+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Articles categorized as ‘University of Melbourne Public Health School’

Monday, June 26th, 2017

New hub for biomedical engineering research named after inventor of cochlear implant

A new institute that brings together biomedical engineers, clinical researchers and industry partners to develop real-world solutions for public health has been launched.

New hub for biomedical engineering research named after inventor of cochlear implant

Study at the University of Melbourne

Located in the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct, the Graeme Clark Institute for Biomedical Engineering (GCI) will be a hub for University of Melbourne researchers and industry partners to collaborate on developing new bionic devices, implants, drug treatments and assistive technologies like prosthetics, as well as diagnostics.

The institute is named after Professor Graeme Clark AC who invented the bionic ear along with his University of Melbourne colleagues, the first prototype multiple electrode implant device that successfully improved the ability of deaf people to understand speech.

The inaugural Director of the Graeme Clark Institute, Professor Mark Cook, says the Institute will link clinical and engineering fields in the pursuit of new solutions to public health.

“It’s fair to say that no biomedical engineering institutes, either in Australia or the wider world, have the scope and scale of the Graeme Clark Institute,” says Professor Cook.

“The Institute is in a unique position to capitalise on multi-partner collaborations that are critical to innovation and commercialisation. The novelty of the solutions we will develop comes through the direct interaction of the Melbourne School of Engineering, the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Science.”

GCI’s success will be measured in the impact of clinically driven research that solves clinical needs and engagement with industry to translate that research into clinical practice.

GCI researcher and Head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Melbourne School of Engineering, Professor David Grayden, says the university’s position as one of the top centres for biomedical engineering research in the world means it is well-placed to make significant contributions to the field.

“Projects will include modelling the human body in 3D to virtually assess and insert implants for joint replacements, testing the university’s world-first stentrode device in human trials, and building on its position as the top university for mechano-pharmacology, where tissues cells are mechanically measured to develop effective drug therapies,” adds Professor Grayden.

*

Discover more about studying engineering at the University of Melbourne! Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Closing the eye health gap may be in sight

Three years after the launch of the roadmap to close the gap for vision, progress has been made but “much remains to be done,” according to the authors of a Perspective published online recently by the Medical Journal of Australia.

University of Melbourne Public Health School

Study at the University of Melbourne

Dr Marian Abouzeid, Mitchell Anjou and Professor Hugh Taylor from the University of Melbourne said that progress has been made to increase services, improve efficiencies and support better Indigenous patient engagement with the eye care system.

Launched in 2012, the roadmap comprises 42 recommendations spanning a whole-of-system approach to eliminating disparities in Indigenous eye health.

The recommendations aim to

  • increase accessibility and uptake of eye care services by Indigenous Australians;
  • improve coordination between eye care providers, primary care and hospital services;
  • improve awareness of eye health among patients and clinicians; and
  • ensure culturally appropriate health services.

“Demonstrable gains are being made and there is growing momentum around the roadmap initiatives, but much remains to be done, and increased government support is required,” the authors said.

The authors stated that up to 94% of vision loss in Indigenous adults is avoidable or amenable to treatment.

“Vision loss accounts for 11% of the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, so it follows that fixing the eye care system to address avoidable vision loss will help to close the broader health and social gaps and will have flow-on effects well beyond eye health,” Professor Taylor said.

More engagement was needed from the public health and medical communities to drive progress.

The template used for eye care has high relevance for integrating care between primary health and essentially all visiting specialist services.

“With concerted multi-sectoral effort, political will and a commitment to establishing a sustainable eye care system, the gross disparities in eye health that exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians can be eliminated.”

Source: Medical Journal of Australia

*

Find out more about public health degrees available at theUniversity of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Wondering about the Melbourne MD? Contact Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson for more information: sarah@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

University of Melbourne studies effects of aspirin on bowel cancer

An international study led by the University of Melbourne has confirmed that long-term regular taking of aspirin or ibuprofen reduces the risk of bowel cancer by more than half for people with the genetic mutation causing Lynch syndrome.

University of Melbourne Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Melbourne

At least 1 in 1000 people in the population have the genetic mutation that causes Lynch syndrome. These people have a much higher rate of bowel cancer than the general population and about half would develop the disease without regular screening.

In a paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, University of Melbourne researchers and international collaborators, led by Dr Driss Ait Ouakrim and Dr Aung Ko Win from the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health confirmed that those with Lynch syndrome who took aspirin regularly were less likely to develop bowel cancer than Lynch syndrome patients who did not take aspirin.

The research team also uncovered a new finding that Lynch syndrome patients who took ibuprofen regularly, another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, were about 60% less likely to develop bowel cancer compared with those who did not take ibuprofen. This protection was seen in both men and women.

“The main risk reduction method for these people is to have regular colonoscopy screening. Almost nothing is known about if and how lifestyle factors and medications can modify their risk of bowel cancer,” Dr Win said.

“Our data is the first to confirm the finding of a previous international randomised clinical trial that found a protective effect of aspirin on bowel cancer for these high-risk people. Also, we were able to show the similar protective effect of ibuprofen such as Nurofen on bowel cancer for people with Lynch syndrome,” Dr Win said.

These findings are the result of a 15 year study of 1,858 people with Lynch syndrome recruited from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA. This is the largest study to date investigating the associations between aspirin, ibuprofen and bowel cancer risk for people with Lynch syndrome.

Further studies are being conducted to help determine the optimal dose, duration and timing of treatment.

About the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care.

The population health approach recognises that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow.

This broader notion of health recognises the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

The Melbourne Master of Public Health (MPH) teaches students to recognize and seek to understand the social determinants of health and disease, the molecular basis of disease in populations, and the influence of physical, social and cultural environments. Prime emphasis is placed on the prevention of disease and injury and the promotion of health and well-being.

Melbourne Master of Public Health Specializations

  • Epidemiology & Biostatistics
  • Gender and Women’s Health
  • Global Health
  • Health Economics & Economic Evaluation
  • Health Program Evaluation
  • Health Social Sciences
  • Indigenous Health
  • Sexual Health

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

*

Learn more about the Master of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Melbourne researchers plotting the elimination of dengue

Researchers at the University of Melbourne along with international collaborators are using a novel way to block the dengue virus in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes using the insect bacterium Wolbachia and have for the first time provided projections of its public health benefit.

University of Melbourne Public Health School

Melbourne researchers study how to block dengue fever with Wolbachia

Dengue is a viral infection spread between humans by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Dengue causes flu-like symptoms, including intense headaches and joint pains.

Published in the Journal of Science Translational Medicine, Professor Cameron Simmons, from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Melbourne and the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, said that the discovery could lead to improved strategies to reduce the incidence of dengue.

“We did a ‘real world’ experiment and allowed mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia and uninfected mosquitoes to feed on the blood of Vietnamese dengue patients. Our team then measured how efficiently Wolbachia blocked dengue virus infection of the mosquito body and saliva, which in turn steps stops them spreading the virus between humans,” Professor Simmons said.

Researchers developed a mathematical model of dengue virus transmission and used the experimental results as a basis to predict how well Wolbachia would reduce the intensity of dengue transmission under a variety of scenarios.

“We found that Wolbachia could eliminate dengue transmission in locations where the intensity of transmission is low or moderate. In high transmission settings, Wolbachia would also cause a significant reduction in transmission.

“Our findings are important because they provide realistic measures of the ability of Wolbachia to block transmission of the dengue virus and provide precise projections of its impact on dengue infections,” Professor Simmons said.

Wolbachia has been recently introduced into Cairns and Townsville and the results of this study suggest future dengue outbreaks in these cities should be much less severe than in the past.

“Our results will enable policy makers in dengue-affected countries to make informed decisions on Wolbachia when allocating scarce resources to dengue control,” Professor Simmons said.

Dengue continues to be a major public health problem in Asia and Latin America. Estimates suggest more than 100 million cases occur globally each year.

Public Health at the University of Melbourne

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care. The population health approach recognizes that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow. This broader notion of health recognizes the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February/March
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years (depending on background of candidate)
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

*

Learn more about the Master of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

University of Melbourne aims to improve public health training and education in India

Training in public health policy and leadership, improving disability programs and lessons from Australian in tobacco plain packaging policies are some of the collaborative projects in a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the University of Melbourne and the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI).

University of Melbourne Public Health School

Study public health at Melbourne Uni

University of Melbourne Deputy Provost and Deputy Vice Chancellor (International)  Professor Sue Elliott said the agreement was a great opportunity for sharing of expertise between the institutions.

“This agreement builds on a history of effective public health collaborations between the university, through the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health including the Nossal Institute for Global Health and the Public Health Foundation of India. We can expect further great things to come of this agreement as we consolidate and renew ideas for the future,” she said.

The Public Health Foundation of India is an independent institution that aims to strengthen training, research and policy development in the area of public health.

Professor Elliot and Professor KS Srinath Reddy, the President of PHFI, signed the MoU and outlined the way forward at a showcase event on Feb. 16 in New Delhi. The Deputy High Commissioner from the Australian Consulate Mr Bernard Philip, was a chief guest.

The MoU will facilitate new collaborative agreements around particular public health projects that were be showcased at the event. The event celebrated the existing collaborations and strengthen the links between leading Australian and Indian educational institutions.

Current collaborations covered under the MoU:

  • A three-year Australian Aid program to help train the public health workforce in leadership. This will feed into establishing a State Institute of Health and Family Welfare in Uttarakhand and a flagship course on public health leadership.
  • Measuring disability in India. This tool was developed by the University of Melbourne and is being trialled by PHFI and the Community Health and Global Network (CHGN) Uttarakhand Cluster in India. It is hoped that this tool will inform the development and evaluation of disability programs and policies in India.
  • Collaborative research, academic exchange visits, collaborative teaching and seminars and collaborative association in regional and global forums.
  • US National Institutes of Health Training Program involving faculty and trainees from PHFI, mainly the Centre for Chronic Disease Control (CCDC) to train researchers on global health.
  • Leveraging Australia’s experience to work towards plain packaging of tobacco products in India. This builds on a substantive three-year collaboration between experts in India and Australia.

Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care. The population health approach recognizes that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow. This broader notion of health recognizes the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February/March
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years (depending on background of candidate)
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

*

Learn more about the Master of Public Health at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Typhoid gene unravelled

People who carry a particular type of gene have natural resistance against typhoid fever according to new research published in Nature Genetics.

Lead researcher, Dr Sarah Dunstan from the Nossal Institute of Global Health at the University of Melbourne said the study is the first large-scale, unbiased search for human genes that affect a person’s risk of typhoid.

University of Melbourne Public Health School

Study at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

Enteric fever, or typhoid fever as it more commonly known, is a considerable health burden to lower-income countries.

This finding is important because this natural resistance represents one of the largest human gene effects on an infectious disease.

“We screened the human genome to look for genes associated with susceptibility to, or resistance from typhoid.,” Dr Dunstan said.

“We found that carrying a particular form of the HLA-DRB1 gene provides natural resistance against typhoid fever.  This gene codes for a receptor that is important in the immune response, by recognising proteins from invading bacteria.”

Typhoid is contracted, by consuming food or water contaminated with the bacteria, Salmonella Typhi or Paratyphi. It has been estimated that typhoid causes 200,000 deaths a year globally, and infects 26.9 million people per year.

“If we can understand this natural mechanism of disease resistance, then we can use this knowledge to help develop improved vaccines for typhoid fever, but also potentially for other invasive bacterial disease,”

Better treatments and vaccines are needed for typhoid fever as the infecting bacteria are getting increasingly more resistant to antibiotic treatment, and the current vaccine is only moderately effective and does not protect against paratyphoid fever, which is increasing within Asia.

This work was conducted in patients from Vietnam with findings then replicated in independent patient cohorts from Vietnam and Nepal

The research collaboration was between the Genome Institute of Singapore and Oxford University Clinical Research Units in Vietnam and Nepal.

About the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care.

The population health approach recognises that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow.

This broader notion of health recognises the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

The Melbourne Master of Public Health (MPH) teaches students to recognize and seek to understand the social determinants of health and disease, the molecular basis of disease in populations, and the influence of physical, social and cultural environments. Prime emphasis is placed on the prevention of disease and injury and the promotion of health and well-being.

Melbourne Master of Public Health Specializations

  • Epidemiology & Biostatistics
  • Gender and Women’s Health
  • Global Health
  • Health Economics & Economic Evaluation
  • Health Program Evaluation
  • Health Social Sciences
  • Indigenous Health
  • Sexual Health

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

*

Learn more about the Master of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

Melbourne global health and disease expert wins major award

Laureate Professor Alan Lopez, Director, Global Burden of Disease Group, University of Melbourne has received the prestigious Peter Wills Medal at The Research Australia Awards.

University of Melbourne Public Health School

Study population health at Melbourne

Now in its 12th year, the Research Australia Awards recognise individuals who have continuously contributed to, and advocated for, the health and medical research sector in Australia.

A global health and disease expert, Professor Lopez has a distinguished career as a researcher, author and as a generous collaborator who has greatly influenced debates about priority setting and resource allocation in health.

Professor Lopez is known for the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study, which he co-founded with Prof Christopher Murray in 1990. The GBD is an ongoing effort involving more than 1,000 collaborators worldwide to quantify the impact, and measure the comparative importance of over 300 diseases and injuries, and 67 risk factors worldwide.

These methods have been adopted by over 50 countries, including Australia.

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences Professor Stephen Smith said Professor Lopez is a highly cited author whose publications have received worldwide acclaim for their importance and influence in health and medical research.

“Professor Lopez’ scientific contributions have focused around strengthening the evidence base for health policy. His work has helped us understand the major causes of death and disability in populations and how they are changing,” said Professor Smith.

“He has been awarded major research grants in epidemiology, health services research and population health, including funding from the NHMRC, Wellcome Trust, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and AusAID, “ he said.

Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health 

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care. The population health approach recognizes that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow. This broader notion of health recognizes the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February/March
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years (depending on background of candidate)
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

*

Learn more about the Master of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, October 24th, 2014

Melbourne project looking at the oral health of children from migrant backgrounds

A project looking at the oral health of children from migrant backgrounds found there are many significant barriers for parents accessing mainstream dental services and oral health information.

Teeth Tales is a community-based child oral health project for Australian families from migrant backgrounds.

The families who benefited from this project had children under four years old, from Iraqi, Lebanese or Pakistani backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne.

Maryanne Tadic, Manager of the Population Health Unit for lead partner Merri Community Health Services said it is important to develop alternative options for children from migrant families who may have difficulty accessing information and services.

“We know from previous research conducted in Moreland and Hume from 2006 to 2009, that there are different traditions and beliefs about taking care of teeth,” she said.

Lead researcher, Associate Professor Lisa Gibbs from the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health said the aim of the project was to develop more accessible services promoting child oral health that can be reproduced in other culturally diverse local government areas in Australia.

“International research shows that people from migrant backgrounds are at risk of poor oral health. This raised concerns for the oral health of local children from refugee and migrant backgrounds,” she said.

More than 650 children from these communities received dental screenings. One hundred fifty-one families also attended a local oral health education course led by a trained leader from their cultural group. The course consisted of six hours of oral health education over two weeks, and a site visit to the local community health dental service the following week.

Ms Tadic said that working in partnership with established cultural organisations is critical to health promotion initiatives for families with migrant and refugee backgrounds.

The discussion of traditional oral health practices needs to be incorporated into oral health promotion initiatives.

“Study designs need to include the spread of cultural networks. ‘Teeth Tales’ findings are now directly informing Dental Health Services Victoria (DHSV) child oral health clinical guidelines,” Associate Professor Gibbs said.

Early results indicate the “Teeth Tales” intervention is promising in terms of increasing tooth brushing frequency and some measures of parental oral health knowledge.

University of Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care.

The population health approach recognizes that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow.

This broader notion of health recognizes the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February/March
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years (depending on background of candidate)
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Melbourne to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have an undergraduate degree in any discipline; or at least 200 points of tertiary study (equal to two full-time years of study) in any discipline and at least five years of documented relevant health-related experience.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

Find out more about public health degrees available at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

*

Dentistry at the University of Melbourne Dental School

Interested in dentistry? The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS), which incorporates all aspects related to the provision of advanced general dental care to patients as well as teaches students to prepare, develop, execute and write for publication a small research project.

This dentistry course commences with the introduction of specialized oral health subjects to allow students to enter the clinic as quickly as possible to maximize the experience in all aspects and phases of clinical treatment.

The final year of the dental course is comprised of one year-long subject in which the students will spend 40 weeks in clinical settings including the planned University of Melbourne private dental clinic, community health centres and rural community clinics which will include provision of oral health care to the aboriginal community. In addition, students will learn how to run a private dental practice based on a small-business model.

Would you like more information about the Melbourne DDS and about studying dentistry in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith to answer any questions you may have regarding dentistry school in Australia. Email Adam at adam@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, August 29th, 2014

An Hour with the Expert: University of Melbourne Facebook chat

Are you wondering what it’s like to study at one of the world’s most highly ranked universities?

The University of Melbourne will be hosting hour-long Facebook chats—An Hour with the Expert!

University of Melbourne

Learn more about the University of Melbourne

This is a great way to find out more about the following programs:

  • Speech Pathology – Monday, Sept. 1 @ 3:15 p.m.
  • Public Health – Tuesday, Sept. 2 @ 3:15 p.m.
  • Audiology – Monday, Sept. 8 @ 3:15 p.m.

Check out Time Zone Converter to find the time in your location.

Speech Pathology

Master of Speech Pathology program is designed to provide comprehensive training in all aspects of speech pathology and to produce graduates who are ready to enter the profession. The first year of the course provides the scientific background in anatomy and physiology, auditory and acoustic phonetics, linguistics, speech and language disorders, clinical practice and processes. The second year builds on the specialized knowledge acquired in first year, develops clinical skills and introduces students to research methods in the field.

Program: Master of Speech Pathology
Location: Parkville campus, Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: September 30, 2014

Audiology

Melbourne Audiology School’s audiology program focuses on developing professional skills through a large program component of comprehensive clinical training. Clinical skills are supplemented by coursework and lectures that introduce students to graduate-level research methods, while maintaining a strong level of scientific acumen expected of students in the health sciences at the University of Melbourne.

Program: Master of Clinical Audiology
Location: Parkville campus, Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: September 30, 2014

Public Health

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care. The population health approach recognizes that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow. This broader notion of health recognizes the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February/March
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years (depending on background of candidate)
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Melbourne to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

*

For more information about these Facebook chats and to register, visit http://bbiomed.unimelb.edu.au/nextsteps and look for your program of interest!

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Melbourne Public Health research finds ex-prisoners struggle to reintegrate into society

People with a history of mental disorder experience particularly poor outcomes following release from prison, a new Australian study has found.

In one of the largest and most comprehensive studies ever conducted, University of Melbourne researchers and interstate collaborators analysed the severity and complexity of the health-related needs of former prisoners.

University of Melbourne Public Health School

Melbourne studies how ex-prisoners can better reintegrate into society

Lead researcher Associate Professor Stuart Kinner from the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health said that people released from prison often struggle to reintegrate into society.

“Many ex-prisoners face unstable housing, unemployment, on-going mental health problems and relapse to injecting drug use or risky drinking,” he said. “We found that many of these poor outcomes were more common in ex-prisoners with a history of mental disorder.”

In the study, 1,324 adults imprisoned in Queensland were interviewed about their mental state and a range of health-related outcomes within six weeks of their expected release from prison, and then one, three and six months after they returned to the community.

“We wanted to find out how mental disorder affects health and social outcomes for people after their release from prison,” said Associate Professor Stuart Kinner, who worked alongside colleagues from Queensland and NSW.

Prisoners are characterised by a high burden of mental disorder and many also have a history of disadvantage including poor education, unemployment and substance misuse.

Despite this, very little is known about what happens to people after they leave prison and return to the community.

The findings, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, add to a growing body of evidence showing poor health and social outcomes for ex-prisoners.

According to Associate Professor Kinner, “This is not about prisoners. This is about vulnerable members of our community. Assisting people to transition from prison to the community, particularly those experiencing mental health problems, is in the best interests of everyone.”

About the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care.

The population health approach recognises that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow.

This broader notion of health recognises the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

The Melbourne Master of Public Health (MPH) teaches students to recognize and seek to understand the social determinants of health and disease, the molecular basis of disease in populations, and the influence of physical, social and cultural environments. Prime emphasis is placed on the prevention of disease and injury and the promotion of health and well-being.

Melbourne Master of Public Health Specializations

  • Epidemiology & Biostatistics
  • Gender and Women’s Health
  • Global Health
  • Health Economics & Economic Evaluation
  • Health Program Evaluation
  • Health Social Sciences
  • Indigenous Health
  • Sexual Health

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

*

Learn more about the Master of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!