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Articles categorized as ‘James Cook University Physiotherapy School’

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Australian Physiotherapy School applications are open!

Are you interested in becoming a certified physiotherapist? Great news! Applications for Australian Physiotherapy Schools are now open for the 2015–16 intakes via OzTREKK!

Australian Physiotherapy Schools in Australia

Study physiotherapy in Australia!

Six of OzTREKK’s Australian universities offer a graduate-entry physiotherapy program. These degrees are labelled as Master of Physiotherapy Studies or Doctor of Physiotherapy degrees, but both are professional qualification programs.

The application process to any of the physiotherapy schools listed is streamlined and made stress-free for you by OzTREKK. All applications are submitted directly to the OzTREKK Application and Information Centre in Ontario, Canada.

Do you have an undergraduate degree? Consider applying to one of these graduate-entry physio programs:

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or phone toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

All about physiotherapy degrees in Australia

Are you interested in studying physiotherapy in Australia? Australian university graduate-entry physio degrees are highly sought after by Canadian university graduates with academic backgrounds in kinesiology, health sciences, and human kinetics. Australia is world-renowned for its leading-edge physiotherapy research and practice, and Canadians enjoy learning from Australian academics who are world leaders in the physiotherapy field.

Australian physiotherapy schools in Australia

Inside Bond University Physiotherapy School

Six of OzTREKK’s Australian universities offer a graduate-entry physiotherapy program. These degrees are labelled as Master of Physiotherapy Studies or Doctor of Physiotherapy degrees, but both are professional qualification programs. In order to help you make the best decision, here are just some of the most common questions (with answers!) we receive.

What is the difference between the Master of Physiotherapy and the Doctor of Physiotherapy?

Both the Master of Physiotherapy (MPT) and Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT) programs are designed to provide the same professional qualifications, so graduates of each program will be returning to Canada and applying for the same type of certification.

The DPT programs, due to their longer length, provide students with more practicum and coursework components, which some students like. Additionally, by having this extra time, students are usually able to delve a bit deeper into the profession of physiotherapy and explore some topics the shorter programs may not, such as emergency medicine or sports physiotherapy.

When returning to Canada, which organizations are responsible for evaluating the degree?

Graduates who wish to become certified as a physiotherapist here in Canada will need to apply for certification through Canada’s provincial certification boards. In many cases these provincial certification boards will require applicants to also complete the certification process through Canada’s national physiotherapy regulatory board, the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (Alliance).

As an international graduate, you would first have your Australian university qualifications assessed by the Alliance to ensure these meet their requirements. If they meet the requirements, you would then complete the Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE), just like any other applicant.

The Alliance and provincial certification boards only assess applicants on a case-by-case basis and do not pre-approve any international physiotherapy programs. Based on this assessment process and the fact that applicants have to pass the PCE, it is not guaranteed that all applicants will have a successful application; however, at OzTREKK, we keep track of how our Australian university programs compare to Canadian requirements, and do not promote physiotherapy degrees in Australia if we didn’t feel they would work for our Canadian students.

What is the Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE)?

The Physiotherapy Competency Examination tests whether qualified exam candidates have demonstrated a minimum standard of practice. The PCE ensures that members of the public will be safe when they interact with physiotherapists. It fairly and accurately evaluates the competencies you need to have to practice physiotherapy. Most physiotherapy regulators in Canada include passing the PCE as part of their entry-to-practice process.

What does the PCE involve?

There are two components to the examination: a written component, and a clinical component. The written component tests your ability to use and integrate clinical knowledge and to solve clinical problems using clinical scenarios. You must achieve a minimum overall score to pass the Written Component.

The Clinical Component tests safe, effective use of the principles and processes of physiotherapy practice. The knowledge, skills and abilities assessed by the Clinical Component include communication skills and professional behaviour.

Australian Physiotherapy Schools

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Want to learn more about physiotherapy schools in Australia? Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about physiotherapy programs at Australian universities. Email OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or call toll free 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Visiting health sciences researcher at JCU studies what gets the heart going

How a single bout of exercise affects cardiovascular function is being examined by a visiting researcher at James Cook University in Townsville.

Hayleigh Raiff, a student from the University of Dayton in Ohio in the United States, is researching the acute effects of exercise on cardiovascular function.

Ms Raiff is working with staff from JCU’s Institute of Sport and Exercise Science (ISES) and Vascular Biology Unit, and members of the National Health and Medical Research Council-funded National Centre for Research Excellence to improve the management of Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD).

The study, The acute effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on cardiovascular function and arterial stiffness, is a pilot study that aims to guide future research into improving the exercise prescription of patients with a type of PAD – abdominal aortic aneurysm.

“The goal of the research is to study the effect of a single exercise bout on vascular function,” Ms Raiff said.

“While the cumulative effects of aerobic and resistance training have been shown in previous studies, this study hopes to examine the changes observed after a single session and identification of the mechanism for these changes over time.”

Ms Raiff said the research was being conducted in the ISES Exercise Testing and Prescription Laboratory at JCU under the supervision of Associate Professor Anthony Leicht from JCU’s ISES.

“The research involves having participants complete three sessions with each consisting of twenty minutes of rest, thirty minutes of exercise, and  sixty minutes of recovery,” she said.

The Ohio-based researcher added that the three exercise sessions involve aerobic, resistance and no exercise with the three sessions undertaken in a randomized order with at least 48 hours separating each session. “Before each exercise, measures of vascular function including arterial stiffness, central aortic pressure and peripheral blood pressure are taken with blood samples also collected for analysis of biomarkers of vascular function.”

During each of the exercise sessions, heart rate, blood pressure and rating of effort are recorded every 1–5 minutes.

Following exercise, another blood sample is taken in order to examine the biomarker change during the exercise and measure of arterial stiffness, central aortic pressure and peripheral blood pressure are recorded at regular intervals.

Ms Raiff said her journey to JCU had been unconventional.

“While most students work with a study abroad department, I was fortunate enough to be put directly in contact with Associate Professor Anthony Leicht of JCU’s Institute of Sport and Exercise Science,” she said.

“During the summer of 2012, I contacted my advisor at the University of Dayton to express my interest in spending the next summer in Australia because of my interest in physiotherapy. I was also hoping to get some clinical experience and hoped he would be able to give me some guidance and inform me of some opportunities.”

In a coincidence, her supervisor informed her Associate Professor Leicht had just stopped by his office at the University of Dayton the previous week and encouraged her to contact him about the experience she was looking for.

Ms Raiff said she would use the findings of the study to compose her honours thesis as a part of her Honours with Distinction curriculum at the University of Dayton.

“I am excited to take all that I have learned here at JCU back with me to UD and hopefully contribute to my department’s understanding of vascular physiology.”

Sport and Exercise Science/Exercise Physiology (Clinical)

Sport and Exercise Science Do you want to

  • make a useful contribution to the community?
  • further your interest and abilities in sport and exercise science?
  • help people to improve their life opportunities and sense of physical well-being?
  • work with people?
  • work with a wide range of age groups with varying physical exercise and sport abilities?
  • work with community based and/or professional sporting persons/clubs/teams?
Exercise Physiology (Clinical) Do you want to

  • make a useful contribution to the community?
  • help people to improve their life opportunities and sense of physical well-being?
  • work with people?
  • work with a wide range of age groups with varying occupational, exercise and physical abilities?
  • work with other allied health professionals
  • work with people to manage chronic diseases/conditions and injury rehabilitation

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Find out more about James Cook University Physiotherapy School and JCU health sciences programs. Contact OzTREKK’s Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tiltson at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information about studying health sciences and physiotherapy at an Australian university!

 

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

JCU physiotherapy professor explains how to get a good night’s sleep

A great night’s sleep is something most people cherish, but many of us aren’t getting our share, especially university students. Course workloads, part-time jobs, and exam stress all play a role in how the body is able to relax at night. Physiotherapists are continually researching and studying how people sleep, and they see all too often the effects of poor sleep posture.

Dr Steven Park, the author of Sleep, Interrupted, says poor sleeping posture can aggravate fatigue, sleep apnea, headaches, heartburn and back pain, among other things.

“The position you adopt can have an effect,” says an associate professor of physiotherapy at James Cook University, Sue Gordon.

Medical conditions, particularly respiratory illnesses, can restrict your choices, but the most important thing, the physiotherapy professor says, is fairly straightforward: Find a position that’s comfortable. What suits you, however, won’t suit everyone, and there is no ideal sleep position.

While some people change positions up to 45 times during the night, improving our primary position can affect the quality of our sleep as well as how we feel when we wake.

Back

Sleeping on your back is good for the neck and keeps the spine in a relatively neutral position; however, it can aggravate respiratory disorders, reflux and sleep apnea, JCU Physiotherapy Professor Gordon says.

Stomach

While stomach sleeping is the absolute worst position for the neck, some sleep experts say it lessens the chances of snoring.

Only about 5 percent of people, mostly women, sleep on their stomach. As people get older, they struggle to sleep on their stomach because the neck is in full flexion and the spine is less able to cope. To take the strain off the neck, it is suggested that you place a pillow lengthwise down your belly so you’re only about three-quarters rolled over.

JCU Physiotherapy Professor Gordon also adds that people who sleep on their stomachs are more likely to have repeated sleep disruptions.

Side

Most people (about 72 percent) sleep on their sides. Some studies suggest that sleeping on your left side can reduce reflux. Additionally, Ms Gordon says, “there is some evidence that side-sleepers get a better night’s sleep.”

Comfortable pillows are important for side-sleepers.  Don’t use pillows that are too high or  too low as this leads to scrunching on one side of the neck and stretched nerves on the other. This can lead to dead or tingly arms upon waking and shoulder pain that can last throughout the day, or possible chronic pain.

Try using two pillows: a flatter one for the bottom, and then a softer one to fill in the gap between the flat pillow and your neck.

About Physiotherapy Schools in Australia

Another common name for physiotherapy is physical therapy. Australia is world-renowned for its leading-edge physiotherapy research and practice, and Canadians enjoy learning from Australian academics who are world leaders in the physiotherapy field. At Australian universities, physiotherapy is a strong academic and clinical discipline, and Australian research in physiotherapy drives teaching and learning. This provides Australia’s physiotherapy students with opportunities to be educated in contemporary, evidence-based clinical practice.

Bachelor of Physiotherapy Programs

Four of OzTREKK‘s universities offer a four-year Bachelor of Physiotherapy degree. For the Bachelor of Physiotherapy programs offered at Australian universities, credit for previous studies may be awarded for introductory science subjects, such as anatomy, physiology or biology. However, due to the structure of the physiotherapy programs and the fact that credit can be awarded for only a few year-one subjects, students with another bachelor’s degree normally do take four years to complete a Bachelor of Physiotherapy. The following Australian universities offer undergraduate physiotherapy programs:

Master of Physiotherapy or Doctor of Physiotherapy Programs

Five of OzTREKK‘s Australian universities offer a graduate-entry physiotherapy program. These degrees are labelled as Master of Physiotherapy Studies or Doctor of Physiotherapy degrees, but both are professional qualification programs. The following Australian universities offer graduate physiotherapy programs:

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Want to learn more about studying at Physiotherapy Schools in Australia? Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about physiotherapy programs at Australian universities.

Email OzTREKK Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com, or call toll free 1 866-698-7355.