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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Medical Schools’

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

Australian medical school rankings 2019

When you consider studying at an Australian medical school, one of the first things that may pop into your mind is, Will the quality of education be the same?

study medicine at an Australian university

Learn more about Australian medical schools

The short answer is yes. Absolutely.

There are medical schools here in Canada, so why do so many Canadians consider studying in Australia? Because Australia and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Australian medical schools offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting! Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their incredible world rankings. Australian medical schools are world-ranking, with four of OzTREKK’s university partners in the top 50 in the world. These are not second-rate institutions, so don’t be worried that you will get a mediocre education.

The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2019 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2019

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
13th University of Toronto
19th McGill University
30th University of British Columbia
43rd McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian medical schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian medical schools in top 50)
QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2019

Learn more about Australian medical schools

Every year, we assist hundreds of Canadian students choose the right Australian medical school program. We understand admissions requirements and application procedures to Australian medical schools, and we can guide you through the differences between undergraduate streams and graduate-entry streams, and the considerations for practicing medicine following graduation.

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Would you like more information about studying medicine in Australia? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer at medicine@oztrekk.com!

Monday, March 4th, 2019

OzTREKK Ambassadors: Getting around Sydney

So I don’t know about you, but I’m a sucker for a good transit system. I know that seems really random, but hear me out!

Macquarie University Medical School

Follow me on Instagram!

I think you can learn a lot about a city, it’s infrastructure, and it’s people just by observing the transit system. As someone from a small city in Ontario (with kind of a laughable transit system) my only exposure to large city transit has been Toronto. I know I can hear the groans, but honestly I don’t think Toronto transit is that bad… for the most part things are on time and you can usually get to where you need to go easily.

But boy oh boy, was I in for a treat when I moved to Sydney. The transit here is—so far—impeccable. I’ll go into the details in a bit, but first I want to address that I understand this is pretty Sydney-specific, so USyd and Macquarie University, you’re welcome. For all of you reading who know you won’t be living in Sydney, scroll down to the last section for my general tips, tricks, and some links!

Types of Transit in Sydney

Throughout Sydney you have your standard busses, and of course it’s a large city so there are also inner-city trains (think subways but better), and Sydney is built around a harbour, which means ferry boats (McDreamy is swooning—I just know it)!

To board any of the transit you can use an Opal card. For anyone in the GTA it’s the same as a Presto Card. You can load the Opal cared with a specific amount of money or connect to a credit card. To board you simply tap on, and tap off—even the busses! Opal also has an app for iOS and Android which you can use to monitor your balance, plan routes, and see live updates of bus timings.

Ferry Boats

While you probably won’t use ferries for your day-to-day commute, they are a must for the days you have free to do some gallivanting and be a real tourist. My first view of the Sydney Opera House was when I took the ferry from Milsons Point to Circular Quay and I definitely recommend it.  If you’ve been on a ferry before I don’t know that these boats will be any different. I have to admit my ferry experience is limited. Weather permitting, try to be near the front of the line so you can stand at the front of the boat for the best views.

A cheap tourist trick is to take the “slow ferry” (the lines are labelled, don’t worry), for the entire route. You’ll see all the different docking points and get all the great views of the Opera House and the Harbour Bridge. All from the water which is just gorgeous! Remember to wear sunscreen during that trip for sure!

Busses

Busses are much more likely to be your main mode of transit day in and day out. I know that sounds like a drag, but the busses here are actually really clean. In fact, all of the transit is. The bus stops are frequent enough you never have to walk too far. The bus routes overlap in a good way with more direct routes passing some but not all the stops, and while the busses may not be on time there is a transit app which is very accurate. Also, the busses are air conditioned, which makes them little oases on your trip about town.

Sydney is covered in bus-only lanes, which means that some routes (at least the one I’m lucky enough to live on) gets to dodge a lot of the Sydney traffic, meaning my commute to and from school doesn’t really change depending on the time of day.

I did realize there is a caveat to such nice and clean busses. They *technically* don’t allow food and drink on board. That’s not to say I haven’t been let on a really busy bus with a coffee, but that’s also not to say I haven’t been not allowed on because I’ve had a coffee in my hand. So if you want to bring anything other than water and it’s open in your hands, just be aware you’re playing with fire.

Macquarie University Medical School

Visiting the Sydney Opera House

Trains

The trains here were my first exposure to Sydney transit and they are beautiful. To me they are used like a subway but appear more like a GO train (again, references for my GTA peeps. Sorry!), but better!

I remember first standing on the platform and not being aware of how close the train was, because it was so quiet! Can you imagine a GO train or a subway sneaking up on you? That quietness continues inside, and riding in the trains is really quite pleasant. The quiet engine means it’s quiet inside. Generally, the people are polite and quiet too, and it’s really clear which stop you’re at and which you are approaching.

The trains are mainly above ground, but do go through the occasional tunnel so don’t entirely rely on your app for accurate location readings. Just make sure you keep track of the stops and you’ll be fine!

The coolest thing about the Sydney trains is that you never have to sit backwards! In the middle of each carriage, the backs of the chairs are on hinges that let them flip so you can always face the direction of travel. I received some really funny looks when I purposefully sat backwards to avoid sitting beside a stranger, and I could have avoided the interaction and still faced forwards. It’s the little things in life really.

What Sydney Does Well

So to summarize all that gushing, here’s what I love about the Sydney transit:

  1. Opal! – The Card and the app. It’s easy to pay, it’s easy to navigate, it’s a plus.
  2. Air conditioning – making your commute cooler with each trip.
  3. Cleanliness – It’s honestly so nice to sit on a bus that doesn’t smell*

*I have been on one bus that was a bit musty… but it was also full of high school students who appeared to have just left gym class… so I’ll let you be the judge of that.

My General Tips and Tricks

  1. USE IT. Try it out when you first arrive; it will help your adjustment so much. I know it can be really intimidating to understand any new city let alone how to get around, but the only way you’ll master it is by trying. So when you first arrive, make a point of using the transit to find your school, a shopping mall, popular tourist destination, or anything really. Make sure to give yourself lots of extra time these first few trips to make them a little less stressful, missing a bus your second day in your new home is a lot less stressful than missing the bus or getting lost on your first day of classes.
  2. ASK. Seriously, don’t be afraid to ask. I’ve had a few bus drivers save me from heading in the wrong direction. That can be a bit nerve-wracking for some people (me being one of them), but you can always ask any locals in your class Facebook pages, other OzTREKKers who were there before you, or any roommates/hosts you have. Find out how to pay, where you can buy a pass if you need one, and they can share any tips they have.
  3. BE PREPARED. For your first few adventures bring some change (just in case), have a fully charged phone (just in case), and write down the route and stops (just in case!). It makes it a lot less stressful and means you’ll be ready if the pass doesn’t work, you get lost, or your phone dies.

Exploring a new city can be really scary, so give yourself some time to get used to it. Honestly, feeling like I mastered the transit was the first moment I really felt like I could live here. It was a sense of freedom, independence, and belonging all rolled into one that I didn’t expect and I’m so happy I found it pretty quickly.

I know that was a lot about transit, but I hope you could get something from it!

See you in the next one! Bye!

Emma
@emmab_md

First-year Macquarie University Medical School student

Links*

*I quickly looked up these links. Be sure you do your own research if you’re moving to any of these cities, including Sydney! The information may have changed.

Tuesday, February 26th, 2019

OzTREKK Ambassadors: My first impressions of Griffith Medical School

OzTREKK Ambassador Cameron Bowers has just begun her journey at Griffith Medical School, and she’s here to share her very first impressions!

Griffith medical school

First day at Griffith Medical School!

My first day

I’d been dreaming of the first day of medical school for years. I didn’t quite know what to expect, but I was so excited. I felt like a little kid on their very first day of school!

Truth be told the whole day felt surreal. It was a lot of different presentations by faculty welcoming and congratulating us on getting into medical school. They told us that our careers would be full of ups and downs, and stressed the reality that we would be in charge of people’s lives in a matter of years. I soaked it all up and with each “congratulations,” it started to feel more and more real.

The day ended with all of us standing and reciting our “Medical Students’ Affirmation.” It’s the equivalent of vows for medical school—promising to uphold respect for the profession we are entering, pledging to pursue our study of medicine with integrity and honesty, etc. I must admit that hearing ~160 students reciting these affirmations about our future was very powerful. It was the moment that made all of this feel real for the first time. I could feel the emotions mixing up inside, a combination of sheer joy, giddy excitement, fear of the unknown, and being overcome by the power of all of these voices together. We were all about to start something that would fundamentally change every single person in the room and yet no one could possibly know in which ways we would all evolve.

Some things I wish I had known

The first few weeks have been incredible, challenging, exhausting, exciting, and inspiring. It’s really fun to learn about a topic that I am so passionate about. It feels very different compared to undergrad (or grad school) because everything we are learning is applicable to a future patient. I think that might be why sometimes it feels more exhausting, because everyone is so keen to take in all of the information for fear we won’t know everything. But I am trusting in the curriculum to eventually get us to become competent physicians in four years (which at the moment still sounds surreal).

With all of that said, there are a few things that I wish I had known in the first few weeks:

Griffith University medical school

Enjoying the view — view of Griffith University campus from PBL rooms

1. Griffith undergraduate bridging program
Griffith has a two-year “bridge” program for Australian high school students to go directly from high school into a two-year medical science undergrad program. After those two years, the entire medical science cohort (~60 people) enters the medical school. This has a few implications:

  1. The age of the “med sci” students is young; I believe about 25% of my class is <20 years old.
  2. They have been in a program together for the last two years so they all already have friends and friend groups. This was a bit confusing to a lot of us Canadians on the first day as everyone appeared to already be in friend groups.

2. Anatomy labs
The anatomy labs (cadaver labs) are “self directed,” which means it’s a bit of a free-for-all. There are a number of second-year students you can ask for explanations or to clarify where something is, and they are fantastic! Seriously hard to imagine I will get to that level in just a year.

But other than that there is no structure. They give you a few pages as a lab worksheet to fill out the night before that outlines the main topics for the lab, but the actually learning is up to you. It’s definitely not like undergrad anatomy labs. You have to make sure you bring questions to ask, and be outgoing enough to ask those questions in a loud environment with lots of other people trying to learn using the same cadavers. It is an adjustment, but I’ve had three labs so far and it’s completely doable, just a bit of a surprise in week 1.

3. Griffith is amazing
I wish I had really understood how incredible Griffith University is and how they focus on creating well-rounded people, who are also fantastic doctors. I didn’t realized how unique Griffith Medical School is compared to other schools with regard to their focus on communication and the other “softer” part of being a great doctor (more on that to come in future blog posts!).

Overall I couldn’t be happier with my decision, and I am slowly settling into a schedule trying to work on finding balance between school, exercise, social life, and my relationship with my incredible husband.

If you ever have any questions about Griffith medicine, please feel free to reach out.

Until next time!

Cameron
@noborders.md

Thursday, February 21st, 2019

OzTREKK Ambassadors: Being mentally prepared for your move to Australia

Welcome to the very first OzTREKK Ambassador blog!

At OzTREKK, we are proud to assist you throughout your entire journey—from your very first questions to predeparture to greeting you in Australia for our on-campus In-Australia Meet-ups.

Because we’ve been doing this since 2002, we know there can be bumps along the way. The key to traversing the bumps and hairpin turns is to have a positive attitude and to know you have a support system (and when to seek help if you need it!). In fact, all our Australian universities have international student support services available to help you with any issue, especially when you may feel overwhelmed and homesick.

University of Melbourne MD student

Follow Josh on Instagram!

Meet OzTREKK student ambassador Josh Walt, a Melbourne MD student who has agreed to document his Australian journey—including some of the stuff other people may forget about—like how to adjust to life in Australia and how to make sure you have a support system in place.

Take it away, Josh!

The Overwhelming Beginning and The Importance of Coping Mechanisms for Mental Health

I would be lying to you if I said that moving across the world didn’t come with its challenges.

After landing, it took over two weeks to find a place in a location somewhat close to campus and another week to settle in comfortably. Maybe my roommate and I were some of the unlucky few, but on move-in day we were shocked to see the apartment that was “professionally cleaned” still had Oreos under the mattress, dark brown stains on them, gum between the couch cushions and multiple miscellaneous sticky and greasy substances all over the cutlery, plates and other furniture. Setting up our WiFi took two weeks longer than the company had guaranteed. It’s a good thing phone plans here provide you with 40GB of data a month!

Although, after going to the Victoria night market, the Royal Botanical Gardens, the storage units on Brighton Beach etc., it is safe to say it was all worth it!

First Day of Orientation

To add to the stress of moving across the world, the first thing that was said in orientation was that the MD program at The University of Melbourne was one of the hardest and most demanding courses offered. The school’s academic mentors, counselling and psychological services then followed this speech by stating more than 50% of the students who see them seek support for mental health issues. A larger portion of these students have never experienced mental health problems before. Leading to why I am reaching out to all you prospective students today…

The Most Successful Students

My point is not to scare anyone off, only to share that it was a difficult move. I want to emphasize the importance of coping mechanisms for mental health. Especially as an international student, you have the pressure of school and the added stress of moving across the world without a social network.

These counsellors went on to say the most successful students are the ones who make time for their music, sports, social life, travel etc., because it is so important for your mental health as a student in a challenging professional program. Fortunately, there are a variety of ways to manage stress that will help you succeed and attain your dream degree—the reason you headed to Australia in the first place!

I know it’s a long time away, but I know once I finish and get that medical degree all the stress and hard work will be worth it!

Excited for the next chapter!

Josh
@mddownunder

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019

Don’t miss the upcoming medical licensing webinar

Finding out what comes after medical school is a big deal. To help make the process a little smoother, OzTREKK hosts medical licensing webinars to assist future Australian medical school students to understand the ins and outs of returning to Canada and the USA, or staying in Australia as an international medical graduate.

Don’t miss the medical licensing webinar

During the webinars, you will learn more about the following topics:

  • Australian medical school systems and structure
  • Australian med school rankings
  • Medical degree titles such as MD and MBBS;
  • Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination, NAC OSCE, MCCQE1
  • Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) program and rates
  • Provincially specific programs available to international medical graduates
  • Latest information on the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia
  • Pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia
  • Process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor
  • Information about the licensing examinations in Canada and the US, what they are, when you need to sit them, and the application process
  • Latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia

…and much more, so get your questions ready.

Date: Wednesday, February 13
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario time)
RSVP: amanda@oztrekk.com

Learn more about studying at an Australian Medical School

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Would you like more information about the upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing webinar? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Amanda Rollich at amanda@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

Congratulations to our Griffith University scholarship winners!

OzTREKK Students with Griffith University Scholarships

One of the biggest supporters of international students is Griffith University, with several scholarships available! All of us at OzTREKK are proud to announce that a ton of OzTREKK students have won Griffith University scholarships!

Griffith University students

OzTREKK students headed to Griffith University – 2018 predep Meet & Greet

Physiotherapy

  • Nicholas K – Master of Physiotherapy – 25% tuition waived for duration of program

Speech Pathology

  • Sydney C – Master of Speech Pathology – 25% tuition waived for duration of program

Environmental Science

  • Ashley J – Bachelor of Environmental Science – 25% of tuition waived for duration of program
  • Jenna M – Bachelor of Environmental Science – 25% of tuition waived for duration of program

Law

  • Nathaniel T- Bachelor of Laws – 25% of tuition waived for duration of program
  • Tyler J – Bachelor of Laws – $5,000 (two payments of $2,500 over two trimesters in first year of program)

Medicine

  • Rogges A – Doctor of Medicine – $10,000 (two payments of $5,000 over two trimesters in first year of program)
  • Imran B – Doctor of Medicine – $10,000 (two payments of $5,000 over two trimesters in first year of program)
  • Melanie F – Doctor of Medicine – $10,000 (two payments of $5,000 over two trimesters in first year of program)
  • Charanpreet S – Doctor of Medicine – $10,000 (two payments of $5,000 over two trimesters in first year of program)
  • Priscilla M – Bachelor of Medical Science/Doctor of Medicine – $10,000 (two payments of $5,000 over two trimesters in first year of program)

Dentistry

  • Joshua C – Bachelor of Dental Health Science & Master of Dentistry – $5,000 (two payments of $2,500 over two trimesters in first year of program)
  • Ava B- Bachelor of Dental Health Science & Master of Dentistry – $5,000 (two payments of $2,500 over two trimesters in first year of program)
  • Jessica K- Bachelor of Dental Health Science & Master of Dentistry – $5,000 (two payments of $2,500 over two trimesters in first year of program)
  • Jeffrey S- Bachelor of Dental Health Science & Master of Dentistry – $5,000 (two payments of $2,500 over two trimesters in first year of program)

Congratulations to everyone and happy studying!

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What are you interested in studying at Griffith University in Australia? Griffith offers many different scholarships for international students. Discover more about how you can study in Australia. Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call us toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

Sydney Medicine and Dentistry Info Sessions

Have you ever considered studying medicine or dentistry at the University of Sydney in Australia? How can studying in Australia advance your career?

Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars

Don’t forget to save your spot!

Join OzTREKK and the University of Sydney for the upcoming Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars to discover more about your study options.

During these casual info sessions, you will have the opportunity to speak with the deans of Sydney Medicine and Sydney Dentistry, and will learn more about why the University of Sydney is one of the top universities in the world.

Enjoy refreshments, speak with University of Sydney medicine and dentistry alumni! Learn more about what happens after graduation and the accreditation process so you can practice in Canada!

You have questions—we aim to answer!

Sydney Medicine & Dentistry Seminars

University of Toronto
Date: February 4, 2019
Time: 5 p.m.
RSVP here!

Western University
Date: February 5, 2019
Time: 5 p.m.
RSVP here!

University of Alberta
Meet a Sydney medicine and a Sydney dentistry alum at this event!
Date: February 6, 2019
Time: 5:30 p.m.
RSVP here!

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Learn more about studying medicine or dentistry at Sydney Uni! Please let us know if you have questions about these information sessions! Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

 

Monday, January 14th, 2019

Medicine applications are open!

We have some more exciting news… our medicine applications are officially open!

When you apply through OzTREKK, you will be automatically added to our medicine group so you will always be up to date regarding

  • application deadlines; 
  • admissions requirements;
  • medicine webinars; 
  • OzTREKK and university in-person events; and
  • much more!

How It Works

We’ve created this short video to walk you through the whole process, step by step!

We are here to support you throughout your entire journey—from application to arrival—for free. Extra bonus? Most of our Australian university partners waive their application fee for OzTREKK students. 

Don’t forget: this year we’re giving away a GoPro HERO7 & Adventure Kit. Your name will be entered into the draw (once per student) if you apply before February 15.

Medicine Admission Webinar

Are your grades competitive? Register now for our upcoming webinar on Thursday, January 17 at 3 p.m. EST to learn more about what it takes to get in to each of our medical schools.

Every year, OzTREKK assists hundreds of Canadian students choose the right Australian medical school program. We understand admissions requirements and application procedures to Australian medical schools, and we can guide you through the differences between undergraduate streams and graduate-entry streams, and the considerations for practicing medicine following graduation.

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Do you need help with your medical school application? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Amanda Rollich at amanda@oztrekk.com. We’re here to help!

Tuesday, November 27th, 2018

Don’t miss the next medical licensing webinar

If you’re considering studying medicine in Australia, finding out what happens after you graduate is a very important step.

Medical Licensing webinar

Don’t miss the Medical Licensing webinar on Nov. 29

To help make the process a little smoother, OzTREKK hosts medical licensing webinars to assist future Australian medical school students to understand the ins and outs of returning to Canada and the USA, or staying in Australia as an international medical graduate.

During the webinars, you will learn more about the following topics:

  • Australian medical school systems and structure
  • Australian med school rankings
  • Medical degree titles such as MD and MBBS;
  • Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination, NAC OSCE, MCCQE1 and MCCQE2
  • Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) program and rates
  • Provincially specific programs available to international medical graduates
  • Latest information on the licensing process in Canada, the US and Australia
  • Pathways to becoming a doctor in Canada, the US and Australia
  • Process of how to apply in Canada, the US and Australia to become a doctor
  • Latest developments and news related to licensing and accreditation from the various forms of government and medical bodies in Canada, the US and Australia

…and much more… so get your questions ready! You’ve got questions, and we’ve got answers!

OzTREKK Medical Licensing Webinars

Date: Thursday, November 29, 2018
Time: 7 p.m. EST / 4 p.m. PST
Register now!

 

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Would you like more information about the upcoming OzTREKK Medical Licensing webinar? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com!

Friday, November 16th, 2018

Don’t miss the UQ Medicine seminars November 19 & 20!

What does it take to get UQ Medicine? Besides great grades and a passion to help others?

Don't miss the UQ Medicine seminars November 19 & 20!

Get the details here and save your spot.

Find how you can get into a medical school that is turning high-achieving students into world-class health professionals—the UQ Faculty of Medicine!

Join OzTREKK and the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine Dean Prof Stuart Carney and Head of Admissions Dr Fabiola Aghakhani Zandjani-Martin for the upcoming UQ Medicine seminars and find out why UQ Medicine is one of the best in the world.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Seminars

Find out more about UQ Medicine admissions, program structure, clinical placements… and about practicing in Canada after you graduate!

Get your questions answered!

Western University
Monday, November 19, 2018

University of Toronto
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Please be sure to register!

UQ Doctor of Medicine FAQs

Can I come back to Canada to practice?
Yes. Licensure to practice medicine requires the completion of an accredited postgraduate training program, known as a residency, as well as the completion of national qualifying exams.

Are my grades competitive?
Eligible candidates must have an undergraduate degree with a cumulative GPA of a B (~70%).

When is the application deadline?
Applications are assessed on a rolling-admissions basis and are assessed and ranked as they are received. Candidates are encouraged to apply early.

Do I need to sit an admissions test?
Yes. Applicants must have achieved a minimum score of 504 in the MCAT; or 50 in each section of the GAMSAT.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next available Intake: January 2020
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. Applications generally open in early spring each year.

How does OzTREKK help?

As an official representative of 13 Australian universities, OzTREKK has helped send thousands of Canadian students to Australia for professional degrees like medicine. We are funded by our Australian universities, and our services are free. We assist you at every stage—from application to arrival, to understanding medical licensing—so nothing is forgotten. OzTREKK is your Canadian connection to study in Australia!

Don’t forget to RSVP!

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Would you like more information about the upcoming UQ Medicine info sessions? You got it! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com or call us at 1-866-698-7355.