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Articles categorized as ‘University of Newcastle Public Health School’

Friday, November 13th, 2015

Public health crusader honoured for excellence

The Hunter’s health and medical researchers found 80 reasons to celebrate as HMRI announced or acknowledged its community-funded grants and prizes during the 2015 Awards Night.

Following recent national grant success, a multitude of disease areas across the seven HMRI research programs received further support.

University of Newcastle Public Health School

Professor Julie Byles (Photo credit: University of Newcastle)

In the top award, long-serving public health leader Professor Julie Byles was honoured with the Award for Research Excellence, recognising her pioneering work in planning and service delivery for an ageing global population.

As a world-renowned and respected expert in gerontology and geriatrics, Professor Byles serves as Director of the University of Newcastle’s Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing and co-directs the HMRI Public Health research program.

She was instrumental in establishing the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health in 1995 and continues to lead it, as some of the original study participants advance into their nineties.

Throughout her career Professor Byles has secured $30 million in external grants and produced more than 230 research papers. Her advice is sought by the federal government and World Health Organisation to inform public health policies.

“Professor Byles’ research exemplifies both excellence and long-term commitment. She is a highly productive, passionate, generous and inspiring leader,” HMRI Director Professor Michael Nilsson said.

“Above all Professor Byles is making a significant difference for the social, psychological and health-care needs of older people in our region and beyond… her work is changing perceptions of ageing, not only in society but among the medical profession.”

Professor Nilsson also presented the second annual Director’s Award for Mid-Career Research to Professor Philip Morgan, Deputy Director of the University of Newcastle‘s Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition.

For Professor Morgan it adds to a list of 30 major research and teaching accolades that he has won since completing his PhD in 2003, including being co-recipient of the HMRI Early-Career Research award in 2009.

His major obesity prevention programs—SHED-IT; Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK); Workplace POWER and DADEE—have been delivered with unprecedented success. Global adaptations of HDHK are now underway in the UK and US as Western nations face an obesity epidemic.

Meanwhile, the PULSE-funded HMRI Award for Early Career Research went to Dr Susan Hua, an academic pharmacist working in targeted drug delivery using nanotechnology.

She is a leader in the field of therapeutic targeting, using advanced nano-pharmaceutical techniques, evaluating new drug delivery systems to assess potential clinical uses and novel mechanistic paths.

Dr Hua independently established her translational nano-pharmaceutics laboratory and research program, and has built strong collaborations with other major research groups interstate and internationally. Among her outcomes are a targeted drug delivery system for delivering therapeutics specifically to the uterus, along with new delivery models for drugs that target inflammatory cells in the gut.

HMRI Foundation Chairman Kyle Loades said the Awards Night again highlighted the Hunter community’s unwavering support for medical research through ongoing fundraising initiatives.

“So much is now being achieved by researchers in this new era of precision and personalised medicine, and we really thank the philanthropic community—the families, individuals and businesses who share their wealth to help create better health,” Mr Loades said.

“By allowing us to transform an idea into a new treatment or cure, it’s a powerful expression of faith in our researchers and the difference they can make for families now and into the future.”

Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, candidates are strongly encouraged to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have a bachelor degree in an approved health-related discipline; or other qualifications approved by the pro-vice-chancellor, Faculty of Health.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

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Find out more about studying public health at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Public health excellence in research awarded to UON and UQ

The CAPHIA 2015 Team Award for excellence in public health research was awarded jointly to the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland for their work on the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health.

This award was accepted at the 2015 Public Health Teaching and Learning Forum in Hobart by Professor Julie Byles, University of Newcastle and Professor Gita Mishra, University of Queensland.

University of Newcastle Public Health School

The award was given jointly to the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland for their work on the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

This award recognises the study as an exceptional public health resource that provides an evidence base for government and other decision-makers to formulate public health policy.

The latest report from the study was released in early September and examines chronic conditions, physical function and health care use across four different cohorts of Australian women.

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health is a long-term study of over 58,000 women which began in 1996. The four cohorts studied were aged 18–23, 45–50 and 70–75. In 2012/13 a new cohort of women aged 18–23 was introduced.

The study assesses the women’s physical and mental health, along with psychosocial aspects of health (including lifestyle factors and socio-demographic factors).

The CAPHIA 2015 Award for PhD excellence in public health was awarded to Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle.

Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier receives this award for the high quality of her thesis on An exploration of socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers’ responses to three tobacco control strategies.

The research, which has resulted in six published papers in international journals, was the first in Australia to examine the responses from highly socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers to several tobacco control policies (mass media, plain packs and pricing and tax).

The research highlights the ways current policies could be improved to increase their effectiveness among highly disadvantaged groups.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: November 1, 2015 for the February 2016 intake; however, it is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

Newcastle Public Health School receives award for excellence

A flagship course at the University of Newcastle has been recognised at the CAPHIA 2014 awards for Excellence and Innovation in Public Health Teaching.

The School of Medicine and Public Health coordinates and teaches 11 undergraduate public health courses to more than 1,350 students each year across three different campuses at UON with the aim of broadening the scope to include all undergraduate students.

University of Newcastle Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Newcastle

The team, comprising Drs Sue Outram, Marita Lynagh, Natalie Johnson, Conor Gilligan and Kate Dundas and Lorraine Paras received a unanimous Highly Commended from the selection panel in a very competitive field.

The Institute of Medicine in the US recommends that “all undergraduates should have access to education in public health” with the premise that we not only have an educated public health workforce, but also an educated population.

The flagship course, titled Introduction to Population Health and Health Promotion, has been taught since 2004 with the aim of developing leaders who are able to engage their communities and build healthy and sustainable societies.

This course is compulsory for students enrolled in health science degree programs, and is an elective for students from the faculties of Education and Arts, Engineering and Built Environment, Business and Law and Science and Information Technology; however, large numbers of students from Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary Education programs have also competed this course, or one of 10 other closely-related public health courses, as an elective.

The team aims to promote public health knowledge and skills across a diverse student body. These courses can involve controversial and sensitive issues such as inequality and disadvantage, which makes teaching a challenge.

The experience of the team has led to a web-based resource to increase the capacity and broaden the scope of the course.

These technological advances have increased the capacity of other academic staff and given them the confidence and ability to teach about these diverse issues.

Master of Public Health at the University of Newcastle Public Health School

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for program, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have a bachelor degree in an approved health-related discipline; or other qualifications approved by the pro-vice-chancellor, Faculty of Health.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

*

For more information about public health and international public health degrees, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Monday, July 21st, 2014

University of Newcastle research: Plain cigarette packs impact ‘taste’

Long-term smokers involved in a study published by University of Newcastle health researchers believed that the quality of their cigarettes had deteriorated following the implementation of plain packaging.

University of Newcastle Public School

Study public health at the University of Newcastle

Many could no longer differentiate between brands, saying that all cigarettes now tasted the same.

“It lends support to the plain packaging legislation and provides fuel for other countries to take up the policy,” co-author Associate Professor Billie Bonevski said of the HMRI-funded qualitative study that investigated the effectiveness of tobacco messaging among socio-economically disadvantaged smokers.

“It really shows the power of branding, which is why the tobacco industry fought so rigorously against the introduction of plain packs.”

Focus group discussions took place before and after plain packaging was enacted, with PhD candidate Ashleigh Guillaumier recruiting participants from five Hunter-based welfare organisations. Among the respondents were those with mental illness, drug and alcohol dependencies or those experiencing homelessness.

“These are the people with the highest smoking rates – 70 to 80 per cent as opposed to less than 20 per cent in general society,” Ms Guillaumier said. “It’s vital that any government anti-smoking initiatives work with these smokers.”

While plain packaging was considered a worthwhile initiative to discourage young people from adopting the habit, most of the existing smokers distanced themselves from graphic imagery. More effective were advertising campaigns depicting personal case studies.

“Many thought the health effects messages were exaggerated and not the direct result of smoking, which highlights the importance of addressing the misconceptions surrounding the impact of cigarettes,” Ms Guillaumier added.

“Personalised campaigns really struck a chord with our smoking groups, such as that of a 34-year-old smoker named Brian which showed the rapid deterioration of his health after being diagnosed with lung cancer.”

Researchers felt that many of the smokers surveyed would benefit from further promotion of cessation services such as Quitline as the majority had found quitting too difficult in the past.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have a bachelor degree in an approved health-related discipline; or other qualifications approved by the pro-vice-chancellor, Faculty of Health.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

*

Find out more about studying public health at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, March 28th, 2014

University of Newcastle studies alcohol consumption among university students

New research from the University of Newcastle shows that a web-based self-assessment and feedback program for university students who drink hazardously produced little reduction in consumption.

University of Newcastle Public Health School

Newcastle studies alcohol consumption

The intervention, a 10-minute interactive web program, was evaluated in a large randomized trial. The research, published recently in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association, was described by the journal editors as “the definitive study in the field.”

The study involved 14,991 students randomly selected from seven New Zealand universities. Over a third of the participants completed an alcohol screening test and 3,422 students who identified with hazardous or harmful drinking were randomized to the web intervention or the control group. The groups were followed up five months later to assess their drinking and related problems.

Students who received the intervention drank seven per cent less alcohol per drinking occasion but did not drink less often or less alcohol overall. In addition, intervention program participants did not have fewer academic problems than the control group participants.

Lead author Professor Kypros Kypri, from HMRI’s Public Health Program, says the findings were disappointing but consistent with what often happens when studies in single sites are scaled up to national implementation.

“Since the turn of the century, more than fifty trials of web-based interventions for alcohol problems in young people have been conducted. Some smaller studies, including our own, have shown promising results. This study was a large, national trial conducted under pragmatic conditions,” said Professor Kypri.

Evaluating the intervention at a variety of sites tested its robustness across student cultures, which vary in levels of drinking, exposure to alcohol outlets and promotion.

“Universities all over the world are grappling with alcohol-related problems because they have large concentrations of the heaviest drinking age group in the population.

“While drinking can be a positive aspect of student life, the negative effects universities need to deal with include assaults, property damage, sexually transmitted infection, and poor academic outcomes. In response, a lot of effort is being spent on developing interventions to reduce student hazardous drinking.

“Our results show that web-based programs cannot be relied upon alone to address these problems and should be used in conjunction with effective environmental interventions such as restriction in the physical availability and promotion of alcohol,” said Professor Kypri.

The project was funded by the Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand. Professor Kypri is funded with an Australian National Health & Medical Research Council Senior Fellowship. HMRI is a partnership between the University of Newcastle, Hunter New England Local Health District and the community.

Source: Kypri K, Vater T, Bowe S, Saunders J, Cunningham JA, Horton N, McCambridge J (2014). Web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention for university students: Randomised trial. JAMA, 26 March.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have a bachelor degree in an approved health-related discipline; or other qualifications approved by the pro-vice-chancellor, Faculty of Health.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

*

For more information about public health and international public health degrees, including the Master of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia and about public health programs at Australian universities.

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

University of Newcastle Public Health studies effects second-hand smoke

A study of cigarette smoke exposure in multi-unit housing by HMRI Public Health researcher Associate Professor Billie Bonevski has been instrumental in achieving proposed NSW Strata by-law reforms banning smoking in common areas.

University of Newcastle Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Newcastle

In a paper published in the international journal Preventive Medicine, Associate Professor Bonevski, from the University of Newcastle, drew extensive data from almost 161,000 participants in the NSW-wide “45 and Up” study.

Among this group, more than 12,000 people, including 8,000 non-smokers, were routinely exposed to smoke in their homes for eight hours or more per week—more than 7,000 were exposed for at least eight hours per day.

Multi-unit dwellers were 19 per cent more likely to be exposed than those living in houses, with women more likely to be exposed than men because they tend to spend more time at home.

Associate Professor Bonevski said the study resulted from an approach by the former ASH Australia health group seeking reliable data on second-hand smoke exposure.

“I was surprised by the number of people reporting exposure to second-hand smoke in their homes and workplaces because we tend to think of Australia as a mostly non-smoking society with a lot of existing restrictions on smoking in public places,” she said.

“It wasn’t surprising, however, that we found exposure was highest among those living in postcode areas classified as lower socio-economic status. In Australia the general population smoking rate is fifteen to eighteen per cent whereas among low-income earners, the unemployed and those with mental illness, for example, rates are fifty per cent and as high as ninety per cent.

“A lot of government-subsidized buildings are occupied by those from socially disadvantaged groups so the non-smoking residents are really at high risk of being exposed to toxic, carcinogenic nicotine drift.”

University of Newcastle Public Health School’s Associate Professor Bonevski said that previous international research had tracked how nicotine travels through buildings via elevator shafts, stairwells, air-conditioning systems and even under balcony doors.

Living in a smoky environment tended to increase take-up rates and make it harder for people to quit. Approximately 10,000 participants in the study had children residing with them in the unit.

“It’s the best feeling, as a researcher, to see the NSW Government respond,” Associate Professor Bonevski said. “The data is good, solid, conclusive evidence that second-hand smoking is a problem, and for those results to be taken up by policy makers is the reason we do what we do.”

The NSW Government is expected to introduce the by-laws in mid-2014.

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Find out more about studying public health at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information about how you can study in Australia and about public health programs at Australian universities.

Friday, January 10th, 2014

University of Newcastle researchers say sleep linked to diabetes

Getting less than six hours sleep each night (compared to seven hours) may increase type 2 diabetes risk by 30 per cent but has less impact on heart disease than previously thought, researchers from the University of Newcastle have found.

In the largest study of its kind, the team led by Hunter Medical Research Institute statistician Dr Elizabeth Holliday and epidemiologist Professor John Attia analyzed data from 240,000 people in the NSW “45 and Up Study” and tested for potential contributing factors such as existing illnesses and medications.

“A number of previous studies have looked at sleep deprivation and the risk of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease but the statistical power was relatively low and not all of them had corrected for potential confounders that can affect results,” Professor Attia said.

“Once we adjusted for the confounders the risk for heart disease went away, other than in those who had prior illness, but the relationship with type 2 diabetes remained significant no matter what we adjusted for.”

Of the 240,000-strong cohort, more than 7,000 people fell into the risk category of fewer than six hours’ sleep, with the findings just published in the international journal PLOS ONE.

Dr Holliday said it was surprising to see the cardiac link diminish.

“The relationship between short sleep and cardiovascular disease has been widely reported but results across various studies have been inconsistent. We were able to show that this relationship might be confounded by pre-existing illness, which we didn’t see with diabetes,” the University of Newcastle statistician said.

The researchers believe the results tie in with previous studies where volunteers became insulin resistant after several consecutive nights of acute sleep deprivation.

“There are other changes in hormones such as ghrelin and leptin that regulate hunger and the feeling of satisfaction after eating,” Dr Holliday added.

“When you’re sleep deprived you tend to crave carbohydrates and eat more sweets.”

Tips to improve sleep quality include exercising before 6 p.m., abstaining from caffeine in the afternoon and early evening, reducing stimulation from social media and texts, and observing regular bed and rising times.

“GPs should be interested in this result because there are a number of people with pre-diabetes who are at high risk,” Professor Attia said.

“Getting more sleep might be a way of improving insulin sensitivity and delaying the onset of frank diabetes. “It may also be a factor for people who are already diabetic and having trouble getting glucose control.”

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have a bachelor degree in an approved health-related discipline; or other qualifications approved by the pro-vice-chancellor, Faculty of Health.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

*

For more information about research, public health degrees, international public health degrees and epidemiology degrees, including Master of Public Health entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia and about public health programs at Australian universities.

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

Newcastle public health researchers question “manflu” myth

The Man Cold. The Man Flu. Because winter is fast approaching in Australia, most people are preparing for flu season. Men are popularly maligned for wilting like cheap supermarket flowers at the first winter sniffle; however, data from Australia’s online influenza-like illness surveillance system, raises questions about the “Manflu” myth.

An analysis of the 2012 weekly surveillance data of more than 16,000 flu website participants found that there was very little difference between the average duration of illness of men and women responding to the surveys.  Women took an average of 3 days off normal duties with cough and fever, whereas men took an average of 2.8 days off. Among those ill enough to visit an emergency department, women took an average of 4 days off, whereas men took 3.5 days off.

The Flutracking analysis team was split over the implications of the findings—mostly along gender lines. Men may have taken the same amount of time off as women but with less severe illness, or it may be that they really don’t wilt as easily as believed.  The decreased duration of illness among males with cough and fever visiting an emergency department could represent stoicism or perhaps that they were more likely to present to an emergency department with milder illness.

Where males and females do differ is in the timing of their illness throughout the influenza season.  Females tended to get ill earlier in the season than males and then again just after the peak of influenza activity in mid-July (winter in Australia).  This may be explained by females providing more care of ill family members.

Dr Craig Dalton, the director of the Flutracking system,  said there were many reasons why two people with the same viral infection might have different severity of disease including past immunity, genetics, and the dose of virus exposure. Dr Dalton is a Public Health Physician and a Conjoint Senior Lecturer in the University of Newcastle’s Faculty of Health, and is supported by the Hunter Medical Research Institute. HMRI is a partnership between the University of Newcastle, Hunter New England Health and the community.

The Flutracking system has been able to track the severity of influenza around the country since 2008.  It demonstrated that the 2009 pandemic influenza strain, while severe in some people, mostly led to low attack rates across the community.  The 2012 influenza season was a relatively moderate influenza season but the most severe since the 2009 pandemic.

Flutracking is a joint project of the University of Newcastle and Hunter New England Local Health District and is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aging.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have a bachelor degree in an approved health-related discipline; or other qualifications approved by the pro-vice-chancellor, Faculty of Health.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

*

For more information about public health degrees, international public health degrees and epidemiology degrees, including Master of Public Health entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools page.

Questions? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia and about public health programs at Australian universities.

Friday, April 26th, 2013

University of Newcastle wins international public health conference

More than 400 medical and public health education experts will flock to Newcastle in March 2015 for The Asian Medical Education Association (AMEA) Conference 2015 to be held at the University of Newcastle, the university is reporting today.

The University of Newcastle’s School of Medicine and Public Health won a bid for the prestigious international event that is expected to inject more than $1 million into the Newcastle economy, the university said.

The 2015 event will mark the first time the biennial conference has been held outside of Asia. Scheduled for March 31 to April 2, 2015, University of Newcastle said it will be attended by healthcare professionals and educators from around the world and will cover such topics as education leadership, education standards, innovation in education and challenges in clinical training.

The successful bid was led by the University of Newcastle’s Head of the School of Medicine and Public Health, Professor Ian Symonds, who worked alongside Business Events Sydney (the state’s convention bureau) and the Newcastle Convention Bureau to secure the conference, the university said.

“The University of Newcastle is ranked among the top three per cent of universities worldwide,” Symonds told Newcastle. “We have a reputation for delivering world-class innovation, with more than 40 fields of research undertaken at the university being rated at, above, or well above world standard.”

Business Events Sydney CEO Lyn Lewis-Smith told the university that the conference provides an excellent opportunity to showcase the expertise and innovation of the Public Health School and the University of Newcastle, as well as the appeal of NSW’s regions.

“The university is engaged in ground-breaking research in the fields of health and medicine and the AMEA conference is the perfect opportunity to showcase this on the world stage,” Lewis-Smith told Newcastle. “The conference will shine the spotlight not only on the university, but also on Newcastle and the vast array of venues, knowledge hubs and attractions the region has to offer.”

More about University of Newcastle Public Health School

The aim of the University of Newcastle’s Master of Public Health is to provide graduates with the skills required to improve population health through appropriate planning for the health needs of populations or specific at-risk groups; the assessment of social, behavioural and environmental determinants of health and illness; the development and implementation of effective and efficient approaches to health services and programs; and the appropriate evaluation and improvement of population health services and programs using appropriate research methods.

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You could be studying at the University of Newcastle when this conference happens! Find out more about studying public health at the University of Newcastleapply through OzTREKK today.

Monday, April 8th, 2013

University of Newcastle Public Health applications are open

Applications for the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle Public Health School is now open for the 2014 intake via OzTREKK!

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health. This includes clinicians and allied health professionals, health planners and managers, individuals working in health promotion, health protection or health surveillance.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have a bachelor degree in an approved health-related discipline; or other qualifications approved by the pro-vice-chancellor, Faculty of Health.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

*

For more information about public health degrees, international public health degrees and epidemiology degrees, including Master of Public Health entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools page.

If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady or Admissions Manager Beth McNally.

Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or Beth at beth@oztrekk.com; or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia and about public health programs at Australian universities.