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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Linguistics Programs’

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

UQ linguists study Northern Australia’s new languages

University of Queensland linguists will join Aboriginal language experts in Katherine in the Northern Territory next week to workshop Australia’s largest newly adopted language—Kriol.

The UQ School of Languages and Cultures researcher Dr Greg Dickson said Kriol was now the second most commonly spoken language in the Northern Territory, along with new languages such as Light Warlpiri and Gurindji Kriol.

Dr Dickson said he was excited to be taking linguistic research out of universities and into relevant local regions.

UQ linguists study Northern Australia’s new languages

Two young men in Minyerri (faces not shown) participating in a UQ research project (looking at dialectal variation in Kriol) (Photo credit: UQ)

“This will allow participants to share what they are working on, contribute to different projects, and gain skills and knowledge of a growing language that’s now a significant part of Australia’s rich linguistic fabric,” he said.

UQ’s Dr Felicity Meakins said Kriol was not a traditional Indigenous language, but it was spoken across much of northern Australia.

“Indigenous youth in many areas of northern and central Australia are creating new languages which combine sounds, words and grammar from traditional languages and Indigenous English varieties,” she said.

Dr Dickson said linguists estimated there were about 20,000 Kriol speakers.

“Kriol is now even a language of Shakespeare with the critically acclaimed King Lear adaption The Shadow King being partially translated into Kriol by Aboriginal actor and musician Tom E. Lewis,” he said.

Dr Meakins said Kriol had gone from an unnamed creole language to a language interpreted widely and used in government, education, liturgy, stage and popular music in the space of 50 years.

“For policymakers, particularly in education, new Indigenous languages have largely gone under the radar,” she said.

“Yet a knowledge of them is important to tailoring educational programs which take into account the first language of a student.”

The workshop will be held at the Charles Darwin University Rural Campus in Katherine from June 6 to 10, along with academic, research and professional sessions.

About the UQ School of Languages and Cultures

The UQ School of Languages and Cultures specialises in teaching and research in major world languages and cultures. It is one of the largest Schools of language instruction in Australia with 50 full-time academic staff. The school is committed to the highest standards of teaching and research in languages, the cultures in which they are spoken, in linguistics and applied linguistics and in translating and interpreting.

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Would you like more information about linguistics and language studies at UQ? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

Master of Applied Linguistics at the University of Melbourne

Linguistics at the University of Melbourne is ranked No. 1 in Australia and No. 13 in the world in the 2016 QS World Rankings by Subject.

The Master of Applied Linguistics offers theoretical and practical training to give you the competitive edge to build your graduate career in language teaching, language assessment, language program evaluation and beyond. It is designed to boost your professional knowledge and sharpen your vocational skills in a wide range of areas.

Students may focus on one of 5 specialisations:

  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • Technology and language learning
  • Language testing
  • English language
  • Modern languages

New Stream: Modern Languages

The Master of Applied Linguistics now has a Modern Languages stream. This includes a range of subjects that focus specifically on developing language skills and cultural competency in modern languages at the graduate level. Languages include French, German, Italian, Spanish, Indonesian, Chinese, Japanese, and Arabic! This exciting new addition to an innovative program welcomes professionals working with modern languages in education, translating, trade relations, diplomacy, the public service, international public relations and related areas.

Students of the Master of Applied Linguistics will have the opportunity to

  • acquire advanced level understanding of current issues, concepts and research methods in targeted areas of chosen discipline; and
  • complete the Minor Thesis elective to activate a pathway to a PhD.

Program: Master of Applied Linguistics
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 1–2 years (dependent upon candidate’s background)
Semester intake: March

Entry requirements

  • An undergraduate degree or equivalent, with an average of 70% or above.

Apply to the University of Melbourne linguistics program!

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Find out more about studying linguistics at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at 1-866-698-7355 or shannon@oztrekk.com.

 

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Macquarie University international scholarships

What does the Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship cover?

Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship is a partial scholarship for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, the amount is varied up to AUD$10,000 and it will be applied towards your tuition fee.

Macquarie University

Study at Macquarie University

Priority areas: Engineering, Environment, Human Science, Media, Linguistics, and Education.

Application Deadline – June 29, 2016

The Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarships do not provide financial support in the form of a living allowance, nor does it provide for the cost of visa application, Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC), airfares, accommodation, conferences or other costs associated with study.

The Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship is a single scholarship and not available to be renewed. Please note that applicants can only receive one scholarship.

Applicants applying for the Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship will not be required to submit a referee’s report or a statement of purpose. Once you have completed the online scholarship application form, a confirmation email will be sent to you at your nominated email address. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Environment

Degree: Master of Environment (Environmental Management)
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

The Master of Environment offers an interdisciplinary approach to environmental management. A major focus of the degree is to teach you how to work with people from different disciplinary perspectives in order to find environmental solutions.

You will study areas such as

  • sustainable development;
  • environmental decision making;
  • environmental management and analysis; and
  • environmental law.

Engineering

Degree: Master of Engineering
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

The program covers key areas of professional electronics engineering systems design, delivery and management, including:

  • Very Large Scale Integration Algorithms and Systems
  • High Performance Integrated Circuit Design
  • Reconfigured Electronics
  • Telecommunications Performance Analysis
  • Hetrogeneous Networks, Theory and Practice

Linguistics

Degree: Master of Applied Linguistics
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

It is internationally relevant and focuses on the development of analytic skills and understanding the complex relationship between language use and context, and research in these areas. The degree is designed to allow candidates to study a broad range of topics within the area of Applied Linguistics. In particular, the degree has been designed to provide a strong theoretical and practical foundation in the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language.

Education

Degree: Bachelor of Education (Primary or Secondary)
Duration: 2 years full time
Semester intake: February

The Macquarie School of Education is committed to an academic, research-based approach to teacher education. At the core of Macquarie’s approach to teacher education is the concept of the scholar-teacher, one who is flexible, responsive to academic needs, reflective, open-minded, confident and adaptable.
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Do you have any questions about how you can apply for this Macquarie University scholarship? Email info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 to learn more!

Friday, January 29th, 2016

Study applied linguistics at the University of Queensland

Linguistics—the scientific study of language—explores how humans communicate by examining the relationships between structure, meaning and context. By studying linguistics at the University of Queensland, you’ll discover how we learn language and use it, change it, share it. You’ll also analyse the social and historical contexts in which various languages are or have been spoken, to understand what distinguishes each language from another. These courses encourage you to develop a deeper understanding of how sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax), signs (semiotics) and meaning (semantics) can create or confound communication success.

Study applied linguistics at UQ

Study applied linguistics at the University of Queensland

Why study Applied Linguistics?

Applied linguistics provides a strong understanding of concepts, current issues and research methods in the core areas of applied linguistics. Students will acquire specialised knowledge of theory and practice in targeted areas of language teaching, technology, and sociolinguistics/ intercultural issues. While studying applied linguistics, students will develop an ability to apply their knowledge to professional and practical tasks in teaching and other areas and an understanding of principal directions in current thinking and applications of the field.

What can you do with a degree in linguistics?

  • Writer
  • Publisher
  • Journalist
  • Lexicographer
  • Consultant
  • Copy writer

Program: Master of Applied Linguistics
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: February and July
Application deadline: May 31 and November 30 each year

Entry requirements

  • Approved degree in the same discipline with a GPA of 4.5; or
  • GCAppLing or GDipAppLing with a GPA of 4.5; or
  • Approved degree in any discipline with a GPA of 4.5 and a minimum of two years language teaching experience.

Apply to a University of Queensland linguistics program!

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Are you interested in studying applied linguistics at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at 1-866-698-7355 or shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, October 16th, 2015

Sydney professor’s breakthrough research in linguistics wins award

Professor Nick Enfield’s co-authored study proving ‘huh’ is a universal word has won an Ig Nobel Prize and been published by PLOS ONE.

Professor Nick Enfield of the University of Sydney has won an Ig Nobel Prize for breakthrough research in linguistics that found evidence of a universal trait in human conversation.

Professor Nick Enfield (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The Ig Nobel Prizes are organised by the magazine Annals of Improbable Research and are awarded annually at Harvard University in honour of research achievements that “make people laugh, and then think.”

The prizes were first established as a tongue-in-cheek alternative to the Nobels. But the awards, now in their 25th year, have gained their own prestige within the scientific community, with each individual ‘Ig’ presented to winners by a Nobel Laureate.

Professor Enfield and his co-authors Dr Mark Dingemanse and Dr Francisco Torreira of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands were recognised for their 2013 PLOS ONE paper revealing ‘Huh’ is a universal word.

In a major cross-linguistic study, they sampled 31 languages and found all have a word with a near-identical sound and function as ‘Huh’ in the English language; evidence, they proposed, that ‘Huh’ is an indispensable tool in human communication.

“We are delighted that our research has been recognised with an Ig Nobel Prize, because it lives up to the awards’ mission to celebrate research that first makes people laugh and then think. It’s fitting because misunderstandings themselves can so often do this,” said Professor Enfield, Chair of the University of Sydney Department of Linguistics.

Professor Enfield and Dr Dingemanse have followed up their Ig Nobel-winning research with the publication of a new PLOS ONE paper, which suggests humans ‘fix’ misunderstandings in conversation on average every 90 seconds – regardless of the language being spoken.

“The findings give insight into what is special about language in our species,” said Professor Enfield.

Building on their 2013 ‘Huh’ study, an international team of linguists scoured over 48 hours of conversation in 12 different languages spoken across five continents and found in each language the speakers share the same basic system for ‘fixing’ misunderstanding.

Three talking points on human communication:

  1. ‘Huh’ and its variants appear in 31 languages
  2. People stop for clarification in conversation once every 90 seconds
  3. People share the burden of fixing misunderstanding in conversation

Efforts to fix misunderstanding in conversation can be as simple as the word ‘Huh’ or a question such as ‘Who?’ And on average, no five minutes of conversation go by in any language without someone attempting to fix a misunderstanding.

The researchers studied the Aboriginal language of Murrinh-Patha in Northern Australia, Mandarin Chinese in Taiwan, Argentine Sign Language, and Siwu in Ghana, among others. The findings suggest that the universal foundations of language are in human social cognition.

“We humans excel at monitoring each others’ states of understanding, and we are masters of the kind of cooperation and collaboration that mutual understanding requires,” said Professor Enfield.

Language scientists have historically laboured over the study of conversation, but the research of Professor Enfield and his colleagues provide further evidence for a long sought-after finding: a universal principle in how humans communicate in conversation.

“Our findings could help computers to communicate in more ‘human’ ways, for instance when they don’t understand voice commands. They also have applications in language teaching and cross-cultural communication: knowing how and when to use these tools can help people to secure mutual understanding quickly and effectively,” said lead author of the PLOS ONE paper, Dr Dingemanse.

The research is part of a five-year European Research Council (ERC) project led by Professor Enfield.

Study linguistics at the University of Sydney

Do you love teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), second language teaching (SLT), and the teaching of modern languages? The Master of Applied Linguistics trains you to apply your knowledge of language in diverse settings, including teaching, translation, journalism and media, language policy and planning, website design and socio-educational development.

Master of Applied Linguistics students will engage with international experts in the fields of functional linguistics, world English, language and culture and media discourse; and will attend seminars on a range of applications of linguistics, including educational linguistics, TESOL, clinical linguistics, forensic linguistics, and translation and interpreting.

Students will also have access the “Sydney School,” a groundbreaking and internationally recognised literacy initiative in primary, secondary, tertiary and adult education, designed and implemented by specialist linguists and educators.

Program: Master of Applied Linguistics
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years
Semester intake: March
Application deadline: January 31, 2016; however, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to a linguistics or language program at the University of Sydney!

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Get more information about studying linguistics and language studies University of Sydney! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Macquarie University linguist elected Fellow of Academy of the Social Sciences

Macquarie University’s Distinguished Professor of Linguistics, Katherine Demuth, has been elected a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, following a peer vote.

Fellows are elected to the Academy on the basis of a distinguished contribution to one or more of the social sciences that has also been recognised internationally.

Macquarie Linguistics

Professor Katherine Demuth (Photo credit: Macquarie University)

“I am truly honoured to be joining others as a newly elected Fellow Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia,” said Professor Demuth on her achievement.

The Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia promotes excellence in the social sciences in Australia and in their contribution to public policy. It is the one of the four learned academies in Australia and focuses on promoting excellence in research in the social sciences and increasing public awareness of the role and value of social sciences.

Distinguished Professor Demuth is an Australian Laureate Fellow and CORE Professor in Linguistics and the Centre for Language Sciences at Macquarie University, where she is Director of the Child Language Lab and a Chief Investigator at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Cognition and its Disorders.

Katherine’s research focuses on discovering the mechanisms underlying child language acquisition and the implications this has for better understanding language development in bilinguals, those with hearing loss, and those with specific language impairment/language delay.

Professor Demuth will be formally welcomed to the Academy at the Fellows’ Dinner and Annual General Meeting on Nov. 17 & 18, 2015.

Macquarie University Department of Linguistics

The Macquarie Department of Linguistics is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

The strength of the department lies in its breadth of coverage of linguistics sub-disciplines, and it has particular strengths in the areas of systemic functional linguistics, speech and hearing and language teaching. It has long been recognized for its research and teaching in areas such as lexicography and corpus linguistics, in phonetics and phonology (especially as applied to computer-based research in speech technology and speech perception), and in communication disorders. The department has a strong interest in the description of modern English language, especially work in systemic-functional grammar, in discourse analysis and pragmatics and in Australian English.

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Would you like more information about studying linguistics at Macquarie University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, September 18th, 2015

Griffith PhD candidate studies the art of offending well

Nathaniel is a Griffith University PhD candidate and conversation analysis researcher. He is researching how people show they are offended and how they hold people accountable when they are offended:

Griffith University Languages and Linguisitics

PhD candidate Nathaniel Mitchell (Photo credit: Griffith University)

In my research, I’ve identified many of the nuances that come into play when people are dealing with impoliteness.

In our culture, knowing when and how it is appropriate to be offensive can be more valuable than knowing when to be ‘polite’. The use of email and social media comments has opened up avenues of expression that might be different from face-to-face communication. In my data, close friends email a lot, but they tend to say very little. Instead, they tease, mock and insult each other in order to show friendship. But it is clear that receiving teases, mockery and insults is more important than giving it.

In order to insult each other, these emailers have found new ways around their workplace filters. They do this through wordplay, emoticons, and purposeful misspellings in order to perform different types of “jocular mockery (insulting but not meaning offence).”

This data raised the question, how do they know when each other are just playing a game, and how do they know when it’s serious? The answer, they’re never serious. If someone gets offended, then it’s their problem. Yet, society at large simply cannot work this way. So how can they accomplish this perpetual non-seriousness?

Interestingly, recent research has found that Australians tend to make fun of people within the first 10 seconds of meeting them. Yet is it clearly not just an Australian thing. Scottish, Irish, New Zealanders, and some English do it too (as far as the research suggests).

So this means strangers in Australia might be teasing each other before they have even introduced themselves.

What I’m finding is that even though most people learn manners and the concept of politeness from their society (parents, teachers, leaders and peers), politeness may, in actuality, be a hindrance in our social interactions. It seems MORE important to know how to be impolite. You need to know when others are doing it, what it might look like, and most importantly how to respond, even when it looks like they are actually being rude. This extends from emailing, to face to face communication and onto social media platforms as well.

In fact, there is social currency in being rude when you do it right. Provided you do it right, being ‘rude’ can display wit and high-level communications skills.

Understanding how impoliteness works, how people deal with being offended, and how people treat mockery is a key finding in the search for “being Australian”. Perhaps teaching students that mockery is not always insulting might be more socially advantageous than teaching them to only be polite.

About the Griffith School of Languages and Linguistics

The Griffith School of Languages and Linguistics emphasises linking language, culture and communication; career-oriented outcomes both locally and globally; best-practice language teaching methodologies and technologies; and integrating language learning with linguistics, the scientific study of language.

Linguistics is the science behind the nature and function of language and how it is used in society. Knowing how languages are developed and used will help you gain a solid understanding of your chosen language.

Linguistics makes your study more useful:

  • Gain a deeper knowledge of languages and cultures.
  • Greater understanding of how languages work.
  • Prepare yourself for real world challenges and a global career.
  • Communicate effectively in many settings and situations.

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Learn more about arts degrees available at Griffith University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, June 8th, 2015

Master of Applied Linguistics at Monash University

The Master of Applied Linguistics broadens your knowledge of how language works in the context of globalisation, with opportunities for research and internships. Applied linguistics has become widely recognised for its ability to solve language-related problems at both the micro and macro levels.

Monash University‘s multilingual and multicultural classes stimulate lively discussion about the differences between languages and language-learning experiences, and how these relate to the theories and issues covered in the unit. Classes are taught by leading scholars in their field. Monash is renowned for its expertise in Japanese applied linguistics, as well as Australian and Austronesian languages.

Applied linguistics at Monash has an international reputation for producing top graduates, particularly in the areas of Japanese applied linguistics, English as an international language, and the study of multilingualism more broadly. Graduates work in mono- and multi-lingual settings, with careers as language teachers, language-education and assessment experts, speech pathologists, interpreters and translators. They work in industries where language and communication are crucial; for example, in the health areas of speech therapy and speech pathology, or in the engineering or computational fields related to language and speech technology, such as speech recognition and synthesis.

Program: Master of Applied Linguistics
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 1/1.5/2 years (depending on candidate’s background)
Semester intake: February or July each year

Apply to the Master of Applied Linguistics at Monash University!

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Get more information about studying linguistics and language studies at Monash University! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

Teaching English as a second language

The Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

Macquarie University Linguistics

Study linguistics at Macquarie University! (Image: FJ Gaylor)

Interested in teaching English as a second language? Check out these programs from Macquarie:

Graduate Certificate of TESOL

The Graduate Certificate of TESOL is a course designed for prospective teachers wishing to teach English to speakers of other languages. The course prepares students for a variety of language teaching contexts in Australia and overseas. It integrates current theory and practice of TESOL, including teaching methodologies, programming and planning, and linguistics for language teaching. A range of language learners is considered, varying by age, social and cultural backgrounds.

Key benefits

  • Qualified teachers obtain a recognised EAL specialisation.
  • New teachers are qualified to teach in a range of language learning institutions.
  • The program includes an integrated professional experience unit involving a teaching practicum in a school or simulated school setting.
  • All course units may be taken in on-campus blended mode and/or online mode.
  • The course provides a pathway to further study in Applied Linguistics and TESOL.
  • All teaching staff are qualified TESOL instructors with wide ranging teaching experience and are actively researching areas of TESOL and Applied Linguistics.

Master of Applied Linguistics and TESOL

The Master of Applied Linguistics and TESOL covers theoretical and methodological issues relevant to practitioners in a variety of professions whose work is concerned with applied language study. It is internationally relevant and focuses on the development of analytic skills and understanding the complex relationship between language use and context, and research in these areas. The degree is designed to allow candidates to study a broad range of topics within the area of Applied Linguistics. In particular, the degree has been designed to provide a strong theoretical and practical foundation in the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language. Much of the content of the program is also relevant to teachers of other languages.

Key benefits

  • Allows you the opportunity to study with one of the largest and most diverse Linguistics departments in Australia, which features four research centres
  • Offers flexible study options allowing you to study on-campus, distance (online), or mixed
  • Provides an internationally relevant and highly regarded qualification

This program is suitable if you are an experienced language professional, working or aiming to work in the areas of teaching, curriculum development, literacy education assessment and program evaluation, bilingualism, teacher education, policy development, management, or a community service where language and communication are critical issues.

Apply to a linguistics program at Macquarie University!

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Are you interested in linguistics and translating and interpreting degrees at Macquarie University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Macquarie subjects in world’s top 100

Macquarie University is among the world’s elite institutions in 21 of the 36 subjects featured in this year’s QS World University Rankings by Subject, published today. Nine of these subject areas at Macquarie were considered to be in the world’s top 100:

Macquarie University Linguistics School

Study linguistics at Macquarie University

For this fifth edition of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, QS evaluated 3,551 universities, qualifed 2,186, and ranked 894 institutions in total. More than 100 million citations attributions were analysed and QS verified the provision of over 14,000 programs.

The methodology combines analysis from QS Global Employer and Academic Surveys with bibliometric data from Elsevier’s Scopus database.

About Macquarie University’s Department of Linguistics

The Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University is the largest of its kind in Australia, which includes substantial postgraduate programs, a full undergraduate program, more than 900 postgraduate coursework students, nearly 100 research students and four research centres of international standing.

The strength of the department lies in its breadth of coverage of linguistics sub-disciplines, and it has particular strengths in the areas of systemic functional linguistics, speech and hearing and language teaching. It has long been recognized for its research and teaching in areas such as lexicography and corpus linguistics, in phonetics and phonology (especially as applied to computer-based research in speech technology and speech perception), and in communication disorders. The department has a strong interest in the description of modern English language, especially work in systemic-functional grammar, in discourse analysis and pragmatics and in Australian English.

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Would you like more information about studying linguistics at Macquarie University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.