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Articles categorized as ‘Griffith University Nursing School’

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

Providing healthcare in Laos prepares Griffith nursing student

Providing healthcare in a developing country wasn’t something Rachael Ovington expected to be doing while studying a Bachelor of Nursing at Griffith University.

But it was an experience she will never forget and will take with her when she seeks employment as a full-time nurse next year.

Providing healthcare in Laos prepares Griffith nursing student

Bachelor of Nursing student Rachael Ovington spent time in Laos helping provide healthcare. (Photo credit: Griffith University)

Rachael is one of almost 50 third-year Griffith Nursing students to travel to Laos this year as part of work integrated learning placement within the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Griffith University was the first university health team to administer healthcare in in this rural district of Laos Laos, commencing work with this community Development Project in 2010.

“Being able to provide healthcare to people that have nothing and no access to health services because they live rurally really made me appreciate the healthcare we have in Australia and made me want to do so much more for them,” Rachael said.

“The community were really excited and happy to see us and so grateful and appreciative that we were there to help.

“This experience helped build my nursing skills in general as you have to do everything manually so your assessment skills need to be strong.  It also made me more aware of cultural sensitivities, which I will take with me well into my career.”

Rachael said her group, who were supervised by two Griffith staff members and two volunteer nurses, found many people to be suffering from colds and flus and physical injuries caused from manual labour.

She said they also provided a lot of health education to the children such as oral hygiene and hand washing, as well as teaching correct methods for lifting large objects safely.

“We took a bag of donated clothes to every village we went to, which we fundraised before we left,” she said.

“It was quite cold when we were there and to see some kids walking around with no shoes and in clothes that were too small was heartbreaking.

“We couldn’t do everything but we did the best we could.”

Griffith School of Nursing and Midwifery International Programs Director Hazel Rands said students who travelled to Laos were in a unique position and would be looked upon favourably by future employers.

“This experience is unique because it is recognised as clinical hours by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority and it enables student to be challenged by the extremes of poverty, poor communication and working with limited resources,” she said.

“Griffith seeks to prepare our students to become global citizens and this three-week experience allows them to see another healthcare system, live in a challenging environment, learn about themselves and acknowledge the unique set of skills that they have to offer as health professions upon graduation.”

Rachael is due to graduate at the end of 2016.

Nursing at Griffith University

The Griffith Nursing is committed to the development of nursing practice, theory and research in positive and visionary ways. The school is also committed to the development of graduates imbued with a solution-focused philosophy who will make a positive difference in nursing, midwifery and health care. Through developing research, consultancy and continuing education opportunities, Griffith seeks to serve the nursing and midwifery professions, the health care system and the broader community.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

*

Learn more about Griffith Nursing School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com for more information!

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Griffith graduate a finalist in Nurse of the Year award

Significantly improving the immunisation rates in her local community has been the highlight of a nursing career for Gillian Hermosilla-Silva.

Named a finalist in the 2016 HESTA Australian Nursing Awards, the Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing graduate says she was ‘delighted and overwhelmed’ to have her efforts recognised in coordinating an immunisation outreach service for Logan City Council.

Griffith graduate a finalist in Nurse of the Year award

Gillian Hermosilla-Silva (Photo credit: Griffith University)

“We already knew that Logan has a very diverse socio-economic population and that there seemed to be issues with people getting immunised or getting them done in a timely manner,” says Gillian.

“When we made enquiries we noticed that there were patterns emerging showing how factors such as transport difficulties and childcare issues were proving problematic in parents getting their children to immunisation appointments.

“There is a general consensus that immunisations are important, but given that there was always going to be obstacles in the way for some people, I realised that the immunisations needed to be brought to them.”

Home-based appointments

It was in 2013, that Gillian set about organising a schedule of home-based appointments for people within the local community for whom visiting the clinics presented a problem.

“Predominantly our service is aimed at babies and children with the usual round of vaccinations such as whooping cough, diphtheria and MMR,” she says.

“At the moment, statistics indicate a rise in the cases of whooping cough, so exposing unprotected vulnerable children to the infection is something we really want to avoid.

“We do also see quite a few children who are placed within the Department of Child Safety; there is really a very wide range of need out there in the community.

“We also see a number of adult patients with various complications such as being on home oxygen and who may be at high risk of influenza. These people are also very important to us, in regard to vaccinating to support their health and for the benefit of the wider community.”

Gillian says that the two-day-a-week service has been extremely well received by the public, which has seen over 4,000 people and provided over 7,000 vaccines.

Currently 93% of children aged 12mth – <15 months are fully vaccinated which is slightly above the QLD average of 92.7%.

“I now have a team of 20 nurses that cover the service and visit approximately 10 homes per day with up to 4-5 children in each, so it’s going well,” she says.

“Twelve years ago, when I graduated from Griffith, I would never have dreamed I would have won an award for a mobile immunisations service, but it’s been a fantastic journey mainly within women’s and children’s health.

“The Griffith program set me up for a great career with so many options.”

Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

*

Are you interested in Griffith Nursing School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Griffith in top 50 of world’s leading universities under 50

Griffith University is the only Queensland university to be ranked on all major university rankings*; in the top 400 globally and in the top 50 world universities under the age of 50.

The latest Times Higher Education 150 Under 50 Rankings has placed Griffith at 48, a climb of 34 places from last year’s position of 82.

Griffith Nursing School

Griffith Nursing is ranked 29 in the world

This impressive rise follows last month’s QS Subject Rankings in which Griffith placed in the top 100 institutions worldwide in nine subject areas with Griffith Nursing ranked 29 in the world. Griffith scored in 37 subject areas, confirming its status as one of Australia’s most comprehensive research and teaching universities.

Vice Chancellor and President of Griffith University, Professor Ian O’Connor said the latest ranking provided further recognition of Griffith’s position as one of Australia’s leading universities.

“This is confirmation of Griffith’s growing influence as a leading institution of research and teaching excellence,” Professor O’Connor said.

“Griffith is now in the top 50 in both the Times Higher Education and QS (37) Top 50 Under 50, one of two Queensland universities to achieve this distinction.

“In addition, the university is now in the top 400 overall on all major world rankings.”

In January, Griffith University was placed 102 in a list of 800 of the world’s most international universities in the Times Higher Education rankings and second in Queensland.

In October 2015 it was named among the world’s top 300 universities in the Times Higher Education World Rankings for 2015-2016. A total of 13 performance indicators were considered for the Times HE rankings including research, citations, teaching, international outlook and industry engagement.

*The three major world rankings are the Academic Ranking of World Universities, QS World University Rankings and Times HE World University Rankings.

Study Nursing at Griffith University

The Griffith School of Nursing and Midwifery is committed to the development of nursing and midwifery practice, theory and research in positive and visionary ways. The school is also committed to the development of graduates imbued with a solution-focused philosophy who will make a positive difference in nursing, midwifery and health care. Through developing research, consultancy and continuing education opportunities, Griffith seeks to serve the nursing and midwifery professions, the health care system and the broader community.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

*

Are you interested in Griffith Nursing School? If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Griffith Nursing and Midwifery climb QS Rankings

Griffith is celebrating following the release of the annual QS World University Rankings which have placed the university’s nursing and midwifery programs at 29th in the world.

It is the first time that Griffith University has had a discipline in the top 30.

Griffith Nursing School

Griffith Nursing student Chloe Baker (Photo credit: Griffith University)

“It’s not surprising that Griffith’s nursing and midwifery programs have ranked so high,” says Head of Griffith School of Nursing and Midwifery Professor Debra Anderson. “This result has arisen from the combined approach of the vision of our school to be a global leader in education and research scholarship, alongside the long-standing hard work of staff to achieve this vision. We are delighted at this result.

“The suite of undergraduate and postgraduate programs offered by the school provides a high-quality learning experience through innovative, flexible and evidence-based education to ensure our graduates are well placed to influence and make meaningful lifelong contributions to their communities and society.

“The ranking also confirms the outstanding achievement of our internationally renowned researchers and the high quality and impact of their work. This was recently evidenced by the school recently receiving a top ERA Research Excellence Ranking of 5 for showing ‘well above world standard’.”

“This is a spectacular result and a real reflection of the calibre of our senior researchers and our evidence-based focus on teaching,” added Professor Tony Perkins, Dean (Academic) Health.

“At Griffith, we also have a very strong clinical focus with strong partnerships with providers such as the Gold Coast University Hospital.”

The Griffith nursing and midwifery program achievement comes as the university achieves its best ever result, firmly illustrating its strength across disciplines.

Griffith was ranked in the top 100 institutions worldwide in nine subject areas (up from five in 2015) including a top 50 position in Nursing and Midwifery.

Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing

The Bachelor of Nursing at Griffith University is a 3-year degree. Griffith nursing students will develop their skills through clinical placements across the health sector and will have opportunities to undertake rural, remote and overseas placements.

Clinical placements are an integral component of the Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Midwifery programs that allows students to link theory to practice in a meaningful way.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan campus, suburb of Brisbane, Queensland
Next semester intakes: February and October 2017
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

*

Would you like more information about Griffith Nursing School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015

Griffith nursing professor honoured

Professor of Nursing Claire Rickard from Griffith University has been made a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences. This is the first year the honour has been extended to nurses.

Professor Rickard is Director of the Griffith-based Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR), the largest research group in the world investigating intravascular access, and the success of their work can be measured in hundreds of millions of dollars of reduced health care costs worldwide, as well as improved patient comfort.

Peripheral intravenous catheters, usually inserted into a patient’s hand or arm, are the most commonly used device in hospitals around the world with an estimated 300 million used in USA each year and 14 million in Australia.

“It doesn’t matter what health issues you have; whether you are treated in an ambulance or a hospital; whether you have cancer, or you need hydration or antibiotics; whenever you need sustained access to a blood vessel to provide treatment, a catheter must be inserted into a vein or artery,” Professor Rickard said.

“At AVATAR we have a really experienced, large group of researchers with very strong scientific skills particularly in vascular access, and we investigate practices in hospitals that have never been tested before to see which ones work and which ones don’t.”

For about 40 years, peripheral catheters were routinely replaced every few days, even if there were no problems. It was thought that doing this would minimise the risk of a blood infection, or a painful irritation within the blood vessel called phlebitis. So AVATAR undertook randomised controlled trials to see if this was true.

Challenging tradition

More than 3,000 patients were involved in the study funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and it was found that leaving a functioning catheter in place beyond three days until it was no longer required made absolutely no difference to the onset of infection or other complications.

These findings heralded significant change for patient comfort and health care cost savings. In the US alone, changing to the new policy of re-siting only as required policy insertions would save one million staff hours and US$400 million over five years. For Queensland Health that would amount to $5 million dollars in savings every five years.

Global influence

AVATAR now has research partnerships with more than 100 hospitals and universities around the world and the influence of AVATAR is growing.

“Each week we have overseas hospitals contacting us to say they have changed their standard of practice for catheter replacement based on our research findings. In the UK it is now mandatory for all adult NHS hospitals to follow clinically indicated catheter replacement.”

That is just one example of the work being undertaken by AVATAR. With another 80 research projects currently underway, even with the support of her team of 25 paid staff, much of Professor Rickard’s time is now taken up with leading this powerful research alliance. But she has never lost the thrill of discovery herself.

“I still love analysing data. I love getting those results from a two-thousand-patient study and thinking, ‘What does this mean? What is the message here?

“We want the patients to have the best experience they can, whether that mean less pain or fewer infections, or reduced time in hospital because they have had more effective treatment. That’s what drives us.”

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Are you interested in Griffith Nursing School? If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at 1-866-698-7355 or email rachel@oztrekk.com.

Monday, July 27th, 2015

International honour for Griffith nursing professor

Griffith University’s reputation as a world-leading authority in nursing has been firmly cemented, following news that Professor Wendy Chaboyer is being inaugurated into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

Professor Chaboyer has travelled to the awards in Puerto Rico for the ceremony July 25.

Griffith Nursing School

Native Canadian Professor Chaboyer is being inaugurated into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame (Photo credit: Griffith University)

Operated by Sigma Theta Tau International, the awards recognise members who are nurse researchers and who have achieved significant and sustained broad national and/or international recognition for their work and whose research has impacted the profession and the people it serves.

Professor Chaboyer from the Centre for Health Practice Innovation, a part of Griffith’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland, has been acclaimed following a 13-year successful track record of research leadership both at Griffith and in nursing.

Her research focuses on patient participation in patient safest activities such as clinical handover and pressure injury prevention. This work aims to promote active patient engagement in their hospital care.

“This is really the pinnacle of my career and a public acknowledgement of how I have contributed to the nursing profession,” says Professor Chaboyer who is also the director of the first nursing centre of research excellence funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

“My goal all along has been to continually develop nurses’ capacity for high-quality research, which has never been as important as it is now. Mentoring early-career researchers has been an important part of my role and I have been extremely honoured to provide mentorship to many researchers, clinicians and students.”

Originally trained as an intensive care nurse in her native Canada, Professor Chaboyer arrived at Griffith 21 years ago, coordinating the first Master of Critical Care Nursing program in Queensland in 1994.

In 2002, as a response to a Griffith University call, she led a research centre grant submission, which was subsequently awarded in 2003. Named the Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor Chaboyer became its foundation director and remained its director until she became the Director of the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence.

Her personal area of research has focussed on patient safety and the role nurses play in improving the quality of hospital care and patient outcomes.

“My research has centred on the nurses’ role in preventing or mitigating patient risk and subsequent harm because nurses provide care twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Therefore it makes sense to focus on the role nurses can play to promote patient safety.”

Professor Chaboyer said her biggest wish is to overturn the ideology saying that nurses should be trained in hospitals rather than educated as professionals in universities.

“At local, state and national level, we are seeing an increase in the very uninformed opinion that nurses would be trained best in hospitals.

“Nursing is a profession, not simply a trade. In universities, nurses are educated to become the critical thinkers and quick decision makers that they need to be in order to provide high quality patient care.

“Critical thinking is crucial to the training behind today’s nurses.”

Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

*

Would you like more information about Griffith Nursing School?Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Griffith grows its international nursing reputation

Griffith University’s reputation as a world-leading authority in nursing has been firmly cemented, following the announcement that Professor Wendy Chaboyer will be inaugurated into the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

Griffith University Nursing School

Learn more about Griffith Nursing School

Operated by Sigma Theta Tau International, the awards recognise members who are nurse researchers and who have achieved significant and sustained broad national and/or international recognition for their work and whose research has impacted the profession and the people it serves.

Professor Chaboyer from the Centre for Health Practice Innovation, a part of Griffith’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland, has been acclaimed following 13 years of research leadership both at Griffith and in nursing.

Her research focuses on patient participation in patient safest activities such as clinical handover and pressure injury prevention. This work aims to promote active patient engagement in their hospital care.

“This is really the pinnacle of my career and a public acknowledgement of how I have contributed to the nursing profession,” says Professor Chaboyer, who is also the director of the first nursing centre of research excellence funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council.

“My goal all along has been to continually develop nurses’ capacity for high-quality research, which has never been as important as it is now. Mentoring early career researchers has been an important part of my role and I have been extremely honoured to provide mentorship to many researchers, clinicians and students.”

The first Master of Critical Care Nursing program in Queensland

Originally trained as an intensive care nurse in her native Canada, Professor Chaboyer arrived at Griffith 21 years ago, coordinating the first Master of Critical Care Nursing program in Queensland in 1994.

In 2002, as a response to a Griffith University call, she led a research centre grant submission, which was subsequently awarded in 2003. Named the Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Professor Chaboyer became its foundation director and remained its director until she became the Director of the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence.

Her personal area of research has focused on patient safety and the role nurses play in improving the quality of hospital care and patient outcomes.

“My research has centred on the nurses’ role in preventing or mitigating patient risk and subsequent harm because nurses provide care twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Therefore it makes sense to focus on the role nurses can play to promote patient safety.”

Professor Chaboyer said her biggest wish is to overturn the ideology saying that nurses should be trained in hospitals rather than educated as professionals in universities.

“At local, state ,and national level, we are seeing an increase in the very uninformed opinion that nurses would be trained best in hospitals.

“Nursing is a profession, not simply a trade. In universities, nurses are educated to become the critical thinkers and quick decision makers that they need to be in order to provide high-quality patient care.

“Critical thinking is crucial to the training behind today’s nurses.”

Professor Chaboyer will be travelling to Puerto Rico in July to be inducted into the International Nursing Hall of Fame.

Griffith University Bachelor of Nursing

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Logan, Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Nursing School!

*

Are you interested in Griffith Nursing School? If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at 1-866-698-7355 or email rachel@oztrekk.com. Find out how you can study nursing in Australia!