public Health Research
  4. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Chronic Disease)
  5. Health Economics/Health Policy

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, June 17th, 2016

Sydney public health researchers awarded top grant

Public health researchers at the University of Sydney tackled one of the biggest issues facing modern healthcare: turning healthy people into sick patients due to over-diagnosis and over-treatment made possible by new, highly sensitive screening and diagnostic tests.

Sydney Public health researchers awarded top NHMRC grant

Learn more about Sydney Public Health School

A panel of seven experts explored the hotly debated topics at a public forum from on May 30 at the university.

“We will consider a radical idea that sometimes wiser healthcare means less healthcare. Or at least, less healthcare for people who don’t need it, so we can give more healthcare to people who need it,” said Professor Alexandra Barratt, from the Sydney School of Public Health.

The research team was recently awarded a $2.5-million National Health and Medical Research Council grant to establish a Centre for Research Excellence (CRE) to develop strategies to mitigate the over-diagnosis and over-treatment issues.

“Recently, we have witnessed an explosion of new diagnostic and screening technologies available including advanced imaging, biomarkers and genomic tests. Some of these tests are even marketed directly to the public,” added Professor Barratt, CRE Chief Investigator.

“Ideally these tests improve health by identifying diseases or risks that need to be treated; however, sometimes these tests lead to over-diagnosis and over-treatment which not only harms patients but wastes health resources through unnecessary procedures.

“The CRE will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease. New diagnostics are already appearing in clinical use in these areas, and these diseases account for a large burden of death, disease and health care spending in Australia.

Public health researcher and ethicist Associate Professor Stacy Carter said, “Most importantly, this research is about improving health outcomes for patients, in Australia and internationally.

“Our findings will assist patients, citizens, healthcare funders and health professionals to adopt helpful new technologies and avoid harmful new technologies to get the best possible outcomes from our healthcare system.”

Health psychologist Professor Kirsten McCaffery said “We are an internationally leading, multidisciplinary team and Australia is at the forefront of this new area of research. This funding puts us in a unique position to continue and expand the world class work we are doing.”

Public Health at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the University of Sydney focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying public health at the University of Sydney, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Sydney public health researchers advise us to take a stand

Workers who use sit-stand desks are just as productive as those who use traditional desks while enjoying a host of possible health benefits, according to a world-first study by researchers at the University of Sydney.

Sydney Dental School

Sydney researchers study benefits of sit-stand desks (Photo: University of Sydney)

Published in Preventive Medicine Reports, the pilot study measured the effects on the productivity of 30 call-centre workers using powered sit-stand desks.

Despite a growing number of intervention studies looking at the impact of sit-stand desks on workers’ sitting and standing behaviours, relatively little is known about the effects on worker productivity.

“Our study found that workers who increased their standing by up to 60-90 minutes a day were more active and felt more energised than workers who used traditional desks, while not compromising their work output,” said lead researcher Dr Josephine Chau, from the University of Sydney School of Public Health.

“They reported being more satisfied and feeling more productive at work.

“The proportion of workers who reported they had enough energy throughout their workday increased seven-fold, from 6 per cent to 44 percent when using sit-stand desks,” she said.

The findings of the study are good news for office workers who want to make the case for sit-stand desks in their workplaces.

“Sit-stand desks are a good option for office workers who want to reduce the amount of time they spend sitting during their working day,” Dr Chau said.

“A growing body of research suggests that prolonged periods of sitting is linked to a higher risk of developing chronic diseases, including obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. These health risks are particularly relevant for people with largely sedentary jobs, such as office workers.

“We must be aware of the dangers of our increasingly sedentary lifestyles and do all we can to combat this. A sit-stand desk is one of many things you can do to improve your health, but exercising is crucial.

“People shouldn’t assume that a standing desk means they don’t have to exercise. We need to sit less and move more,” she said.

Co-investigator Dr Lina Engelen, University of Sydney, said that prolonged standing also has its own risks.

“People need to be mindful to build up their standing time gradually and avoid going from no standing to standing all day at work.

“It’s a bit like training for a marathon—you don’t go from running 0 km to 42 km overnight. You need to help your body adjust to it gradually. Ideally, workers could aim for around two hours of standing or non-sitting time per working day.

The study was conducted over 5 months with more than 30 staff from the telecommunications company Optus as part of their health and well-being program.  It is a world-first in terms of a sit-stand desk intervention in a natural office environment using a sample of participants in jobs unrelated to health.

The research was a collaboration between the University of Sydney, Southern Cross University and Optus and was supported by a Sydney Medical School Early Career Researcher Grant.

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If you have any questions about studying public health at the University of Sydney, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

University of Sydney experts discuss Zika virus

University of Sydney public health experts say a causal relationship between Zika virus infection during pregnancy and microcephaly is strongly suspected but not yet proven as the WHO declared the mosquito-borne virus a global public health threat.

The World Health Organisation Director-General Margaret Chan has declared the outbreak of Zika virus a public health emergency—only the fourth time the WHO has declared a state of emergency.

It’s estimated there are more than four million people living in areas populated by the Yellow Fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti), which is responsible for spreading the disease.

University of Sydney Public Health School

Learn more studying at the University of Sydney

Yellow fever mosquito, which is present in far north Queensland, can also spread dengue fever, chikungunya, yellow fever viruses and other diseases.

The Pan American Health Organisation says that Zika has spread in 24 nations and territories in the Americas, with reports it is rife in Asia.

“Declaring Zika virus a public health emergency has happened relatively early in the outbreak compared to the comparable declaration for Ebola virus,” says Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne, a medical virologist from the University of Sydney.

Addressing a media conference on Feb. 2, he said the WHO declaration reflects a need by the global community to deal with infectious disease emergencies more rapidly.

“We need to communicate the risks to these people. We need the global community to get on board to aid in control efforts in South America and the other areas affected by the Zika virus.”

The virus is suspected of causing thousand of birth defects in Brazil but no firm causal link has been established. The first reported case of Zika infection was in 1947 in a macaque in Ziika forest, Uganda, after which the virus is also named.

“The emergency alert is a call to arms to focus on research in this area, particularly to establish a clear link between the Zika virus and the reported subsequent birth defects, especially microcephaly, which refers to reduced head size and brain damage,” he said.

Pregnant women travelling to countries with the Zika virus should apply insect repellents containing DEET or picaridin early in the morning, said University of Sydney entomologist, Dr Cameron Webb.

While echoing a federal government warning to reconsider travelling to 22 nations where Zika is transmitted, Dr Webb acknowledged it might be impossible for everyone to avoid or delay their travel plans.

Explaining how transmission of the virus could occur in Australia, Dr Webb said, “What happens is someone steps off the plane, shortly after they arrive in Australia they’re bitten by a local yellow fever mosquito who becomes infected and can pass the virus on to the local community.

“In the absence of the yellow fever mosquito in our major cities, the risk of outbreak are low,” he said. “We do have these mosquitoes in far north Queensland, areas around Cairns and Townsville are the places where we might likely get a small outbreak of Zika virus.”

Dr Webb said that if the virus were to spread to far north Queensland, Australian authorities would be well prepared. The yellow fever mosquito posed a threat to people because it had migrated out of the jungle and into the cities, but it could not survive in the southern states as the winters were too cold, he noted.

“Because 80 per cent of infections are asymptomatic there’s quite a significant likelihood of infected people returning to Australia, but unless they happen to travel to far north Queensland, the risk of them being bitten by an appropriate mosquito is relatively small,” said the University of Sydney’s Professor Lyn Gilbert, who is clinical lead of Infection Prevention and Control at the Western Sydney Local Health Network.

Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne says it’s likely the Australian Government will be asked to contribute to a global effort led by the WHO against Zika.“A lot of the efforts will now be on countries like Australia to help South American countries to get on top of this.

“I think it would be very prudent, particularly considering that we are likely to see cases in Northern Queensland, it would be in Australia’s best interest to try and help on the ground where the concentration of cases are greatest.”

Public Health at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Public health a Sydney Uni is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Monday, November 9th, 2015

University of Sydney Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health subjects rank well

The University of Sydney was placed second in Australia and 33rd globally in the Times Higher Education subject rankings for Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health. This high rank is driven by strong performance in citations and research reputation.

Sydney Dental School

Study at the University of Sydney

This subject area encompasses the Sydney Medical School and includes significant contributions from the faculties of Science, Health Sciences, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing.

The university has consistently ranked within the top 50 universities globally in Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health in the Times Higher Education rankings since 2011.

The Times Higher Education made significant changes to their methodology this year, but the University of Sydney continues to remain securely within the top 50 institutions globally.

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Would you like more information about the programs offered at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Sydney research shows public appetite for healthier vending machines

Health conscious Australians are hungry for more nutritious options in fast food vending machines according to new research by the University of Sydney and University of Wollongong.

The study, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, reveals an appetite for healthy food options such as fresh fruit, vegetables, and yoghurt in vending machines in public places like hospitals and universities.

University of Sydney Public Health School

University of Sydney Prof Vicki Flood

Eighty seven percent of the 240 people surveyed thought the current range of vending machine snacks are “too unhealthy,” with 80 percent willing to pay the same or even extra dollars for healthier alternatives.

The lead researcher and accredited practising dietitian, Professor Vicki Flood from the University of Sydney, said vending machines are part of an unhealthy environment which is contributing to a rise in diabetes and obesity through the availability of energy-dense snacks and sugary drinks.

“We know that around one third of our daily calorie intake comes from snacking and with the busy lifestyles that we all lead, healthy eating often falls victim to convenience,” said Professor Flood.

“However this study shows that many Australians are becoming more aware of their diet and there is an opportunity to use vending machines to promote healthy snacking, particularly in busy environments like train stations and hospitals.”

The study was conducted in a university campus and public hospital in regional Australia, and surveyed the views of over 120 students and 120 hospital employees, patients and visitors.

The researchers also assessed the impact front-of-packet nutritional labelling had on purchase decisions, finding that more people chose the healthier food option when presented with nutritional values before purchase. The same impact was not seen in the drinks category.

A 2012 audit of vending machines in Sydney train stations by Professor Flood and colleagues at the University of Wollongong found few healthy snacks are on offer.

Only three percent of all vending machine slots were allocated to healthier choices like nuts, tuna or portion-controlled chips, and these options were generally more expensive.

Following a food preferences survey of 650 students earlier this year, the University of Sydney will be trialing more nutritious options in vending machines from Semester 2, 2015.

Ms Elly Howse from the Health Sydney University initiative said over 90 percent of students showed an interest in healthier food for lower cost.

“We are trialling better vending machine options in popular library and study spaces, as we know from our students that convenient food options are needed after-hours when campus food outlets are closed,” said Ms Howse.

“This is just one of the many initiatives we are undertaking at the University of Sydney, in collaboration with the University of Sydney Union, to give students more choice and opportunities to make better decisions for their health and well-being.”

Professor Flood said there are logistical challenges to improving vending machines but innovative businesses in Queensland and Melbourne have already recognised the market potential.

Public Health at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Public health a Sydney Uni is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: January 31, 2016 for the March 2016 intake

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

University of Sydney Public Health webinar

University of Sydney Public Health webinar on Wednesday, February 4

Professor Bob Cumming and Professor Tim Driscoll (Course Coordinators) will be hosting a Sydney Public Health School webinar to give prospective students the latest information about the Master of Public Health and Master of International Public Health.

University of Public Health School

Find out more about public health at Sydney Uni!

This is your chance to ask questions and get answers about

  • what’s new and different in these programs;
  • what you will learn;
  • how to plan your studies;
  • opportunities after you graduate;
  • and much more!

University of Sydney Public Health webinar details

Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2015
Time: 8:30 p.m. (Ontario); 5:30 p.m. (BC)
Register: Be sure to register before Tuesday, Feb. 3. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information and to register.

Public Health at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: January 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Sydney Master of Public Health

Public health aims to improve the health of populations through knowledge (collecting data to develop and test explanations and hypotheses), values (combining ethics with knowledge to assist in decision-making), action (making decisions to translate research into policy and practice and advocate for change) and outcomes (understanding research and practice to systematically evaluate public health programs).

University of Sydney Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Sydney

About Sydney Public Health School

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Students in the public health program at the University of Sydney will be exposed to public health values, decision-making, practice and policy throughout their studies.

Graduate opportunities

The Master of Public Health leads to hands on careers in public health, such as working with people in the field, as well as research-oriented jobs which involve conducting studies and examining overall health trends. Careers in public health include working as a public health officer in government health departments; health education/promotion officer; clinical research manager; health information manager or health project manager.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Widespread support for rapid HIV testing in dental surgeries

More than 80 per cent of oral health patients are willing to receive rapid HIV-testing in dental settings, which could help reduce the spread of the HIV according to a groundbreaking study revealed recently at a Sydney University HIV Testing Symposium.

Sydney Dental School

Dentists may soon be performing rapid HIV testing

The first of its kind study of 521 Sydney-based dental patients assessed patients’ willingness to undergo rapid HIV testing in dental settings, their preference for HIV testing-type type and their willingness to pay for the test.

Rapid HIV testing is a screening test that swiftly detects the presence of HIV antibodies in a person’s body by testing blood or oral fluids. It can be done as a simple finger prick or a saliva swab, and results can be made available within 20 minutes.

Rapid HIV testing is currently unavailable in dental settings anywhere in the world although the technology has been widely available for a decade. Australians will soon be able to access rapid HIV-testing themselves after the federal government last week announced that it had lifted restrictions preventing the manufacture and sale of oral home-testing kits.

“Dentists are well placed to offer rapid HIV testing because they’re located throughout the community, have ongoing relationships with their patients, and have the necessary training and expertise to recognise systemic diseases that have oral manifestations, such as HIV/AIDS,” says the study’s lead author, Dr Anthony Santella of the University of Sydney Medical School.

The new research finding has important policy implications, according to Dr Santella: “If rapid HIV testing was widely available in dental settings it could help to reduce the spread of the virus by informing people who aren’t aware that they are HIV-positive.

“It’s important that policymakers and other stakeholders consider expanding rapid HIV testing beyond medical and sexual health clinics because the average time from HIV infection to diagnosis in Australia is currently more than three years,” said the Sydney Medical School professor.

“As well, we have fresh evidence that around 45 per cent of dentists feel prepared and willing to perform rapid HIV-testing. This means it would be feasible to offer rapid HIV testing through dental settings, especially in targeted at risk communities.”

Among those saying they’d be willing to undergo rapid HIV testing in a dental setting, 76 per cent preferred an oral saliva swab, 15 per cent preferred a pin prick test, and eight per cent preferred a traditional blood test that draws blood through a needle.

Fast facts:

  • Sixty per cent of Australians see their dentist once in 12 months with 80 per cent seeing a dentist in the course of 2 years.
  • Ten to 20 per cent of people living with HIV are undiagnosed and therefore run the risk of spreading the virus unknowingly.
  • The Australian Government’s HIV Strategy aims to reduce the sexual transmission of HIV by 50 per cent by 2015, as a key step towards a 2020 elimination target.

Public Health at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Public health a the University of Sydney is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: January 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.