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Articles categorized as ‘University of Queensland Public Health School’

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Public health excellence in research awarded to UON and UQ

The CAPHIA 2015 Team Award for excellence in public health research was awarded jointly to the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland for their work on the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health.

This award was accepted at the 2015 Public Health Teaching and Learning Forum in Hobart by Professor Julie Byles, University of Newcastle and Professor Gita Mishra, University of Queensland.

University of Newcastle Public Health School

The award was given jointly to the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland for their work on the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

This award recognises the study as an exceptional public health resource that provides an evidence base for government and other decision-makers to formulate public health policy.

The latest report from the study was released in early September and examines chronic conditions, physical function and health care use across four different cohorts of Australian women.

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health is a long-term study of over 58,000 women which began in 1996. The four cohorts studied were aged 18–23, 45–50 and 70–75. In 2012/13 a new cohort of women aged 18–23 was introduced.

The study assesses the women’s physical and mental health, along with psychosocial aspects of health (including lifestyle factors and socio-demographic factors).

The CAPHIA 2015 Award for PhD excellence in public health was awarded to Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle.

Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier receives this award for the high quality of her thesis on An exploration of socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers’ responses to three tobacco control strategies.

The research, which has resulted in six published papers in international journals, was the first in Australia to examine the responses from highly socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers to several tobacco control policies (mass media, plain packs and pricing and tax).

The research highlights the ways current policies could be improved to increase their effectiveness among highly disadvantaged groups.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: November 1, 2015 for the February 2016 intake; however, it is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

UQ Public Health says stand up for your heart health

Stand up and be counted: That’s the message from a University of Queensland study that found more time standing could improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels while lowering fats in the blood.

Led by UQ School of Public Health’s Dr Genevieve Healy, the study found spending time stepping rather than sitting could have additional health benefits for the waistline.

UQ Public Health School

UQ study results show benefits of an active lifestyle

While the study couldn’t show that less time spent sitting improved health, Dr Healy said the associations it revealed were consistent with what was already known about the benefits of an active lifestyle.

“To get our results, we gave activity monitors to more than 780 men and women aged between 36 and 80,” she said.

”Participants wore the monitors for 24 hours a day for one week, and from this data we were able to accurately determine how long each participant spent sleeping, sitting or lying down, standing and stepping, which included walking and running.

”We also took blood samples and measured blood pressure, height, weight and waist circumference.”

An extra two hours a day spent standing rather than sitting was associated with approximately two per cent lower average fasting blood sugar levels and 11 per cent lower average triglycerides (fats in the blood).

“Extra standing time was also associated with higher average levels of the good type of cholesterol known as HDL, and replacing two hours a day of sitting time with stepping was associated with about an 11 per cent lower average BMI and a 7.5 cm smaller average waist circumference,” she said.

The study also found average blood sugar and triglyceride levels fell significantly for every two hours spent stepping rather than sitting.

“These findings provide important preliminary evidence that strategies to increase the amount of time spent standing or walking rather than sitting may benefit the heart and metabolism,” Dr Healy said.

“Get up for your heart health and move for your waistline.”

The research is published in the European Heart Journal, which also carries an editorial by the Mayo Clinic and Mayo College of Medicine’s Professor Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, who praised the UQ study.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: November 1, 2015 for the February 2016 intake; however, it is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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Wondering about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Public Health? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, July 31st, 2015

UQ School of Public Health studies Australia’s antibiotic overload

A pilot study led by researchers from the University of Queensland aims to reduce antibiotic resistance in Australia by decreasing the amount of antibiotics prescribed by general practitioners.

The study, Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention and Control Initiatives in General Practice, aims to decrease antibiotic-resistance across Australia.

UQ Public Health School

A pilot study led by researchers from the University of Queensland aims to reduce antibiotic resistance in Australia

Study co-author Professor Charles Gilks from the UQ School of Public Health is leading a team of researchers from UQ, Bond University and Queensland University of Technology.

Professor Gilks said most antibiotics were prescribed in a general practice setting, where they were the most common class of medicine prescribed; therefore, GPs were best placed to address the problem.

“Prescribers are well-placed to convey to patients that they are twice as likely to carry resistant bacteria after a course of antibiotics as someone who has not taken them,” Professor Gilks said.

“These resistant bacteria can persist for up to twelve months after antibiotic use, but with no further exposure to antibiotics they will disappear over time.”

The research team will trial a combination of evidence-based interventions that have each been shown to reduce antibiotic prescribing in the general practice setting, and will present a final report to the Department of Health on June 2016.

“In order to preserve one of medicine’s most precious and longstanding resources, GPs must reduce antibiotic use and only prescribe it where appropriate,” Professor Gilks said.

The UQ School of Public Health professor added that new antibiotics were not being developed at a pace that came anywhere close to meeting the impending urgent need.

Australia is one of the highest users of antibiotics per person in the developed world, with approximately 22 million prescriptions written every year in primary care.

Half of all antibiotics prescribed by GPs in Australia are for the management of respiratory conditions, but this treatment is often inappropriate as most respiratory infections are viral and resolve in the same amount of time whether or not an antibiotic is prescribed.

There is a strong link between antibiotic consumption and the rate of antibiotic resistance in patients. So the increase in antibiotic use increases the risk of death for patients who acquire antibiotic-resistant infections.

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Would you like more information about studying public health at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

UQ School of Public Health says ageing population in bad shape

Aging of the world’s population is leading to a substantial increase in the numbers of individuals suffering from chronic after-effects of diseases and injuries, according to a new study from the Global Burden of Disease Project that was co-authored by researchers from the UQ School of Public Health.

UQ Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Queensland

The study, Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013, is the first to examine the extent, pattern, and trends of non-fatal health loss across countries.

UQ School of Public Health’s Professor Harvey Whiteford and his Policy and Epidemiology Group at the Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research (QCMHR) co-authored the study and undertook modelling for all mental and substance use disorders.

“Mental and substance use disorders contribute 21.2 per cent of global disability and are the leading cause of disability followed by musculoskeletal disorders (when combined with fractures and soft tissue injuries) at 20.8 per cent,” Professor Whiteford said.

The study shows that people across Australia are living longer but spending more time in ill health with non-fatal diseases and injuries such as major depressive disorder and low back pain.

The study was published in The Lancet online on 7 June 2015.

UQ School of Public Health

The UQ School of Public Health’s postgraduate programs give health professionals the knowledge and skills they need to define, critically assess and resolve public health problems in a changing world.

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems.

Students can undertake this program in the following fields:

  • Standard
  • Indigenous Health
  • Nutrition
  • Health Promotion
  • Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drugs

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: November 30 for the February 2016 intake

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the UQ School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

UQ public health study finds type 1 diabetes more risky for women than men

Type 1 diabetes is much more deadly for women than men, a study of more than 200,000 people with the condition has found.

UQ School of Public Health research has shown that women with type 1 diabetes have a 40 per cent increased risk of death from any cause and that they have more than twice the risk of dying from heart disease compared with men with this type of diabetes.

UQ Public Health School

Learn more about the UQ public health program

Study leader Professor Rachel Huxley said the marked difference between the genders could change how women with type 1 diabetes were treated and managed.

“It is speculated that women with type 1 diabetes tend to have greater difficulties with insulin management and glycaemic control than men—factors that could contribute to their increased risk of heart disease,” Professor Huxley said. “However, more research is needed to determine why the disease poses a greater risk to women than men.”

Professor Huxley said the study findings were based on an analysis of data from 26 studies involving more than 200,000 men and women with type 1 diabetes.

“We already knew that people with type 1 diabetes have shorter life expectancies than the general population, but this study was able to determine for the first time that the risk of mortality is greater in women than men with the disease,” she said.

The UQ School of Public Health professor said the study also found that women with type 1 diabetes were at greater risk of strokes and were 44 per cent more likely to die from kidney disease than men.

“Interestingly, however, type 1 diabetes was not linked to an increased risk of death from cancers in either gender,” she said.

Type 1 diabetes is on the rise. Worldwide, the incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged 14 years and younger has increased by three per cent every year since 1989.

Australia has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world and its incidence is increasing. There are more than 120,000 Australians living with type 1 diabetes, and about 1825 Australians are diagnosed with the disease every year.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: May 31, 2015 for July 2015 intake; November 1, 2015 for the February 2016 intake; however, it is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

UQ School of Population Health: fruit a depression-buster for women

Women who eat fewer than two servings of fruit a day face a greater risk of developing depression, University of Queensland research shows.

UQ School of Population Health’s Professor Gita Mishra said the findings of a six-year study of more than 6,000 Australian women revealed a clear link between fruit consumption and the development of depressive symptoms.

UQ School of Population Health

Have you had your two servings today?

“We found that women who ate at least two servings of fruit a day were less likely to suffer from depression than women who ate fewer servings, even after taking into account other factors such as smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity, marital status and education,” Professor Mishra said.

“We also found that eating two or more servings of fruit a day protected women from developing depression in the future.”

Professor Mishra said researchers had not found a link between vegetable intake and depression.

“More research is needed on the different effects of fruit and vegetables, but this may be because fruit has higher levels of anti-inflammatory compounds and antioxidants, such as resveratrol, which is not found in vegetables.”

She said the findings highlighted the importance of a diet high in fruit to avoid the development of depression in middle age.

“Women experience depression at about twice the rate of men, and the rate of depression is growing rapidly.

“By 2030 it is expected to be one of the world’s top three diseases, making it a priority area for public health interventions.”

Researchers surveyed participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, an Australian Government-funded project that is one of the world’s largest and longest-running studies of women’s health and well-being.

The research is published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in a paper by Professor Mishra, UQ School of Population Health’s Professor Annette Dobson and the University of Sydney’s Dr Seema Mihrshahi.

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If you have any questions about the University of Queensland’s public health program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

UQ public health researcher acknowledged for taking a stand on poor health habits

A University of Queensland researcher taking a stand for office workers has been recognised for work that is influencing public health guidelines in Australia, the UK and the US.

Dr Genevieve Healy, from the UQ School of Population Health, won the Griffith University Discovery award category at the annual Research Australia Award ceremony in Sydney on Nov. 5.

UQ Public Health School

Sitting for long periods of time can have negative health effects according to UQ researcher Dr Genevieve Healy

Dr Healy has  developed the “breaks hypothesis,” which provides some of the first evidence that too much uninterrupted sitting increases risk factors for many chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

UQ School of Population Health Head Professor Charles Gilks said Dr Healy’s research had changed thinking about exercise among professionals across the globe.

“Dr Healy’s research has been hailed as ground-breaking and paradigm-shifting by the world’s leading exercise scientists,” Professor Gilks said.

“Her findings have influenced changes to the recommendations and guidelines regarding sitting in many countries including Australia, the UK and the US.

“The Australian physical activity guidelines now include specific recommendations to break up long periods of sitting as often as possible.”

Dr Healy said people should stand up at least every 30 minutes.

She is now researching just how much activity is needed to break up sitting time.

“We are keen to investigate whether just standing up regularly is enough or whether some walking needs to occur and at what intensity,” Dr Healy said.

“My team and I will also develop practical guidelines on how to get us all sitting less and moving more in real-world settings, particularly in sitting hot spots such as offices.”

Research Australia is an independent alliance of 160 members and supporters advocating for health and medical research in Australia.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years (depending on candidate’s background)

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Population Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Health Economics at the University of Queensland

Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens. Public health practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and by providing programs and services to address these needs.

University of Queensland Public Health School

Study at the University of Queensland, Brisbane

Health economics is an applied field of study that examines of the problems faced in promoting health for all. By applying economic theories of consumer, producer and social choice, health economics aims to understand the behavior of individuals, health care providers, public and private organizations, and governments in decision-making.

Health economics is used to evaluate how certain social problems, such as market failure and unjust allocation of resources, can impact on the health of our communities. Health economics can then be used to directly inform the government on the best course of action regarding regulation, national health packages, defining health insurance packages and other national health programs.

Master of Health Economics at the University of Queensland

This program provides graduate training in all aspects of health economics, meeting the clear need for comprehensive programs in Australia and internationally. A joint initiative of the UQ School of Economics and the UQ School of Population Health, this program is designed for people intending to work in the health sector. This program is accessible to those with undergraduate qualifications in economics or other disciplines. The program offers students the opportunity to develop strong analytical skills and is a qualification which may further career opportunities in national and international health agencies.

This highly specialised program provides critical insight into the complex economic issues in health sector administration, and the economic impacts of decisions. Students may take elective courses in analytical techniques, including advanced applied econometrics, public economics, health finance, epidemiology, business and economic decision techniques, burden of disease methods, benefit-cost analysis and health and economic development.

Program: Master of Health Economics
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: July and February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadlines: November 30 for February intake; May 31 for July intake

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree in any field with a GPA of at least 4.50 on a 7 point scale; or a Graduate Diploma in Health Economics with a GPA of at least 4.50 on a 7 point scale.

Career Opportunities

Graduates can expect to find employment as Health economics managers in pharmaceutical companies, health departments, private health facilities or government and development agencies.

UQ School of Economics

The UQ School of Economics offers an innovative range of programs from the Bachelor of Economics to UQ’s flagship honours program, a range of postgraduate coursework masters, some with a multidisciplinary focus and a world-class PhD. The school offers more than 60 courses, with study areas including business economics, economic history, econometrics, environmental and resource economics, financial markets, public finance, regulatory economics, labour economics, health economics, economics of professional sport, international trade and development, macroeconomics and microeconomics.

Through these courses students gain an in-depth understanding of the factors affecting economic performance, the business environment and the role and effectiveness of governments, while developing critical scientific skills including cost/benefit analysis, statistics and econometrics—all highly sought after by private and public sector employers. The UQ School of Economics consistently strives to improve these course offerings based on student feedback sought each semester.

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Would you like more information about the UQ School of Economics or the UQ School of Population Health? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady, who specializes in public health and business degrees at Australian universities.

Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 to find out how you can study in Australia!

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

UQ Public Health study shows lack of exercise adds to women’s healthcare costs

A lack of exercise is costing the Australian healthcare system $40 million a year for women alone, according to new research from the University of Queensland.

UQ Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Queensland

Researchers from the Centre for Research Excellence in Women’s Health in the 21st Century (CREWH21) at the UQ School of Population Health found that even a moderate increase in physical activity could reverse the costs.

Dr Geeske Peeters and colleagues used data from more than 6,000 middle-aged Australian women to investigate how long periods of sitting and too little activity were impacting on direct health care costs.

“We know that physical inactivity is associated with numerous physical and mental health conditions and accounts for up to three per cent of total direct health care costs,” Dr Peeters said.

Data from 2010 showed the median annual health care cost for inactive participants was $741 per year, versus just $689 per year for active participants.

Comparisons of participant data between 2001 and 2010 also showed the median cost of health care for inactive participants was $94 higher than that of highly active participants.

The UQ Public Health researcher said that while up to 15 per cent of Australian women aged between 45 and 65 were inactive, the data showed that their direct health costs could be reduced by increasing physical activity.

“If these women increased their activity levels, their reduced direct health care costs would translate to a saving of nearly forty million dollars a year in the country’s health care costs,” Dr Peeters said. “The cost savings could be even higher if women with the highest health care costs could improve their activity levels.”

She said findings were consistent among women of normal weight and those that were overweight or obese.

“We found that physical inactivity, rather than prolonged sitting or body weight, was the most important predictor of high health care costs for middle-aged women,” Dr Peeters said.

The study collected data from participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health and linked it with data from Medicare.

Participating women answered questions about time spent sitting, walking, and in moderate and vigorous leisure activities in surveys completed at three yearly intervals from 2001 to 2010.

Health-related costs averaged over the survey year were used to calculate annual costs.

The study was published in the March 2014 edition of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years (depending on candidate’s background)
Application deadline: May 31, 2014 for July 2014 intake; November 1, 2014 for the February 2015 intake

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Population Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

UQ Public Health researcher finds diabetic women face higher risk of stroke

A review of more than 60 studies has shown that women with type 2 diabetes have a 27 per cent higher risk of stroke than men with diabetes.

UQ Public Health School

Sunrise at the University of Queensland

Professor Rachel Huxley, from the University of Queensland, collaborated with researchers from leading public health units at the University of Cambridge (UK) and The George Institute for Global Health.

The UQ School of Population Health researcher said the study was the first to reveal that the risk of diabetes-related stroke significantly differs in women and men.

“Research has previously shown that diabetes confers a greater risk of having a heart attack in women than men, and now we have shown that this gender difference also extends to stroke,” Professor Huxley said. “Data was pooled from three-quarters of a million people, including more than 12,000 individuals who had suffered strokes, both fatal and non-fatal.

“Our analysis of the data showed, in comparison to men with diabetes, women with the condition had a 27 per cent higher relative risk of stroke even after taking into account other risk factors such as age and blood pressure.”

Diabetes is a global health concern, currently affecting an estimated 347 million people worldwide.

It is predicted to increase by more than fifty per cent over the next decade due to the prevalence of overweight, obese and physically inactive people.

“With diabetes on the rise, there is an urgent need to establish why the condition poses a greater cardiovascular health threat for women than men,” she said.

“We don’t yet understand why diabetes is more hazardous for women in determining their cardiovascular risk compared with men, but existing studies suggest that it may be linked to obesity.

“Men tend to become diabetic at lower levels of body mass index compared with women.

“Consequently, by the time women develop diabetes and begin receiving intervention from a GP, their levels of other cardiovascular risk factors—including BMI—are higher than in men with diabetes who may have been picked up and treated at an earlier stage of the condition.

“It may be this chronic exposure to high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in the lead up to developing diabetes that may be responsible for the greater risk of stroke that we see in women with diabetes than in similarly affected men,” said the UQ Public Health professor.

UQ School of Population Health

The UQ School of Population Health’s postgraduate programs in public health give health professionals the knowledge and skills they need to define, critically assess and resolve public health problems in a changing world.

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years (depending on candidate’s background)
Application deadline: The application deadline for UQ’s Master of Public Health program is May 15, 2014 for July 2014 intake.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the University of Queensland’s Master of Public Health program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.