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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Occupational Therapy Schools’

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Griffith University to offer health sciences degrees in Brisbane in 2018

Growing demand for allied health services has translated to growing opportunities for students seeking healthcare careers outside the traditional medicine and dentistry degrees.

The sector is surging, with an ageing population and onset of chronic disease driving patient volumes, and a focus on prevention and new technologies improving outcomes.

Griffith to offer health sciences degrees in Brisbane in 2018

Find out how you can study health sciences at Griffith University

Griffith University has responded by bringing three of its most-respected allied health programs—physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech pathology—to Brisbane for the first time.

Professor Andrea Bialocerkowski, Griffith’s School of Allied Health Services Head, says the new degrees are great news for Brisbane students.

“Griffith has offered these programs on the Gold Coast for many years—we’re certainly not new to the game. From 2018 Brisbane students will benefit directly from our faculty’s experience and industry connectivity,” says Andrea.

Just as allied health professionals collaborate to deliver care, Griffith allied health sciences students undertake interprofessional learning alongside one another.

“Students in these degrees learn with those studying other health degrees such as nutrition and dietetics, exercise physiology, medicine, nursing or pharmacy,” she says.

“Their collaboration provides a practical understanding of how their profession interacts and functions within the sort of multidisciplinary team that deliver healthcare today.”

While all three degrees have the power to change lives, Andrea says each has defining features that may help students choose which is best for them.

Demand for the Bachelor of Occupational Therapy degree is expected to grow with the National Disability Insurance Scheme coming online and the discipline’s emergence in schools and aged care facilities.

“This is a very future-focused degree and includes a focus on entrepreneurship and work-integrated learning that commences in the first trimester of study,” says Andrea.

Andrea says the new Bachelor of Physiotherapy is a streamlined replacement for Griffith University’s highly regarded Master of Physiotherapy, which was offered for almost 20 years.

“The new degree caters for high school leavers and offers an extremely wide clinical placement network, extending from far north Queensland to Tasmania, as well as Griffith’s nationally renowned expertise in simulated learning.”

Master of Speech Pathology students, says Andrea, receive industry placement from their first trimester of study and tackle a curriculum focused on clinical immersion.

“Clinical immersion is a key aspect of the intensive two-year curriculum and students gain exposure to a variety of settings to work with adults and children,” Andrea says.

Are you interested in studying health sciences at Griffith University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

Don’t miss the upcoming pre-departure webinar for new Bond University students!

Calling all semester 3 Bond University Juris Doctor and Master of Occupational Therapy students! You’ve got lots to do before you book your flight to the Gold Coast. This is where OzTREKK comes in.

Don't miss the upcoming pre-departure webinar for new Bond University students!

Don’t miss your pre-dep webinar July 30

OzTREKK is proud to support our students from start to finish, so that means we help you with your application, your offer, your acceptance, your pre-departure preparations—and your arrival!

Since our Bondies are scattered across Canada, we will be hosting a pre-departure webinar on Tuesday, August 1 at 8 p.m. to connect everyone together. Just like the in-person, pre-dep seminars, the webinar is a great opportunity to get prepared for this exciting, new step in your life!

Date: Tuesday, August 1, 2017
Time: 8 p.m. (EST)
Venue: Online

The webinars provide an excellent avenue to learn more about the Australian student visa process, your accommodation options, Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC), travel arrangements, banking and finances, and general info about the Australian lifestyle and culture. Essentially, the session breaks down what to do prior to leaving Canada and what to do upon arrival in Australia.

This is your chance to get your questions answered—and reassure your family members to boot!

Remember, there is no such thing as a silly question: If you are wondering about how to get a cell phone, you can bet everyone else is, too. Questions are via chat, so ask away, Bondies!

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Make sure to contact your OzTREKK admissions officer if you have not yet received your Bond University pre-dep webinar log-in info!

Friday, May 19th, 2017

About the Bond Master of Occupational Therapy program

Are you looking for a rewarding career in health care?

About the Bond occupational therapy program

Learn more about studying OT at Bond University

The Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine at Bond University is recognised for the excellence of its education and research in the medical, health and sports sciences. Bond offers the two-year graduate-entry Master of Occupational Therapy, which is designed to produce highly competitive graduates with comprehensive clinical skills as well as solid business acumen and research experience.

It is the first occupational therapy master’s in Australia to offer you the opportunity to complete a clinical research project or undertake business electives in preparation for a career in private practice. You will engage in research training before specialising in one of two elective pathways:

  • Clinically-focused Research Pathway – the clinically focused research pathway culminates in an individual research project that may be eligible for publication. This pathway prepares you for entry into higher research degrees and careers in research and academia, as well as bolstering research networks; or
  • Business-focused Research Pathway – enables you to undertake business electives that will enable you to undertake management roles, and better prepare you to work in the growing private sector. The pathway culminates in an industry research project where you will apply both research and business skills.

You will be taught by academics and industry staff who are current practicing clinicians with up-to-date industry knowledge.

Bond University Master of Occupational Therapy

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Next intake: September 2017
Duration: 2 calendar years (6 semesters)
Application deadline: No set deadline. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Entry requirements

The minimum academic entry requirement is an undergraduate degree in health sciences or other related degree with

  • one semester of anatomy,
  • one semester of physiology, and
  • two semesters of psychology or sociology or behavioural science.

Apply now to Bond Occupational Therapy School!

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Do you have questions about studying Bond University’s Master of Occupational Therapy program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 9th, 2017

UQ occupational therapy graduate shares how his unexpected hobby helped his career

UQ occupational therapy graduate Lachlan graduated in 2016. He recently commenced working with the RISC Association, where he assists people with severe and multiple disabilities to develop independence and belonging through socialisation and recreation in the community. In the future, Lachlan hopes to pursue further opportunities for occupational therapy research, particularly in the area of sensory modulation. Here is Lachlan’s story!

“Finishing my occupational therapy degree was not the most important thing that happened to me last year.” Perhaps not the best opening line to use at my first professional job interview, but I stick by what I said.

Last year I took up piano lessons, which turned out to be the most valuable learning curve during 2016. This was something that I had wanted to do for years; however, only recently had I plucked up the courage to become an adult beginner—which was slightly terrifying for me.

UQ occupational therapy graduate shares how his unexpected hobby helped his career

UQ Occupational Therapy graduate Lachlan K (Photo: UQ)

I like to think that my lecturers at UQ would not have been disheartened by my claim because the piano lessons proved to me exactly why occupational therapists are so crucial in our community. My love of practicing and wanting to improve really showed to me how important it is for individuals to have the freedom and physical ability to follow our passions, hobbies, and daily tasks. This is exactly what underpins the core value of what we as occupational therapists strive to achieve through our profession.

For me, the significance I place on my weekly piano lessons is a reflection of what I learnt as an occupational therapy student. The activities each of us participate in on a regular basis express who we are. I learnt, as an occupational therapist, that we have the opportunity to help our clients participate in activities that are uniquely important to them. By working together, we can draw on their strengths to overcome barriers and help them create meaning and purpose in their everyday lives.

To be honest, when I first started my degree I assumed that studying occupational therapy meant I would basically be a physiotherapist with a more confusing title. However, within a few short weeks, I realised I was training in exactly the right profession.

When I graduated, I had a wealth of theoretical knowledge (primarily in the form of frameworks, definitions and models) and a growing body of clinical experience. I have countless memories from my two years studying my Masters, but there is one in particular that encapsulates what I love about this profession.

Last year, I was on a ten-week placement at a rural hospital, where a key component of my role was working with adults undergoing rehabilitation following a stroke. Together, we set goals and worked towards re-engaging in the activities they found important. In a hospital this can be challenging, we tried to find ways to simulate a home environment to practice cooking and a supermarket environment to practice shopping. One of my older clients was experiencing a homonymous hemianopia following his stroke—in other words, he could not see anything in his left field of vision. While talking to him, I found out that he was a musician and playing piano was extremely important to him.

His hemianopia presented many challenges for piano playing as it meant that he would often read only the right side of the sheet music (which lead to some abstract interpretations of classic songs) and he was prone to ignoring the left half of the piano. We worked together with my supervisor and developed strategies to support his playing. For example, by drawing a line with a coloured highlighter on the left side of the page, he found it easier to remember to scan all the way to the left before reading the next line of his music.

On the ward, we were lucky to have an electric piano in the dining room and each day we would practice just before lunch. When he was playing, we would often have nursing staff stop by the room simply to watch and listen as he played and sung. After we finished our sessions together, I would often walk past the dining room to see him still playing 20 minutes later, still surrounded by a small crowd. He expressed how much it meant to him to be able to do something “normal” after such a challenging event, not to mention the effect that his playing had on the collective mood in our ward. It clearly had an effect on me too, as here I am a year later on my own piano journey.

About the UQ Occupational Therapy program

The UQ occupational therapy program program equips graduate-entry students with the theoretical knowledge, clinical skills and professional attributes necessary for a career in occupational therapy.  In addition to a focus on clinical occupational therapy practice, emphasis is placed on the use of prior skills and knowledge to enhance the effectiveness of occupational therapy practice; and the development of advanced adult learning skills for ongoing professional development.

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy Studies
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next available intake: July 2018
Duration: 2.5 years
Application deadline: February 27, 2018

Apply to the UQ Occupational Therapy School!

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Do you have any questions about studying at UQ Occupational Therapy School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com for more information!

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

Australian rehabilitation sciences degrees: are you eligible to apply?

If you’re considering applying to a rehabilitation sciences degree at an Australian university, you know there can be a few items on your “how to apply” checklist that need attention. This is where OzTREKK comes in.

OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh specializes in programs like physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, chiropractic science and audiology, and she knows the ins and outs of the specific assessment criteria required by each university. Here are some of Krista’s tips about getting yourself prepared when you’re ready to apply!

How do I know if I am eligible to apply?

If you are considering starting an application for one of our programs in rehabilitation sciences, first you will need to find out if you are eligible.

Australian rehabilitation sciences degrees: are you eligible to apply?

Find out how you can study physiotherapy (Photo: University of Melbourne)

In order to determine this, you will need to find out two main things:

  • Have you taken the necessary courses to meet the program prerequisites?
  • Is your cumulative GPA (cGPA) competitive?

If you are unsure of this, I can generally let you know after taking a quick glance at your transcript.

Proving that you know your stuff

Please keep in mind that our universities will typically first screen based only on whether or not you have taken the courses to meet their prerequisites. Some schools have a form to fill out to highlight what you have taken for the admissions team, and most schools require you to send detailed course outlines for each subject.

If your application does not include a biomechanics course outline (as an example), they will not know that you’ve taken it. Furthermore, if they feel that your course outlines don’t meet their standard (i.e., they lack detail), your application’s assessment will stop and you will receive an unsuccessful outcome.

Admissions will not go into your transcripts for a GPA calculation until they have determined you’ve covered the material they require.

Which transcript are they looking at?

In order to calculate your cGPA, our universities will only be looking at the transcript from your most recently completed degree. If you have taken courses that are not part of that degree, they will not be calculated in that assessment; however, in order to see a full picture of your academic background, you are required to mail us all transcripts from any previous university or college studies.

Krista’s tips for a competitive application

Apply Early – Ideally,  you will need to have all of your documents sent to me no later than a week before the deadline. The more time I have to review your documents, the more time there is for feedback. There have been a number of students who have submitted their documents on deadline day who were unsuccessful because there were problems with their documents. Keep in mind that I receive a flood of emails and documents right before the deadline and that makes it difficult for me to review everything for you properly.

Include Course Outlines (Syllabi) as soon as possible – if the program that you apply to requires you to submit course outlines. This is in fact a requirement, and not a request.

  • Please ensure that your course outlines are detailed with information about what was taught in the course. This will often appear in a lecture schedule or list of topics.
  • Textbook, faculty information, and course dates are also important! Please take a look through your course outlines to ensure that they contain relevant detail before sending them to me.
  • If you don’t have your course outlines on hand, please contact the faculty under which you took the courses to request them.
  • Ensure that your course outlines are within 2 years of when you took the course. (For example, if you took a course in 2012, the outline must come from 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 or 2014. Please do not send me one from 2009 or 2015 as those are outside of the 2 years.)
  • When possible, please email the course outlines. Hard copies can delay the processing of your application.

Find out more about studying rehabilitation sciences at an Australian university

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Do you have questions about choosing the right rehabilitation sciences degree for you? Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com for more information about your study options!

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

University of Sydney ranks number one in sport, physiotherapy and rehabilitation

The University of Sydney has been ranked first in the world in the recently released 2017 QS subject rankings for the new category that comprises physical therapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation.

University of Sydney ranks number one in sport, physiotherapy and rehabilitation

Deputy Dean (Strategy) Prof Michelle Lincoln, Dean Prof Kathryn Refshauge, and Deputy Dean (Academic) Prof Sharon Kilbreath celebrate the news (Photo: University of Sydney)

The subject areas are encompassed by a range of disciplines within the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

“We are enormously proud to have been recognised in this way by our peers in academia and employers of our graduates,” said Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences Professor Kathryn Refshauge.

The QS subject rankings score universities around the world on their reputation with employers and academics, as well as measuring the productivity and citation impact of the publications of academics (also called the ‘H-Index’) as an institution and citations per research paper.

“The QS rankings are a particularly rich ranking system because it takes into account all aspects of our work: education, research and employability of our graduates.

“These rankings reflect performance across the whole faculty, from professional staff to academics to students,” said Professor Refshauge.

The Faculty of Health Sciences offers a range of undergraduate and graduate entry courses in the disciplines included in the ranking category, such as exercise and sport science, exercise physiology, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology.

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Are you interested in studying at the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com for more information about your study options.

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

Attend a Sydney Health Sciences Seminar

Would you like to further your studies in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology or another health science field?

Attend an upcoming University of Sydney Health Sciences information session between March 28 and 30 and get your questions answered!

Venue: University of Toronto, Bahen Centre, Room 2175
Date: Tuesday, March 28
Time: 6 p.m.

Venue: Simon Fraser University, Halpern Centre, Room 114
Date: Wednesday, March 29
Time: 5 p.m.

Venue: University of British Columbia, Woodward Building, Room 3
Date: Thursday, March 30
Time: 5 p.m.

Be sure to RSVP for a Sydney Health Sciences Information Session!

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Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Interested in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology? The University of Sydney would like to meet you!

Are you interested in a career in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology or another health science field?

University of Sydney Health Sciences Seminars

Don’t forget to RSVP for the University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions!

Then you are invited to discover why the University of Sydney is a world leader in health sciences education and research!

Attend an upcoming University of Sydney Health Sciences information session between March 28 and 30 to find out what world-renowned health sciences teaching looks like!

Please RSVP here to save your spot!

University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions

Venue: University of Toronto, Bahen Centre, Room 2175
Date: Tuesday, March 28
Time: 6 p.m.

Venue: Simon Fraser University, Halpern Centre, Room 114
Date: Wednesday, March 28
Time: 5 p.m.

Venue: University of British Columbia, Woodward Building, Room 3
Date: Thursday, March 30
Time: 5 p.m.

Study Health Sciences at the University of Sydney

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the application deadline was September 30, 2016.

Apply to Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

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University of Sydney Master of Physiotherapy

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March
Application deadline: Applications are usually assessed on a rolling basis (as they are received). The sooner you apply the better.

Apply to the University of Sydney Physiotherapy School!

Be sure to RSVP for a Sydney Health Sciences Information Session!

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Would you like more information about the upcoming Sydney Health Sciences seminars? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

Exploring occupational therapy as a career option


What exactly is occupational therapy and how does it differ from physio?

Exploring occupational therapy as a career option

UQ offers a Master of Occupational Therapy Studies program! (Photo: UQ)

Unlike physiotherapy, which evaluates and helps to maintain and restore physical function, occupational therapy helps to solve the problems that interfere with a person’s ability to do everyday things, like dressing, bathing, washing dishes, eating, and other tasks most of us take for granted. Occupational therapy can also help to prevent a problem or minimize its effects.

When do people see occupational therapists?

Usually, occupational therapists are sought when a disability, injury, illness or other problem limits someone’s abilities to care for himself, participate in work, or just enjoy regular leisure time or hobbies. These skills and regular activities are so important to us as people that they often describe how we view ourselves—we identify with our jobs and activities. When disability or injury prevents someone from being able to accomplish a simple, everyday task such as buttoning a shirt, it can affect how he or she feels about himself.

That’s where an occupational therapist comes in.

What do occupational therapists do?

Occupational therapists are highly trained health-care professionals, and they define an occupation as much more than a chosen career. Occupation refers to everything that people do during the course of everyday life, including feeding and dressing themselves. Everyone has many occupations that are essential to our health and well-being.

According to the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, “occupational therapists use a systematic approach based on evidence and professional reasoning to enable individuals, groups and communities to develop the means and opportunities to identify, engage in and improve their function in the occupations of life. The process involves assessment, intervention and evaluation of the client related to occupational performance in self-care, work, study, volunteerism and leisure. Occupational therapists may assume different roles such as advising  on health risks in the workplace, safe driving for older adults, and programs to promote mental health for youth.”

Depending on the particular situation, an occupational therapist will check

  • what one can and cannot do physically (including strength, coordination, balance, or other physical abilities);
  • what materials are used in the occupation (e.g., cooking utensils, clothing, tools, furniture, etc.);
  • what one can and cannot do mentally (coping strategies, memory, organization skills, or other mental abilities);
  • the social and emotional support available in the home, school, work and community; and
  • the physical setup of the house, school, workplace, classroom, or other environment.

Occupational therapists are also trained how to help others cope with their disabilities. OT can help with coping strategies, strength, coordination, and confidence, and recommend changes to environments that will be helpful. Community support may also be available, and the occupational therapist will also assist with finding specialized transportation, support groups, and funding agencies.

Where do occupational therapists work?

Occupational therapists are generally employed in community agencies, hospitals, chronic care facilities, rehabilitation centres and clinics, schools, social agencies industry or are self-employed. While some occupational therapists specialize in working with a specific age group, like the elderly, others may specialize in a particular disability such as arthritis, developmental coordination disorder, mental illness, or spinal cord injury.

Australian Occupational Therapy Schools

If you are finishing high school, the following Australian universities offer a four-year undergraduate occupational therapy degree:

The following Australian Occupational Therapy Schools offer two-year graduate-entry OT programs for those who have already completed an undergraduate degree:

Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions

If you’re curious about studying occupational therapy and other rehab sciences degrees, don’t miss the upcoming seminar at Western University. Enjoy refreshments and the opportunity to speak with Australian uni representatives and alumni to learn more about how you can study in Australia and practice in Canada! Be sure to RSVP to save your spot.

Western University
Date: February 9, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: UCC, Room 210

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Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh krista@oztrekk.com if you have any questions about studying occupational therapy at an Australian university!

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

Applying to a rehabilitation sciences program? Application deadlines are approaching!

Australia is world-renowned for its leading-edge rehabilitation sciences research and practice, and Canadians enjoy learning from Australian academics who are world leaders in their fields. If you would like to apply to a rehabilitation sciences program at an Australian university, this is a reminder that the application deadlines are approaching for the following programs:

Applying to a rehabilitation sciences program? Application deadlines are approaching!

Happy UQ physio students enjoying OzTREKK Orientation

Macquarie University

University of Queensland

Monash University

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If you have any questions about studying physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, or audiology at an Australian university, contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Discover more about your program entry requirements, practicals, and about how you can take your degree home to practice in Canada. Krista can answer your questions!