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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Physiotherapy Schools’

Tuesday, March 12th, 2019

OzTREKK Ambassadors: Moving to Brisbane

“Housing” the big move

I think I can speak not only for myself, but the vast majority of others when I say that your home should be your own personal oasis. A place where you can come home from a long day of studying/working and be able to sit back and relax. With that being said, as a student your home should also be close to bus stops, places to eat and entertainment.

The first thing you should do (while in Canada) is try to find an Airbnb or a place that would be cheap for the first couple weeks when you arrive.  I was lucky and had a friends’ parents put me up for three weeks before I could actually get my lease to my condo.

Once you are in Brisbane, you can actually see the houses/condos in person and get a better feel for what is around them as well.  This is the best way to find a good place to live.  Accommodation in Brisbane can be a bit of a tricky situation. Considering the town itself is built around a river that flows throughout the city, you need to take that into account when you are looking for a place. So, with that being said I have made a list of the top seven suburbs to live in Brisbane with a little description of each and what you will expect to pay per week.

1. St. Lucia

This would be a good option if you want to live right beside/on the University of Queensland campus. Its major plus is that it is close to campus, grocery stores and a gym. Other than that, there is not really any entertainment/nightlife. If you aren’t looking to live by a very loud and busy place and be walkable to classes, this is your area. Accommodation here can go anywhere between $180 –$250 for shared accommodation.

2. Toowong / Taringa

I’m going to be a little biased with this one because this is the area where I live.  It’s really close to campus and Toowong village. Buses come every five minutes in the morning, and takes only seven minutes to get to campus. Toowong village has a grocery store, gym, Kmart (it’s big here still) and a post office. There are also a couple little food shops around the village. There isn’t much for entertainment: no movie theatre, sports venues or bars really (minus the Royal Exchange). Shared accommodation can be around $260 – $300 per week.

3. Bowen Hills

If you don’t want all the fast-paced aspect of downtown and tall buildings, Bowen Hills would be your option. This area has a lot of modern apartments that can start at $250 per week. The only downside is that it is quite far away from campus and doesn’t have a great entertainment aspect.

4. South Brisbane

South Brisbane is right in the heart of South Bank: a busy riverfront stretch with cultural and science exhibits at the Queensland Museum, as well as art galleries and a giant Ferris wheel. Other major entertainment venues are the cineplex, brewpubs and uptown tapas bars. This would be a great place if you want to experience Brisbane culture and are a true foodie. You can find shared accommodation from around $250 per week, or a one-bedroom apartment from around $350 per week.

5. West End

West End is a good place to look if you are looking for cool cafés, weekend markets, and a big artsy vibe. Shared accommodation can be around $300 per week, or if you want to go up to around $500 for a really nice place if you have a bigger rent budget.

6. Highgate Hill

If you are on the lower end of the budget scale, Highgate hill is a good option. It’s close to transportation and tons of shops but does not offer very much for entertainment. If you just want a place to live to live this is a good place to look. Shared accommodation can start at $140 per week.

8. Woolloongabba

This is one of the main hubs for transportation to and from UQ. Woolloongabba is also home to the Brisbane Cricket Ground, also known as the Gabba, a vast sports stadium that hosts professional Aussie Rules football and cricket matches (a lot of fun to go!). There are a ton of great restaurants and vintage fashion shops. You can find shared accommodation from around $180 per week, or a one-bedroom apartment from around $300 per week.

Figuring out your housing arrangements

With all of these areas, the prices are just a guideline.  If you search hard enough, you can find some really good places at really good prices. It all depends on where you want to live and what you want to be around you. Do you want to live right in the thick of downtown with all the bars? Maybe a happy medium with food marketplaces and an art vibe? Once you have the area mapped out, you can start to look to getting all of your utilities and all that sorted.  Below, I’ve provided five tips to remember when figuring out your final housing arrangements.

  • Rent in your contract is due weekly rather than monthly. This seems like it’s a cheaper option when you look at the price initially but you have to remember that there are 52 weeks in a year and that you will be paying an “extra” four weeks of rent this way. Just something to think about when you are planning your budget.
  • If you get an apartment or condo, it doesn’t come furnished at all. My roommate and I were lucky enough that the two girls who lived there before us sold us everything in the apartment when we moved in. I mean everything: beds, desks, chairs, tables, washer, dryer, dishwasher, etc. When you look at the ad, be sure to check if it is furnished or comes with beds because it would be a nightmare to get all that settled.
  • Use Facebook marketplace or Gumtree (the Australian Kijiji) to find couches, TVs, and other appliances. If you are looking for a TV or a couch, Facebook marketplace usually has people giving them away for free as long as you come pick them up.
  • The price for rent is almost always without utilities. Sometimes back in Canada you have your utilities paid by the owner and included in the price. Here, it almost always doesn’t include utilities so you will need to set that up yourself as well as internet.
  • Don’t cheap out on the internet. Home truly is where the WiFi connects automatically. Get unlimited Wifi for your place, because after studying you’ll want to relax and binge watch Netflix. Trust me.

Before I end this blog I’m going to list a couple websites you can use to find your accommodation! As always, may the odds be ever in your favour.  😉

Anthony out.
@ac_mpt

First-year UQ physiotherapy student

Links

Friday, March 1st, 2019

Upcoming Macquarie University physiotherapy webinar

Each year, Macquarie University’s Doctor of Physiotherapy program receives glowing praise from students in our OzTREKK Student Survey.

Macquarie University Doctor of Physiotherapy

Macquarie’s Angela Stark with second-year DPT student (and Canadian!) Hiba Madhi

One of the most commonly loved parts of the program is the support it offers students and the cohesiveness of the faculty and student body. Someone critical to the development of the program and that culture is Macquarie Physiotherapy Clinical Education and Student Support Manager Angela Stark.

Ang, along with Hiba Madhi, a second-year student from Burlington, will be hosting a webinar for everyone considering studying physiotherapy. Discover more about

  • Macquarie University
  • Doctor of Physiotherapy
  • North Ryde, Sydney
  • Returning to Canada to practice (and the success of Macquarie students!)

Hiba will talk about her experience living in Sydney and what it’s really like to study physio at Macquarie. Both Ang and Hiba will be available for any questions you might have.

Macquarie Physiotherapy Webinar

Tuesday, March 5 
7 p.m. EST
Registration: anymeeting.com/PIID=ED58DB80814F3D

OzTREKK Student Reviews About the Macquarie DPT

“Program is great but difficult (fast pace). Very nice teaching staff for the most part. The university itself is situated a little far from the city which is sometimes inconvenient; however, everyone really cares about the students here which is really comforting. Also, MD and DPT students have many lectures together and clinical hours together which is really interesting and fun!” Eric A

“I am 4 weeks into my program. All the lectures and tutorials are very organized, and delivered with a purpose (developing our clinical reasoning, evidenced-based practice, and patient-centered care).” Fred W

“I like the small cohort; I feel like you get to know your classmates a lot more closely. I also like the enthusiasm of the instructors. They are enthusiastic and passionate about the content and deliver it in an interesting way.” William B

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Do you have any questions about the upcoming Macquarie Doctor of Physiotherapy webinar? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Lindsay Rewi at lindsay.rewi@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2019

Rehab sciences applications are now open!

Are you interested in studying physiotherapy? Occupational therapy? Chiropractic?

Rehab sciences applications are now open!

Learn how to apply!

You’ve come to the right place, because physio, OT, and chiro apps are open! And if you’re wondering why we continue to urge our students to apply early…. the answer is simple: some universities begin assessing applications early in the year, and those programs tend to fill before the deadline. Plus, some programs are starting in May/July or September/November 2019, and those deadlines are quickly approaching!

When you apply through OzTREKK, we will add you to our Rehab Sciences group so you will always be kept up to date regarding application deadlines, admissions requirements, program-specific webinars, OzTREKK and university in-person events, and much more!

How it works

We are here to support you throughout your entire journey—from application to arrival—for free. Extra bonus? Most of our Australian university partners waive their application fee for OzTREKK students.

And because we love to make our students smile, this year we’re giving away a GoPro HERO7 & Adventure Kit. Your name will be entered into the draw if you apply before February 15.

What does it take to get in?

Are your grades competitive? Do you have the right prerequisites? Register now for our upcoming webinar on Thursday, January 24 at 3 p.m. EST to learn more about what it takes to get in to each program.

Have any questions? Let us know! Email OzTREKK’s Rehabilitation Sciences Admissions Officer Lindsay Rewi at lindsay.rewi@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

Former OzTREKK student wins Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy award

Congratulations goes out to the most recent Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy graduates, and a special mention to the students and clinicians who received prizes and awards for their performance and contribution this year.

Former OzTREKK student wins Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy award

Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy 2017 Student and Clinical prize winners (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

All of us at OzTREKK would like to offer a round of applause to former OzTREKK student Thomas Nemeth, who won the Gerontology Physiotherapy Prize. Way to go, Thomas!

Think you might be interested in a career in physiotherapy? The Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy is Australia’s first three-year entry to practice graduate master’s-level program. Graduates will have the opportunity to pursue a career in a range of health settings, including hospitals, private practice, sporting and rehabilitation facilities, community organizations or as an advisor to government or industry bodies. This degree provides opportunities for pursuing employment globally.

In addition to core hands-on practical physiotherapy skills, key program features include advanced theoretical knowledge in areas such as pharmacology, radiology, leadership and management, sports physiotherapy and inter-professional education, including a faculty student conference.

Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy Admissions Timeline for 2019 Intake

Application deadline: June 29, 2018
Interview offers released: July 26, 2018
Skype MMI interviews conducted: August 5 – 16, 2018
Offers of admission released: mid- to late-September 2018
Deadline to accept offer (unconditional): November 9, 2018
Deadline to meet conditions (conditional): November 9, 2018

Melbourne DTP Snapshot

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: June 29, 2018; however, candidates are encouraged to submit their applications as soon as possible.

Apply to the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy Program!

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Find out more about the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy degree. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Carolyn Kowalewski at caroyln@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, April 10th, 2018

Strong results continue in QS subject rankings for University of Sydney

The QS 2018 Subject Rankings has recently rated two University of Sydney subjects in the top 10 globally and another 33 subjects in the top 50 globally: Sport, which encompasses physiotherapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation, was ranked second in the world and anatomy tenth.

Strong results continue in QS subject rankings for University of Sydney

Learn more about studying physiotherapy at the University of Sydney

Subjects ranked in the top 50 included veterinary science (11th), education (12th) and law (14th).

The university was ranked number one in Australia for architecture, English language and literature, modern languages, mechanical, aeronautical and manufacturing engineering, sports-related subjects and veterinary sciences.

QS also produces rankings for the five broad faculty areas as defined by QS, (not directly equivalent to the faculty structure of the University of Sydney), in which it groups its subjects. These QS faculty rankings showed overall improvement for the University of Sydney in social sciences and management, engineering and technology, life sciences and medicine.

Dr Michael Spence, Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the university said “Our continuing strong results in the QS rankings is a testament to the quality of our teaching and research across a broad range of disciplines.”

“The university aspires to be the best education and research institution in Australia and among the best in the world as we continue to solve some of the major challenges facing the Australian and international community.”

He pointed to the recent acquisition of a University of Sydney spin-off company producing a revolutionary biomedical technology that allows the body to repair elastic tissues in the skin, artery, bladder and lung.

Other recent international research led by the University of Sydney recommended a slightly longer delay to the clamping of pre-term babies’ umbilical cords—a finding that has the potential to save many tens of thousands of babies lives every year.

Domestically, research indicated that the original implementation of the income management program in the Northern Territory did not improve school attendance or early birthweight outcomes and had negative short-term effects.

“This year’s QS performance also included continuing improvement in our reputation with employers, which follows our graduates being named as Australia’s most employable three years running in the QS graduate employability rankings,” Dr Spence said.

The QS Subject Rankings score universities around the world on their reputation with employers and academics as well as their H-index as an institution (the H-index is a metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of a publication) and citations per research paper.

University of Sydney’s Master of Physiotherapy

Would you like to study at the #2 physiotherapy school in the world? You can! The University of Sydney offers a two-year, graduate-entry physiotherapy program, which is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in a related field and who wish to gain the requirements to become a physiotherapist. The Master of Physiotherapy at Sydney Uni is one of the most popular programs among Canadian students!

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March each year
Application deadline: Applications are usually assessed on a rolling basis (as they are received). The sooner you apply the better.

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply, you must have the following:

1. Completed an undergraduate degree from a recognized university.

2. Have achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 4.5, which the University of Sydney states is approximately equivalent to a credit average or better. A credit average at the University of Sydney is between a 65–74%. Your grades assessed for admission are based on your highest-ranked university degree.

3. Have completed undergraduate studies in the following prerequisite areas:

  • Human Anatomy
  • Human Physiology
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Neuroscience
  • Psychology

Apply to the University of Sydney Physiotherapy School!

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Would you like more information about studying at Sydney Physiotherapy School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Carolyn Kowalewski at carolyn@oztrekk.com.

Friday, March 2nd, 2018

OzTREKK presents the University of Sydney Health Sciences seminars

Are you interested in a career in physiotherapyoccupational therapyspeech pathologynursing, or another health sciences field?

Sydney Dental School

Don’t forget to RSVP for the Sydney Health Sciences seminars!

Then you are invited to discover why the University of Sydney is a world leader in health sciences education and research! Join OzTREKK and the University of Sydney for these information sessions—and bring your questions!

University of Sydney Health Sciences Seminars

Attend an upcoming University of Sydney Health Sciences information session (March 5 – 7) to find out what world-renowned health sciences teaching looks like.

University of Alberta
March 5, 2018 @ 5 p.m.
ED 106 – Education Centre
RSVP

UBC – Okanagan
March 6, 2018 @ 5 p.m.
Arts 110
RSVP

Simon Fraser University
March 7, 2018 @ 12 p.m.
South Sciences Bld – 7109
Meet USyd Physio grad who is now practicing in Canada!
RSVP

UBC – Vancouver
March 7, 2018 @ 5 p.m.
Memorial Gym – 208
Meet USyd Physio grad who is now practicing in Canada!
RSVP

Know before you go! Have a look at the health sciences degrees offered at the University of Sydney:

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Do you have any questions about the upcoming seminars? Let us know! info@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355. We look forward to meeting you!

Friday, October 6th, 2017

University of Melbourne physiotherapy students use augmented reality

From Pokémon GO to the classroom—how a collaboration between the University of Melbourne and Microsoft in AR is taking students under the skin of their patients.

Story by Andrew Trounson, University of Melbourne

Pokémon GO pushed augmented reality, or AR, into the mainstream, sending 500 million people around the world chasing cartoon characters on their phones. But now, in a unique multi-disciplinary collaboration, it’s making the leap from entertainment to education.

A new fusion of augmented reality, gaming technology, and anatomy is giving physiotherapy students at the University of Melbourne access to cutting-edge technology to take a look inside the human body by projecting different layers of muscles and bones over the top of a volunteer “patient.” It provides an inside view of how the body works as it moves in real time.

Melbourne physiotherapy students use augmented reality

Learn more about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

The technology, called the Augmented Studio, is designed to radically enhance the teaching of physiotherapy where students currently use their knowledge of anatomy to understand how muscles work beneath the skin of a patient because they can’t see through them. But the Augmented Studio, developed by researchers at the University of Melbourne, bridges the gap between that theory and practice.

By using tracking sensors mounted on a scaffold it projects images of our muscles and skeleton directly onto a volunteer. The images automatically follow the shape and movement of the body, giving students in the studio space an interactive all-round view of how our bodies work. It can even allow them and their teachers to “draw” on the projected image to make information and action more explicit.

“What we are doing is overlaying virtual models of what we look like underneath our skin and synchronising that with real human action,” says Dr Thuong Hoang, who is a Research Fellow at the Microsoft Research Centre for Social Natural Users Interfaces at the University of Melbourne.

The Augmented Studio was built by Dr Hoang, computer engineer Zaher Joukhadar and Phd student Martin Reinoso, who adapted Microsoft’s Kinect body sensing and tracking device as well as “RoomAlive” projection technology, both of which were originally designed for computer gaming. Once a person steps into the projection space and forms a T-shape with their arms outstretched, the trackers lock on to them and the projected image conforms to their shape and movement.

At the moment the projected overlay doesn’t show how our muscles actually move when we contract and relax our muscles. Instead, it tracks the body and movement at the joints. But eventually Dr Hoang wants to add in animation that can show the actual movement of muscles as the model moves.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy lecturer Dr David Kelly says the students quickly embraced the technology during pilot sessions in 2016, which are continuing in 2017. He says the combination of live movement and interaction, in which students could actually move and feel the model’s limbs, helps them to grasp the relationship between their learned anatomy and how it works dynamically.

“For first-year students it can be really hard to bring together anatomical knowledge with how the body actually works because it can be difficult to visualise. But when they see a real person who they can interact with, while also seeing the muscles and skeleton projected over the top, combined with the ability to draw and write on the body, it all becomes much easier for the students to learn about how the body moves,” says Dr Kelly, from the Melbourne School of Health Sciences.

The Augmented Studio also provides a more visual and intuitive way of learning that Dr Kelly says will benefit those students who naturally learn more easily by direct visualisation, rather than through reading and listening. “There has always been a group of students that struggle because the limited ways in which we have to teach may not conform to how they learn best,” he says.

Developments in AR, which seeks to use technology to enhance what we can already see, hear and feel in the real world, are far ahead of chasing GPS tracked Pokémon. There are viewing devices such as glasses that can overlay what we see with three-dimensional graphics, video and holograms, and we can generate projections like games that people manipulate by moving our hands.

The big advantage of the Augmented Studio over advances like 3D holograms is that the students can actually touch and move the body, making it a much more interactive experience. They also don’t have to wear headgear, which means it could potentially be used in bigger settings with larger numbers of students.

“It has always been hard to capture the dynamic side of how our anatomy works, so the difference here is the high level of interaction you can achieve. The student can, for example, ask the model to kick and they can then look at variations from different angles at what is happening as someone kicks,” Dr Kelly says.

The Augmented Studio is still in early-stage development and Dr Kelly would love to see it migrate to using muscle animations. Dr Hoang is also working to develop a system for the student interaction with the model to be automatically recorded onto their tablets so they can have a permanent record of what they were learning.

Another challenge is to find a way to make the studio more transportable and quicker to set up. At the moment the studio can work very effectively in a dedicated tutorial space where it could be permanently set up, but Dr Kelly says a more portable set up would increase its flexibility for teaching.

The Augmented Studio is an extension of Dr Hoang’s earlier work exploring how virtual reality and body tracking could be used to help guide body movement for dance and marital arts students. Arising from a collaboration between the physiotherapy department’s Teaching and Learning director, Associate Professor Louisa Remedios and Professor Frank Vetere, Director of Microsoft Social NUI, Dr Hoang started working with the physiotherapy department on developing a teaching aid. He then realised that virtual reality, in which you are immersed in an entirely created world, wasn’t suited to teaching physiotherapy that is very hands on.

“When we got into the class rooms we had to change our thinking. VR just wouldn’t work in the tactile environment in which they learn and practice,” Dr Hoang says. It was when he noticed that students kept referring back to anatomy charts when they were practicing on each other that he started thinking of using augmented reality to put the virtual muscles on the body

Dr Hoang is now working on extending the tracked projection technology to various health and fitness areas, and even in performance art. He says that using tracking sensors with projections it is possible to create guides that show people how to position their bodies for practicing fitness, sport and dance.

Using virtual reality headsets he and PhD student Martin Reinoso have already developed a prototype that allows a martial arts teacher to remotely instruct students on the right position to hold. By using body tracking and linked headsets student can match their movement to align with those of their teacher. There is also scope to project information on our own body’s performance, such as heart rate and breathing, so it is visible either on our projected selves or on a nearby surface.

“The innovation we have created isn’t just limited to the fixed information that we have been projecting so far. If can be used to project dynamic information onto yourself or any surface around you,” Dr Hoang says. “All of what I’m dreaming of is very possible.”

About the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

Eligible University of Melbourne Physiotherapy candidates for admission will have completed undergraduate studies in human anatomy and human physiology at the university level. Other subjects which may be helpful for physiotherapy applicants include psychology, physics, biomechanics, research methods, evidence-based practice, statistics, biochemistry, and additional units of anatomy.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Next available intake: February 2019
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2018 intake, the application rounds closed June 1 and July 27, 2017.

Apply to the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy Program!

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Would you like to learn more about the University of Melbourne Physiotherapy program ? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

What is the difference between occupational therapy and physiotherapy?

There is often confusion between physiotherapy and occupational therapy. There are significant differences between the two professions, but also many areas where they overlap.

What is the difference between occupational therapy and physiotherapy?

OT can help kids with various needs improve their cognitive, physical, sensory, and motor skills

  • Physiotherapy (or physical therapy) is a health care profession with a focus on assessing, improving and restoring physical function.
  • Occupational therapy also looks at physical function, but extends this to consider how this affects your ability to engage in occupation such as daily activities, leisure and work.

Occupational therapy also addresses the range of requirements for the patient including their mental and emotional well-being. Occupational therapists also have the knowledge and training to work with people with a mental illness or emotional problems such as depression and/or stress. Occupational therapists are also trained in adapting the environment or prescribing special equipment to help people reach their full potential.

OTs often work alongside physiotherapists, as part of a team of health professionals. While some areas may seem to overlap, (for example hand therapy), occupational therapists use and adapt occupations to treat or prevent occupational dysfunction due to physical, mental or environmental factors.

You will find occupational therapists working with patients across the human lifespan from infants to aged care and end of life. OTs work across the spectrum of services from mental health to acute medical and surgical services in various areas:

  • Aged care
  • Child health services
  • Community health services
  • Disability services
  • Independent living centres
  • Mental health services
  • Non-government organisations
  • Private practice
  • Public and private hospitals
  • Rehabilitation facilities
  • Research and development
  • Schools and tertiary education
  • Workplace health

Bond University Master of Occupational Therapy

Bond University’s Master of Occupational Therapy degree will take just two years full time to complete because of Bond’s unique accelerated three-semesters-a-year structure.

The program is the first occupational therapy master’s degree in Australia to provide the opportunity to complete a clinical research project or undertake business electives in preparation for an occupational therapy career in health management or private practice.

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Intakes: May and September each year
Duration: 2 calendar years (6 semesters)
Application deadline: No set deadline. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply to the Bond Master of Occupational Therapy program!

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Do you have questions about studying at Bond Occupational Therapy School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Griffith University to offer health sciences degrees in Brisbane in 2018

Growing demand for allied health services has translated to growing opportunities for students seeking healthcare careers outside the traditional medicine and dentistry degrees.

The sector is surging, with an ageing population and onset of chronic disease driving patient volumes, and a focus on prevention and new technologies improving outcomes.

Griffith to offer health sciences degrees in Brisbane in 2018

Find out how you can study health sciences at Griffith University

Griffith University has responded by bringing three of its most-respected allied health programs—physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech pathology—to Brisbane for the first time.

Professor Andrea Bialocerkowski, Griffith’s School of Allied Health Services Head, says the new degrees are great news for Brisbane students.

“Griffith has offered these programs on the Gold Coast for many years—we’re certainly not new to the game. From 2018 Brisbane students will benefit directly from our faculty’s experience and industry connectivity,” says Andrea.

Just as allied health professionals collaborate to deliver care, Griffith allied health sciences students undertake interprofessional learning alongside one another.

“Students in these degrees learn with those studying other health degrees such as nutrition and dietetics, exercise physiology, medicine, nursing or pharmacy,” she says.

“Their collaboration provides a practical understanding of how their profession interacts and functions within the sort of multidisciplinary team that deliver healthcare today.”

While all three degrees have the power to change lives, Andrea says each has defining features that may help students choose which is best for them.

Demand for the Bachelor of Occupational Therapy degree is expected to grow with the National Disability Insurance Scheme coming online and the discipline’s emergence in schools and aged care facilities.

“This is a very future-focused degree and includes a focus on entrepreneurship and work-integrated learning that commences in the first trimester of study,” says Andrea.

Andrea says the new Bachelor of Physiotherapy is a streamlined replacement for Griffith University’s highly regarded Master of Physiotherapy, which was offered for almost 20 years.

“The new degree caters for high school leavers and offers an extremely wide clinical placement network, extending from far north Queensland to Tasmania, as well as Griffith’s nationally renowned expertise in simulated learning.”

Master of Speech Pathology students, says Andrea, receive industry placement from their first trimester of study and tackle a curriculum focused on clinical immersion.

“Clinical immersion is a key aspect of the intensive two-year curriculum and students gain exposure to a variety of settings to work with adults and children,” Andrea says.

Are you interested in studying health sciences at Griffith University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, July 27th, 2017

UQ physiotherapy student tackles global health issues

University students from across the globe are exploring the connections between society, economics, environment and health at the U21 Health Sciences Summer School in Johannesburg.

UQ physiotherapy student Leah Davis and nursing and midwifery students Elizabeth Bartetzko, Anne Tin and Sophie Bonser are representing the University of Queensland at the event.

UQ health sciences students tackle global health issues

UQ physio student Leah Davis (Photo: UQ)

Ms Davis said her passion for the sociological study of human health had been fired by the class, gender and ethnicity disadvantage she had observed.

“I’m from a rural Queensland town where I attended public schools, worked at the local pharmacy and stood in lines at the financial aid offices,” she said.

“It was within these environments, surrounded by members of every class and nationality, that I first started to foster the idea that people’s health can’t be solely determined by a purely biomedical model.

“Attending this summer school is a dream come true that will allow me to gain knowledge and develop tools to help those who weren’t lucky enough to be born within the bubble of privilege.

“I’m most excited to be given the opportunity to grow as a person and as a health student.

“I believe in the importance of expanding my world beyond the life I know and am used to, and so it is going to be life-changing to witness first-hand the health struggles those in developing countries experience.”

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Associate Dean (Academic) Professor Sarah Roberts-Thomson said the students were ideal candidates to represent UQ.

“They have such an exciting opportunity to collaborate and share knowledge, expertise and experiences with other health students from across the world,” Professor Roberts-Thomson said.

“The interdisciplinary discussions and interaction will be invaluable to their personal and career journeys ahead.”

The theme of the summer school at the University of Johannesburg is Global Health and the Social Determinants of Health.

Students will visit private and public health care facilities and cultural and historical sites, meet with communities, and participate in interdisciplinary activities.

The summer school will bring together students from dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, midwifery, nutrition, medicine, public health, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, audiology and optometry, all from U21 Health Sciences Group member universities.

About the University of Queensland Physiotherapy program

The University of Queensland offers a learning environment and has assessment requirements designed to facilitate the advanced and intensive learning appropriate for a master’s-level program. The Master of Physiotherapy Studies introduces graduates to the profession of physiotherapy and its key concepts in intensive mode during an initial summer semester. UQ physiotherapy students develop an understanding of the principles of scientific method, critical analysis and research design and apply them to professional practice. Students learn to appreciate the physiotherapist’s role in health promotion, injury prevention and effective treatment planning, implementation and evaluation.

Did you know there are approximately 40 spots available in the program? For the 2017 intake, 17 OzTREKK students accepted their international student offers!

Program: Master of Physiotherapy Studies
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next available intake: November 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: UQ has a general application deadline of May 30 each year; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply now to the UQ Physiotherapy School!

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Would you like more information about studying at UQ Physiotherapy School? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy School Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.