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Articles categorized as ‘Monash University Public Health School’

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke

Melburnians are taking part in a world-first trial led by Monash University that could see a simple one-off vaccination protect against heart attack and stroke.

The trial, which started late last year, aims to determine whether the pneumococcal vaccine can reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke by up to 20 per cent. Observational studies indicate the injection can lead to a 17 per cent protection against cardiovascular disease, but this is the first large scale study to be conducted.

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke

Professor Andrew Tonkin and Dr Ingrid Hopper (Photo: Monash University)

The Australian Study for the Prevention through Immunisation of Cardiovascular Events (AUSPICE) trial is being coordinated by the Centre for Cardiovascular Research and Education in Therapeutics (CCRET) within the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SPHPM). The trial is led by Principal Investigator Professor Andrew Tonkin and assisted by Dr Ingrid Hopper and will be based at Caulfield Hospital.

AUSPICE is recruiting up to 3,000 men and women aged 55 to 60 years across six centres in Melbourne, Newcastle, Gosford, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth.

The study will formally test whether the existing pneumococcal vaccine can not only reduce invasive pneumococcal disease but also help to prevent heart attack and stroke. The pneumococcal vaccine protects against diseases such as meningitis and is currently free under the National Immunise Australia Program for people over 65, children and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and children.

According to Dr Hopper, if the trial proves to be successful it will signify a major change in preventative health practice globally.

“If shown to be effective, it would be relatively easy to incorporate changes into clinical practice because the pneumococcal vaccine is safe and has already been used in Australia for over 20 years in a different target group,” Dr Hopper said.

Victorian volunteers, aged 60–64, are asked to attend a single clinic at the Caulfield Clinical Trials Centre in Melbourne, for less than one hour. People with at least two risk factors for heart disease—high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or overweight/obesity—will be randomised to receive either the active vaccine or a saline placebo.

This collaboration between Monash University, the University of Newcastle, Australian National University, Flinders University and The University of Western Australia comprises a large multidisciplinary team including cardiologists, epidemiologists, neurologists, nurse immunisers, pharmacists, public health and medicine physicians and biostatisticians.

The researchers will link, via the Federal Department of Health hospital admission records, the incidence of cardiovascular disease requiring hospitalisation among those who received the vaccine and those who received the placebo.

Study Public Health at Monash University

The Master of Public Health at Monash is a 12-unit program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the university to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

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Study Medicine at Monash University

The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine at Monash University has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise to ensure that graduates are prepared for their future as a doctor.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the graduate Monash medical program

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Would you like more information about studying at the Monash University School of Public Health, contact Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

For more info about studying at Monash Medical School, please contact Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Monash University nursing and health sciences scholarships

The Monash Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences has established an international reputation for leadership in teaching, research and delivery of clinical and public health services. The faculty is one of the largest in Australia, delivering a variety of postgraduate programs in areas such as medicine, biomedical science, nursing, psychology, medical imaging and radiation sciences, forensic medicine, epidemiology and preventative medicine and social work.

Monash nursing and health sciences

Study nursing and health sciences at Monash University

The Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences offers a once-off $4000AUD scholarship for every international student enrolling in one of the following courses:

  • Master of Biomedical and Health Science
  • Bachelor of Nursing (Peninsula Campus only)
  • Master of Public Health
  • Master of Health Services Management
  • Master of Occupational and Environmental Health
  • Master of Social Work (Qualifying)

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Learn more about studying Health Sciences at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK for more information about these scholarships at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Monash University at the forefront of consumer rights in public health

World Consumer Rights Day (March 15) is an annual occasion for celebration and solidarity within the international consumer movement—a movement that is vital in public health and medicine. The theme for 2016 is antibiotic resistance.

Monash University’s Adjunct Associate Professor Ken Harvey has been involved in combating antibiotic resistance for over 30 years. He was a founding member, and at various times author, Chair of the Antibiotic Writing Group and Board Member of Therapeutic Guidelines Limited. Recognising that pharmaceutical promotion was also a driving force for inappropriate antibiotic use, he has also been a prolific campaigner for truth in drug advertising.

Monash University Public Health School

What’s the truth in drug advertising?

Dr Harvey is an organiser and speaker at a seminar on the Advertising of Therapeutic Goods and Services to be held at the University of Sydney on March 17, 2016; one of a series of events celebrating WCRD.

“The seminar will explore the number of current policy issues associated with the advertising of therapeutic goods and services in Australia that warrant debate,” Associate Professor Harvey said.

Associate Professor Harvey, from the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, has a long-standing research interest in medicinal drug policy and, more recently the promotion of complementary and alternative medicine.

“Few consumers understand that most complementary medicines (labelled AUST L) are not evaluated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration to see if they work. In addition, there are no effective sanctions for misleading promotion,” Associate Professor Harvey said.

He said that the escalating use of vitamins and supplements represents a triumph of marketing hype over science and that mandatory labelling of complementary medicines (‘this product has not been evaluated by Australian health authorities to see if it works’), as well as legislation for timely and meaningful sanctions for advertising violations should be introduced.

“There is also a need for increased and better targeted post-marketing surveillance and reporting by the Therapeutic Goods Administration,” Associate Professor Harvey said.

In addition, there is concern that some groups of health professionals have uncritically embraced diagnostic and therapeutic modalities that lack evidence and put consumers at risk.  At the forthcoming seminar, Associate Professor Harvey will present a case study of unlawful advertising claims made by chiropractic clinics and the belated response by the Chiropractic Board of Australia to address such claims.

The School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash has organised and supported the seminar together with the University of Sydney, the Foundation for Effective Markets and Governance, Choice (Australian Consumers’ Organisation) and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

Civil society organisations represented include the Consumers Health Forum, Friends of Science in Medicine, Australian Skeptics, Doctors Reform Society and Stop the Australian (Anti) Vaccination Network.

Monash University Public Health School

With diverse leadership, across four campuses, the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine is the faculty’s principal source of skills in epidemiology (including clinical epidemiology), biostatistics and large scale clinical data-management.  The school emphasizes expertise in large epidemiological studies, multicentre clinical trials, clinical registries, evidence synthesis and health social science.

The Master of Public Health a 12-unit public health program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Health specialisation streams are offered in

  • Clinical Research Methods
  • Health Economics
  • Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
  • Health Services Management
  • International Health
  • Occupational and Environmental Health
  • Research

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree. With an application, students should also submit a 250-word statement of purpose outlining their area of interest and the reason why they would like to complete the course, and an updated curriculum vitae/resume outlining relevant work experience.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

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For more information about studying at the Monash University School of Public Health, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at 1-866-698-7355 or adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, February 26th, 2016

Monash researchers conduct trial to determine if antibiotics may relieve low back pain caused by infection

It is estimated that four in five Australians will experience low back pain during their lifetime. Treatment options are limited, and low back pain remains the leading cause of disability worldwide.

Monash University Public Health School

Monash researchers to conduct trial to determine effectiveness of antibiotics on back pain (Image credit: Monash University)

Researchers from Monash University’s Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine in the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine are conducting a clinical trial to determine whether antibiotics are an effective treatment for low back pain.

This work has developed from their systematic review, which shows evidence of bacteria in the spines of people with low back pain and a clinical trial conducted in Denmark which reported promising results for antibiotic treatment.

The trial is premised on the hypothesis that some cases of low back pain may be caused by an infection in the spine. It is thought that after an injury to a spinal disc bacteria circulating in the bloodstream enter the disc and establish an infection which prevents healing and leads to ongoing pain.

The clinical trial team, comprising Monash University researchers Dr Donna Urquhart, Professor Flavia Cicuttini, Associate Professor Anita Wluka and Ms Molly Bond, is hopeful that the trial will provide valuable clinical data.

Dr Urquhart explained that low back pain is not just one condition, but that there are different types of low back pain. It is possible that one type of low back pain which results from infection may respond to antibiotic treatment.

“At present there is only preliminary evidence to suggest antibiotics might be effective so we need further research to understand whether they are beneficial for some cases of low back pain. While we hear that people are already trying antibiotic treatment for low back pain, it is too early for people to be requesting this treatment.

“It is also important for us to understand the effectiveness of antibiotics for low back pain given the problem of antibiotic resistance in the community” Dr Urquhart said.

The trial has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and is currently recruiting participants.

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For more information about studying at the Monash University Public Health School, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Monash University public health researchers suggest stroke prevention guideline outdated

Associate Professor Dr Anne Abbott, from the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SPHPM), has led a team of 16 experts in a systematic review of international stroke prevention guidelines and found that recommendations for surgical procedures to prevent stroke are outdated and over-utilised.

Dr Abbott’s findings, published this month in the American Heart Association journal Stroke, have significant implications for improved stroke prevention in all patients with narrowing of the main brain artery, known as carotid stenosis, as well as others at risk.

Monash University School of Public Health

Study public health at Monash University

“This research tells us that there is a great opportunity to improve best practice standards for stroke prevention for the benefit of many Australians and people overseas, as arterial disease continues to be the single leading cause of death and disability in westernised countries,” Dr Abbott said.

The study analysed 34 current guidelines from 23 regions in six languages and found that guidelines usually endorse carotid procedures (surgery and stenting) to remove narrowings of the internal carotid artery caused by fatty plaques, which are known as carotid stenosis.

“A major weakness of current Australian and international guidelines is that they over-encourage the use of costly carotid procedures which, for many patients, are currently more likely to harm than help.  These procedural recommendations are based on studies in which patients were recruited up to three and a half decades ago and overlook the particular hazards of carotid stenting.

“Current guidelines understate the value of modern medical treatment which has seen a drop in stroke rates of up to 80 per cent over the last 30 years,” Dr Abbott said.

“Carotid procedures target one artery, while medical treatment helps prevent strokes and all other arterial disease complications because it targets the whole body. Medical treatment encourages healthy lifestyle habits and appropriate medications to reduce risk associated with common conditions, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, inactivity, alcohol excess, illicit drugs, and diabetes,” Dr Abbott said.

The research, funded by an independent grant from the Bupa Health Foundation and facilitated by the Alfred Hospital, also uncovered significant organisational problems across guidelines. These problems included incomplete definitions and numerous fundamental inconsistencies and omissions.

“Updating health policy and practice by changing the focus of care away from surgery or stenting to non-invasive strategies will better prevent stroke and other complications of heart and arterial disease and this is important for public health and economically sustainable health services.”

About Monash University Public Health School

The Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SPHPH) is the second-largest school within the university’s Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences.

From health promotion to disease prevention, there is a growing international demand for public health professionals in both the government, non-profit and private sectors. Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens, and practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and providing programs and services to address these needs.

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Would you like more information about studying at the Monash University Public Health School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, September 1st, 2015

Monash public health alliance backs global approach to better health

Global health care research stands to gain from the innovative approach underpinned by the new Monash Warwick Health Care Improvement Alliance, which will draw on a AUD$5-million investment from both universities including AUD$3.7 million from the Monash Warwick Alliance.

The new health care alliance brings together the medical and business schools of Monash University and the University of Warwick with the aim of improving health care through collaborative and innovative approaches to research and subsequent clinical practice.

Monash Public Health School

Innovative approach to health care research with Monash Warwick Health Care Improvement Alliance (Photo credit: Monash University)

With a team headed by Professors John McNeil, Helena Teede and Ian McLoughlin from Monash University and Professors Graeme Currie and Richard Lilford from University of Warwick, the research will focus on improving practices and policies in Australia and the UK at both local and international levels.

In these and other comparable nations, core policy objectives are patient health care experience and quality of life; quality of health care; and the accessibility, equity and sustainable affordability of health care.

Professor McNeil, head of the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, said the challenges facing health care systems could not be tackled by a single discipline or institution.

Collaboration therefore provided a powerful opportunity to make change on a global scale.

“By supporting the development of health care improvement science as a core research and educational activity, the two universities will generate new knowledge and understanding that will impact on changes to health care policy and practices in Australia, the UK and globally,” Professor McNeil said.

The health care alliance incorporates Monash University’s School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, the Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, the Faculty of Business and Economics and Monash Business School, along with the University of Warwick’s School of Business and School of Medicine.

Collaborative research opportunities will also be provided through the NIHR (UK National Institute for Health Research) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research & Care for West Midlands (CLAHRC-WM), a five-year initiative to create lasting and effective collaborations across health and social care organisations, universities and local authorities to improve services for patients, involving Professors Currie and Lilford.

Formed in early 2012, the Monash Warwick Alliance represents an innovation in higher education and research and aims to accelerate the exchange of people, ideas and information between Monash University and the University of Warwick.

Monash University Master of Public Health

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged by Monash University to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree. With an application, students should also submit a 250-word statement of purpose outlining their area of interest and the reason why they would like to complete the course, and an updated curriculum vitae/resume outlining relevant work experience.

Apply to Monash Public Health School!

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For more information about studying public health at Monash University, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

Preparing for a public health emergency

Researchers have published a set of key insights that could help countries prepare for an influenza pandemic.

In a supplement to the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers—including Monash University Associate Professor Manoj Gambhir—produced a series of modelling papers describing how public health workers can prepare for a potential pandemic.

Monash Public Health School

Study public health at Monash (photo credit: Monash University)

Associate Professor Gambhir, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, said the work was very timely given the current large outbreak of avian influenza among birds in the US.

The modelling research, conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and published this month, was initiated during the March 2013 detection of H7N9 avian influenza virus – bird flu – in China, and also draws insight from the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

Associate Professor Gambhir, who worked with CDC colleagues on CDC’s H7N9 response, said the modelling served as a roadmap for practically preparing for an influenza pandemic when data were scarce but clear thinking and risk management were needed.

“With limited data available to the CDC to plan and prepare for a potential pandemic, the agency turned to mathematical modellers to help them answer questions,” said Associate Professor Gambhir.

“These questions included what the potential impact would be if the virus became transmissible between humans, should a vaccine be developed, and what was the likely impact of interventions,” he said.

The supplement includes eight papers that were written to inform planning and help provide answers to these various questions and disseminate what the CDC found.

Associate Professor Gambhir worked on three of the papers which involved looking at standardising scenarios to respond to a pandemic, modelling methods, and effects of a vaccine program.

“We found that the computer modelling was very informative about the trade-offs that should be considered when determining what quantity of a resource, like vaccine or personal protective equipment, would be required as well as when and for how longit would be needed,” said the Monash University professor.

“Making clear assumptions about the possible ways in which a pandemic might unfold, and playing them forward in a computer simulation, was shown to be immensely powerful for the preparedness of a nation to such an emergency.

“The supplement offers a wealth of analytical insight and guidance for public health workers preparing for an influenza pandemic.”

Associate Professor Gambhir said the collection of articles can serve as an important guide to help countries prepare for a pandemic when limited data are available.

About Monash University Public Health School

Monash University’s School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SPHPH) is the second-largest school within the university’s Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences.

From health promotion to disease prevention, there is a growing international demand for public health professionals in both the government, non-profit and private sectors. Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens, and practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and providing programs and services to address these needs.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by Monash University to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

To be eligible to apply, you must hold an undergraduate degree in any discipline. Please also submit a resume and 250-word personal statement outlining your reasons for wanting to undertake this program, and your areas of interest.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

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Would you like more information about studying at the Monash University Public Health School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Monash University Public Health School

With diverse leadership, across four campuses, the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine is the faculty’s principal source of skills in epidemiology (including clinical epidemiology), biostatistics and large scale clinical data-management.

The school emphasizes expertise in large epidemiological studies, multicentre clinical trials, clinical registries, evidence synthesis and health social science. Continued collaborative work with the major Monash-affiliated hospitals, research institutes and public health units within Victoria, ensures the school provides a key resource underpinning translational research within the faculty.

The Master of Public Health a 12-unit public health program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Study public health at Monash

Monash University Master of Public Health

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged by Monash University to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree. With an application, students should also submit a 250-word statement of purpose outlining their area of interest and the reason why they would like to complete the course, and an updated curriculum vitae/resume outlining relevant work experience.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

*

For more information about studying at the Monash University School of Public Health, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Monash Public Health to conduct long-term study of the health of Morwell residents

Monash University has been contracted by the Victorian Department of Health to undertake a comprehensive study of the long-term health of Morwell residents following exposure to the smoke from the Hazelwood coal mine fire.

On Feb. 9 this year the Hazelwood open-cut brown coal mine in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, caught fire resulting in the nearby town of Morwell being covered in plumes of smoke and ash over a period of six weeks.

Monash University Public Health School

Study public health at Monash University

The study will pay particular attention to susceptible sub-groups, such as pregnant women, infants and children, the elderly, and those with pre-existing lung and heart disease.

Lead researcher Professor Michael Abramson, from the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, said there are no published health studies done specifically in relation to exposure to smoke from fires in open cut brown coal mines.

“The study will provide information on the potential health effects including respiratory and cardiovascular conditions, cancer, causes of death, child development and psychological outcomes as well as broader community health outcomes. It will also provide evidence on which to base health advice in future events,” Professor Abramson said.

The study will bring together researchers from across Monash University, Federation University, the University of Tasmania, CSIRO and the University of Adelaide. An important feature of the study will be the strong local base, with the Monash School of Rural Health, which has several sites in the region, playing a lead role. This local connection will be reinforced through collaboration with researchers from the Federation University Gippsland campus.

The project will involve the development of an advisory committee with representation from local community members as well as close connections with local health professionals to ensure the study outcomes are communicated locally and taken up into policy and practice.

Head of the Monash School of Rural Health Professor Judi Walker said, “This study is focused on the health impacts on the local community and while funded for an initial 10 year period, is expected to continue for twenty years or more to enable the detection of longer-term outcomes. Such a major undertaking can only be done in close collaboration with the community.”

Monash University Public Health School

With diverse leadership, across four campuses, the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine is the faculty’s principal source of skills in epidemiology (including clinical epidemiology), biostatistics and large scale clinical data-management.  The school emphasizes expertise in large epidemiological studies, multicentre clinical trials, clinical registries, evidence synthesis and health social science. Continued collaborative work with the major Monash-affiliated hospitals, research institutes and public health units within Victoria, ensures the school provides a key resource underpinning translational research within the faculty.

The Master of Public Health a 12-unit public health program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged by Monash University to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree. With an application, students should also submit a 250-word statement of purpose outlining their area of interest and the reason why they would like to complete the course, and an updated curriculum vitae/resume outlining relevant work experience.

Apply to Monash University Public Health School!

*

For more information about studying at the Monash University School of Public Health, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

Monash medicine delegates head to Berlin

Delegates from Monash University will join world leaders in addressing major global health priorities at the 2014 World Health Summit in October. Climate change and health are the top issues to be discussed at this year’s summit, which will be held Oct. 19 – 22 in Berlin.

Monash University

Learn more about Monash University

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Professor Christina Mitchell is leading the university’s delegation at the conference.

“The summit is an important forum that enables public health leaders the opportunity to address the greatest health issues facing our world,” Professor Mitchell said.

Throughout the summit, Monash University will host symposia covering a range of topics from demographic change, systems biology and medical education.

The World Health Summit is the annual conference of the M8 Alliance of Academic Health Centers, universities and national academies, organised in collaboration with the National Academies of Sciences of more than 67 countries through the InterAcademy Medical Panel (IAMP).

The summit’s mission is to bring together researchers, physicians, leading government officials and representatives from industry as well as from non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and health care systems worldwide to address the most pressing issues facing medicine and health care systems over the next decade and beyond.

It is one of the world’s foremost gatherings of public health leaders from academia, politics, industry and government.

Popular Schools at Monash University for Canadians

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Would you like more information about studying at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!