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Articles categorized as ‘Macquarie University Linguistics Programs’

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Macquarie University international scholarships

What does the Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship cover?

Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship is a partial scholarship for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, the amount is varied up to AUD$10,000 and it will be applied towards your tuition fee.

Macquarie University

Study at Macquarie University

Priority areas: Engineering, Environment, Human Science, Media, Linguistics, and Education.

Application Deadline – June 29, 2016

The Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarships do not provide financial support in the form of a living allowance, nor does it provide for the cost of visa application, Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC), airfares, accommodation, conferences or other costs associated with study.

The Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship is a single scholarship and not available to be renewed. Please note that applicants can only receive one scholarship.

Applicants applying for the Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship will not be required to submit a referee’s report or a statement of purpose. Once you have completed the online scholarship application form, a confirmation email will be sent to you at your nominated email address. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Environment

Degree: Master of Environment (Environmental Management)
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

The Master of Environment offers an interdisciplinary approach to environmental management. A major focus of the degree is to teach you how to work with people from different disciplinary perspectives in order to find environmental solutions.

You will study areas such as

  • sustainable development;
  • environmental decision making;
  • environmental management and analysis; and
  • environmental law.

Engineering

Degree: Master of Engineering
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

The program covers key areas of professional electronics engineering systems design, delivery and management, including:

  • Very Large Scale Integration Algorithms and Systems
  • High Performance Integrated Circuit Design
  • Reconfigured Electronics
  • Telecommunications Performance Analysis
  • Hetrogeneous Networks, Theory and Practice

Linguistics

Degree: Master of Applied Linguistics
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

It is internationally relevant and focuses on the development of analytic skills and understanding the complex relationship between language use and context, and research in these areas. The degree is designed to allow candidates to study a broad range of topics within the area of Applied Linguistics. In particular, the degree has been designed to provide a strong theoretical and practical foundation in the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language.

Education

Degree: Bachelor of Education (Primary or Secondary)
Duration: 2 years full time
Semester intake: February

The Macquarie School of Education is committed to an academic, research-based approach to teacher education. At the core of Macquarie’s approach to teacher education is the concept of the scholar-teacher, one who is flexible, responsive to academic needs, reflective, open-minded, confident and adaptable.
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Do you have any questions about how you can apply for this Macquarie University scholarship? Email info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 to learn more!

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Macquarie University linguist elected Fellow of Academy of the Social Sciences

Macquarie University’s Distinguished Professor of Linguistics, Katherine Demuth, has been elected a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, following a peer vote.

Fellows are elected to the Academy on the basis of a distinguished contribution to one or more of the social sciences that has also been recognised internationally.

Macquarie Linguistics

Professor Katherine Demuth (Photo credit: Macquarie University)

“I am truly honoured to be joining others as a newly elected Fellow Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia,” said Professor Demuth on her achievement.

The Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia promotes excellence in the social sciences in Australia and in their contribution to public policy. It is the one of the four learned academies in Australia and focuses on promoting excellence in research in the social sciences and increasing public awareness of the role and value of social sciences.

Distinguished Professor Demuth is an Australian Laureate Fellow and CORE Professor in Linguistics and the Centre for Language Sciences at Macquarie University, where she is Director of the Child Language Lab and a Chief Investigator at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Cognition and its Disorders.

Katherine’s research focuses on discovering the mechanisms underlying child language acquisition and the implications this has for better understanding language development in bilinguals, those with hearing loss, and those with specific language impairment/language delay.

Professor Demuth will be formally welcomed to the Academy at the Fellows’ Dinner and Annual General Meeting on Nov. 17 & 18, 2015.

Macquarie University Department of Linguistics

The Macquarie Department of Linguistics is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

The strength of the department lies in its breadth of coverage of linguistics sub-disciplines, and it has particular strengths in the areas of systemic functional linguistics, speech and hearing and language teaching. It has long been recognized for its research and teaching in areas such as lexicography and corpus linguistics, in phonetics and phonology (especially as applied to computer-based research in speech technology and speech perception), and in communication disorders. The department has a strong interest in the description of modern English language, especially work in systemic-functional grammar, in discourse analysis and pragmatics and in Australian English.

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Would you like more information about studying linguistics at Macquarie University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

Teaching English as a second language

The Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

Macquarie University Linguistics

Study linguistics at Macquarie University! (Image: FJ Gaylor)

Interested in teaching English as a second language? Check out these programs from Macquarie:

Graduate Certificate of TESOL

The Graduate Certificate of TESOL is a course designed for prospective teachers wishing to teach English to speakers of other languages. The course prepares students for a variety of language teaching contexts in Australia and overseas. It integrates current theory and practice of TESOL, including teaching methodologies, programming and planning, and linguistics for language teaching. A range of language learners is considered, varying by age, social and cultural backgrounds.

Key benefits

  • Qualified teachers obtain a recognised EAL specialisation.
  • New teachers are qualified to teach in a range of language learning institutions.
  • The program includes an integrated professional experience unit involving a teaching practicum in a school or simulated school setting.
  • All course units may be taken in on-campus blended mode and/or online mode.
  • The course provides a pathway to further study in Applied Linguistics and TESOL.
  • All teaching staff are qualified TESOL instructors with wide ranging teaching experience and are actively researching areas of TESOL and Applied Linguistics.

Master of Applied Linguistics and TESOL

The Master of Applied Linguistics and TESOL covers theoretical and methodological issues relevant to practitioners in a variety of professions whose work is concerned with applied language study. It is internationally relevant and focuses on the development of analytic skills and understanding the complex relationship between language use and context, and research in these areas. The degree is designed to allow candidates to study a broad range of topics within the area of Applied Linguistics. In particular, the degree has been designed to provide a strong theoretical and practical foundation in the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language. Much of the content of the program is also relevant to teachers of other languages.

Key benefits

  • Allows you the opportunity to study with one of the largest and most diverse Linguistics departments in Australia, which features four research centres
  • Offers flexible study options allowing you to study on-campus, distance (online), or mixed
  • Provides an internationally relevant and highly regarded qualification

This program is suitable if you are an experienced language professional, working or aiming to work in the areas of teaching, curriculum development, literacy education assessment and program evaluation, bilingualism, teacher education, policy development, management, or a community service where language and communication are critical issues.

Apply to a linguistics program at Macquarie University!

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Are you interested in linguistics and translating and interpreting degrees at Macquarie University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Macquarie subjects in world’s top 100

Macquarie University is among the world’s elite institutions in 21 of the 36 subjects featured in this year’s QS World University Rankings by Subject, published today. Nine of these subject areas at Macquarie were considered to be in the world’s top 100:

Macquarie University Linguistics School

Study linguistics at Macquarie University

For this fifth edition of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, QS evaluated 3,551 universities, qualifed 2,186, and ranked 894 institutions in total. More than 100 million citations attributions were analysed and QS verified the provision of over 14,000 programs.

The methodology combines analysis from QS Global Employer and Academic Surveys with bibliometric data from Elsevier’s Scopus database.

About Macquarie University’s Department of Linguistics

The Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

The strength of the department lies in its breadth of coverage of linguistics sub-disciplines, and it has particular strengths in the areas of systemic functional linguistics, speech and hearing and language teaching. It has long been recognized for its research and teaching in areas such as lexicography and corpus linguistics, in phonetics and phonology (especially as applied to computer-based research in speech technology and speech perception), and in communication disorders. The department has a strong interest in the description of modern English language, especially work in systemic-functional grammar, in discourse analysis and pragmatics and in Australian English.

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Would you like more information about studying linguistics at Macquarie University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Macquarie Master of Advanced Translation and Interpreting Studies

Ranked among the top 50 universities in the world for linguistics in the QS World University Rankings 2014, Macquarie University offers one of the best translating and interpreting courses in Australia. Unlike traditional courses, Macquarie’s programs place particular emphasis on acquiring the professional skills, knowledge and experience valued by employers.

The difference between a translator and an interpreter

A translator focuses on written communication while an interpreter delivers the verbal interpretation or Auslan signing at conferences, community or diplomatic meetings. Macquarie’s programs are designed to meet the needs of students and the requirements of a globalized translating and interpreting industry.

Suitable for

The Master of Advanced Translation and Interpreting Studies at Macquarie is suitable for proficient bilinguals interested in becoming a professional translator or interpreter with a more specialised focus. Also suitable for current translators and interpreters to further develop specialised translating and interpreting skills through a master’s degree. This degree is particularly suitable for candidates with a stronger interest in independent research.  Working languages for practical units are Chinese (Mandarin), Korean, Japanese, Spanish, and other languages depending on demand.

How to be a professional translator and interpreter

Translators and interpreters are recognised professionals. To acquire exceptional skills and knowledge, it is essential that you not only gain sufficient practical experience but also acquire adequate knowledge of the mechanisms underlying translating and interpreting practice. The programs are part of Macquarie University‘s world-renowned Department of Linguistics, and provides professional training and academic knowledge in T&I. By integrating such mechanisms and practice into the university’s programs, you will be given the tools to analyse your own translations and interpretations in a more objective way; to acquire domain-specific knowledge in a wide range of areas; and to communicate with clients in an appropriate manner.

Career Opportunities

Graduates will be well prepared to pursue a career as professional translators and interpreters in a range of settings, including community translation and interpreting (e.g., governments, courts, tribunals, police, clinics and hospitals); international conferences (primarily conference interpreting); business (e.g., business meetings, internal and external documents and contracts); industry products (e.g., manuals, localization); regional and international events (e.g., Olympics and Paralympics); broadcasting and publishing.

Master of Advanced Translation and Interpreting Studies

The Master of Advanced Translation and Interpreting Studies teaches proficient bilinguals the skills and knowledge to work as professional translators and interpreters in specialised contexts. The program focuses on the acquisition of theoretical knowledge relevant to translating and interpreting practice and their application in professional practice. Students are also required to design and implement an extensive research project and execute practicum projects with our industry partners in a variety of settings.

Program: Master of Advanced Translation and Interpreting Studies
Location: North Ryde, Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years

Apply to the Master of Advanced Translation and Interpreting Studies!

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Are you interested in linguistics and translating and interpreting degrees at Macquarie University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

Macquarie linguistics PhD candidate to attend 2014 Australia-China Youth Dialogue

Macquarie Linguistics PhD candidate Alexandra Grey has been selected from 200 young Australian professionals, entrepreneurs, and students, to attend the 2014 Australia-China Youth Dialogue, a youth-driven bilateral conference to take place this November in Beijing.

Macquarie University Linguistics School

Macquarie University Spatial Experience

After being shortlisted following her written application in July, and finally selected after an interview in September, Alex and a small number of emerging Australian leaders will spend four days meeting with young Chinese counterparts and a series of established diplomatic, corporate, academic and civil society leaders from both countries.

“The ACYD’s invited speakers are diplomatic, business and academic leaders I would not have access to otherwise. To be able to speak with them in small groups during workshops is bound to be thought provoking,” said Alex.

“I am especially looking forward to learning from the other young Australian and Chinese delegates, because they come from such an array of specialties. It’s not just cross-disciplinary, but cutting across all kinds of sectors and fields of experience.”

The group will discuss key aspects of the Australia-China relationship over a program of seminars and workshops on energy and climate change; global health and food safety risks; China, Africa and economic development; China, Australia and the USA’s international relations; security and crises; governance; art and cultural exchange; philanthropy; and entrepreneurship.

Alex’s doctoral research focuses on China’s ethnic minorities and their languages, supervised by Professor Ingrid Piller from the Macquarie Department of Linguistics. Alex lived, worked, studied and travelled in China from 2010–2013, and recently visited eight provinces for her PhD field work. She conducts her field work interviews in Mandarin, which she started studying in her lunch breaks at work six years ago.

Before commencing her PhD at Macquarie University, Alex was an Australian Youth Ambassador for Development, working at a public interest law NGO called Beijing Yilian Legal Aid and Study Center for Labor. She has also taught debate and critical thinking at Beijing Foreign Studies University, adjudicated many debate tournaments in China, and received a China Scholarship Council scholarship to study Mandarin in Beijing. A graduate of Beijing Language and Culture University and Tsinghua University, she also writes for whydev.org and the blogs The China Beat and Language on the Move.

“My interests are in higher education and the NGO sector, and also in policy-making relating to those areas. I plan to be a well informed and bi-cultural and to use the insights from ACYD in these areas after I finish my PhD,” the Macquarie Linguistics PhD candidate said.

“Australia benefits from having people with an interest and an in-depth, reality-based understanding of China. We also benefit if China has an increasingly clear understanding of Australia. I think person-to-person diplomacy and continuing exchanges of ideas are especially powerful vehicles for this.”

In addition to her doctoral studies, Alex is a tutor for a course on governance and Australian policy-making at Macquarie Law School. She represented Macquarie at the G20 Youth Forum earlier this year, adding to her extensive and varied experience that saw her selected for the 2014  Australia-China Youth Dialogue.

About the Macquarie University Department of Linguistics

The Macquarie Department of Linguistics is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

The strength of the department lies in its breadth of coverage of linguistics sub-disciplines, and it has particular strengths in the areas of systemic functional linguistics, speech and hearing and language teaching. It has long been recognized for its research and teaching in areas such as lexicography and corpus linguistics, in phonetics and phonology (especially as applied to computer-based research in speech technology and speech perception), and in communication disorders. The department has a strong interest in the description of modern English language, especially work in systemic-functional grammar, in discourse analysis and pragmatics and in Australian English.

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Would you like more information about studying linguistics at Macquarie University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Friday, April 11th, 2014

Why study linguistics?

What is Linguistics?

Generally speaking, linguistics is defined as the scientific study of language and its structure, including the study of morphology, syntax, phonetics, and semantics. Specific branches of linguistics include sociolinguistics, dialectology, psycholinguistics, computational linguistics, historical-comparative linguistics, and applied linguistics.

Macquarie University Linguistics School

Study at Macquarie University, Sydney

Macquarie University has the largest and most diverse Department of Linguistics in Australia, and many would say internationally. Linguistics at Macquarie focuses on the study of language and its uses and applications in society. It aims to make connections between theoretical, descriptive and applied studies which address problems and issues in human communication. Applied Linguistics has close relationships with other disciplines in the university which have a concern for language and language in use, such as English, anthropology, sociology, psychology, mass communication, modern languages, education, physics, information technology, biology, computing, law, philosophy and management.

Why should you study linguistics?

Linguistics lies across the traditional boundaries of humanities, science, technology and social science since language is a general human asset developed and used by all people in all activities.

As a discipline, linguistics has two main objectives:

  1. the systematic and analytic study of language itself as our most characteristic and valuable human asset; and
  2. the study of how humans make use of language in a wide range of contexts as they manage their complex social behaviours and interactions.

Thinking about language and language in use compels us to face to questions such as

  • What do we unconsciously know about language?
  • How can we learn to talk about it?
  • How does language reveal ourselves to ourselves and to others?
  • How can we learn to be critical about our linguistic beliefs and prejudices?
  • Why do some languages thrive and other languages die out?
  • Can anyone learn any language?

These are just some of the questions that interest linguists. Macquarie University aims to enable students to talk and write about language, and challenge some of those prejudices about language and its use that make life difficult for so many.

Some linguistics degrees at Macquarie

  • Master of Applied Linguistics
  • Master of Applied Linguistics with a specialisation in General Applied Linguistics
  • Master of Applied Linguistics with a specialisation in TESOL

Apply to Macquarie University Linguistics School!

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Are you interested in linguistics at Macquarie University or at other Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Macquarie University Department of Linguistics

The Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University is one of the largest and most diverse linguistics departments in Australia, and possibly one of the largest and most diverse departments internationally. The department hosts various research centres, clinical groups, and other research groups, which collaboratively foster a dynamic and interdisciplinary teaching and research environment. Teaching and research within the department extends across five distinct, yet interrelated, disciplinary areas:

The department is particularly proud to be home to a Macquarie University Research Centre, the Centre for Language Sciences (CLaS). Alongside the Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science (MACCS), CLaS has members in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Cognition and its Disorders. The Centre of Excellence is funded for 7 years from 2011, and is directed by Professor Stephen Crain. There are several other active research centres within the department, including the Centre for Language in Social Life (CLSL), the Applied Linguistics and Language in Education Research Centre (ALLERC) and the Centre for Translation and Interpreting Research (CTIR), which includes sign language interpreting. The department prides itself on being the world’s leading institution for research in Auslan, the Australian sign language.

A leading audiology section in the department has been crucial in ensuring Macquarie University’s central involvement as one of five core parties in the HEARing Co-operative Research Centre (CRC). Our two clinics, an audiology clinic and a speech and language pathology clinic, provide services to the community as well as placement opportunities for students.

Macquarie Audiology School

The Master of Clinical Audiology at Macquarie University is dedicated to preparing students to become professional audiologists. The university’s audiology program provides supervised clinical placements to hone its students’ professional skills. As well, numerous modules of scientific coursework allow students to learn the scientific fundamentals of audiology and understand the processes that contribute to congenital or acquired hearing loss and vestibular dysfunctions.

Macquarie Speech Pathology School

The Master of Speech and Language Pathology (MSLP) at Macquarie University began in 2001. It prepares graduates for the profession of speech pathology, enabling them to work clinically with individuals with developmental or acquired communication disorders. The program enables individuals who have completed a bachelor’s degree in a related field to qualify as speech pathologists in two years and obtain a master’s degree.

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Would you like more information about studying audiology or speech pathology at Macquarie University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Interested in linguistics? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

Macquarie Linguistics workshop explores the origins of language

A unique workshop brought internationally leading linguists, philosophers and cognitive scientists to Macquarie University on Friday Dec. 6 to discuss a centuries-old question: Where did language come from?

Macquarie University Linguistics School

Study linguistics at Macquarie (Image credit: FJ Gaylor)

In a cross-faculty workshop, experts including Professor Bob Berwick, (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Professor Kim Sterelny, (Australian National University), Emeritus Professor Brian Byrne, (University of New England), Associate Professor Drew Khlentzos, (University of New England) and Dr Richard Menary, (Macquarie University) shared their views.

“The Linguistic Society of Paris actually banned debate on the subject of language evolution in 1866,” says Distinguished Professor Stephen Crain, director of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) and workshop organizer.

This was perhaps due to the appearance of speculative theories on the origins of spoken language. Several of these were recounted by the historian Max Müller:

  • The Bow-wow (aka Cuckoo) theory proposed that early words were imitations of the cries of beasts and birds.
  • The Poop-pooh theory maintained that first words were emotional interjections triggered by pleasure or pain.
  • The Yo-he-ho theory suggested that language developed to synchronize muscular effort by alternating sounds such as “heave” with sounds such as “ho.”

“In modern times, two more scientific approaches to the origins of language have gained prominence,” says Crain. “One is a gradualist approach, which explains the emergence of language using the same kinds of adaptive (Darwinian) mechanisms that are known to shape other traits.

“The second approach has reached the opposite conclusion—that language emerged in the species due to a single, chance genetic micromutation.”

The workshop was devoted to an in-depth discussion of these alternative approaches to the origins of language, including the following:

  • What is language?
  • What aspects of language are unique to humans?
  • How is language represented in the brain?
  • What function, if any, does language serve?
  • Did language evolve gradually or was its evolution a ‘sudden emergent event’?
  • Is there a gestural origin to language?
  • What is the relationship between logic and language?

About Macquarie University’s Department of Linguistics

The Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

The strength of the department lies in its breadth of coverage of linguistics sub-disciplines, and it has particular strengths in the areas of systemic functional linguistics, speech and hearing and language teaching. It has long been recognized for its research and teaching in areas such as lexicography and corpus linguistics, in phonetics and phonology (especially as applied to computer-based research in speech technology and speech perception), and in communication disorders. The department has a strong interest in the description of modern English language, especially work in systemic-functional grammar, in discourse analysis and pragmatics and in Australian English.

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Would you like more information about studying linguistics at Macquarie University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.