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Articles categorized as ‘University of Queensland Law School’

Monday, May 15th, 2017

It’s National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 15 – 19. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state. A range of exciting and interactive activities are being held around Australia celebrate Law Week, including courthouse tours, mock trials and student competitions.

It's National Law Week in Australia

Find out how you can study at an Australian law school (Photo: Bond University)

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid, and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week’s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed for the whole community to enjoy. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian law schools.

Australian Law Schools are a popular option for Canadian students wishing to attain qualifications to practice law.

But how do you know which degree to take—the LLB or the JD? It’s a question we receive a lot here at the OzTREKK office. Just what is the difference between the Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor? Although we’ve covered the topic before, with so many new applicants, we felt it was important to have another look and answer some other common questions we receive.

What is the difference between the LLB and the JD?

The Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor are both professionally recognized degrees. Both LLB and JD programs educate students to practice law and allow them to apply for registration in Canada. The main difference is that the LLB is offered at the undergraduate level, and the JD is offered at the postgraduate level. LLB students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies, while the JD or graduate-entry LLB requires a completed bachelor degree for admission.

At some Australian law schools, JD programs are fast-tracked, so that you can complete them in two calendar years, as opposed to a three-year, graduate-entry LLB. Entry requirements for JD programs can be more competitive, especially as they become more popular with North American students. At universities where both a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Laws are offered, students who have already completed an undergraduate degree normally apply for the postgraduate professional qualification (JD).

After I graduate, what do I have to do in order to be eligible to practice law in Canada?

An assessment based on your academic and professional profile is done before you may apply for admission to a law society in a Canadian common law jurisdiction. Once a file is assessed by the National Committee on Accreditation (NCA), you may be asked to complete one or more exams and/or attend and complete specific law school courses within a prescribed time frame. Upon successful completion of these requirements, the NCA issues a Certificate of Qualification. The certificate will state that you have education and training equivalent to that of a graduate from a Canadian law school.

How can I take the examinations in Canadian law?

There are two ways of taking these examinations if they have not been taken as part of an Australian Law School degree. Once an assessment is complete, you may either complete assigned subjects with NCA “challenge exams” or complete assigned subjects at law school.

The more popular route for Canadians is the challenge exams.

NCA assessments focus on the competence of applicants in core common law subjects, including four Canadian subjects which are mandatory for all applicants:

  • Principles of Canadian Administrative Law
  • Canadian Constitutional Law
  • Canadian Criminal Law and Procedure
  • Foundations of Canadian Law

A syllabus and sample exam are available for each subject.

How much difference is there between Australian and Canadian law?

The principles and methodology of Australian and Canadian law are similar. The details of statutory provisions and case-law obviously differ, but an Australian law degree provides a good basis for taking examinations in Canadian law and for legal practice in Canada.

Will I be able to practice law in Australia?

These are two separate issues: qualification as an Australian lawyer and possession of a visa entitling you to work in Australia. Admission to the legal profession in Australia requires—depending on the state—the completion of either articles or a six-month Practical Legal Training program. Australian immigration operates on a “points” system for working visas. Some points are awarded for having an Australian degree, but additional points are required. Some of OzTREKK’s Australian law school graduates have qualified and are working in Australia. For further information, you should contact the Australian Government Department of Immigration and Border Protection or an Australian consulate in Canada.

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD. Click on the links below to find out more about the university’s law program.

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For information about about law degrees offered in Australia, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call (toll free in Canada) at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Don’t miss the Australian Law School seminars

If you’re wondering what it’s like to study law in Australia and then practice in Canada, then don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

Meet Australian law alumni who are successfully practicing in Canada, and chat with Australian law school representatives to learn more about your study and career options!

Don't miss the Australian Law School seminars

Don’t forget to RSVP Australian Law Schools Seminars Jan. 30 – Feb. 9, 2017

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Friday, January 20th, 2017

Wondering how you can get into law school?

Are you interested in studying law but unsure about your options? Would you like to hear from law graduates who have studied in Australia and are now practicing lawyers in Canada?

Get into law school?

RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools seminar!

Then please join OzTREKK, Australian law school representatives, and law school alumni for the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

UQ employability program lauded in national awards

A University of Queensland student employability service has won a prestigious 2016 Australian Financial Review Higher Education Award.

The Faculty of Business, Economics and Law Student Employability Team (BEL SET) recently won the employability category ahead of finalists from the University of Sydney, Marcus Oldham College and Bond University.

UQ employability program lauded in national awards

Pictured from left to right: UQ Chancellor Peter Varghese AO, BEL SET Director Rhea Jain and UQ Provost Professor Aidan Byrne (Photo: UQ)

In their report, the judges said employability was an increasingly important issue for universities.

“The University of Queensland is to be commended for its systemic, embedded approach to boosting employability, and the demonstrable results it has produced,” they said.

UQ Provost Professor Aidan Byrne said UQ Law students in particular ranked the highest nationally in securing graduate full-time employment.

“I congratulate the BEL SET team for this outstanding result, which should give great confidence to future students considering studying business, economics or law at UQ,” Professor Byrne said.

“The BEL SET program challenges students to develop employability skills from enrolment, throughout their studies and as graduates.

“This strategy was recognised as a flagship program in the UQ student strategy 2016–2020 and was also applauded by the Group of Eight which featured it in their journal this year.”

Director Rhea Jain said the award was a reflection of the hard work and dedication of her team, who all drew from extensive experience in recruitment consulting and talent acquisition within the industries the students aspired to enter.

“Our programs are run in partnership with employers so our students learn directly from industry experts and gain real-life experiences through industry placements and professional development opportunities,” she said.

“Last financial year we placed 1800 students with almost 600 employers and supported thousands of students by providing 150 employability workshops or events in partnership with more than 100 employers.

“The program is only 18 months old and this award is further confirmation we are on the right track and will provide momentum for us to continue to develop and refine the program.”

In 2015, the BEL SET team doubled student engagement in its programs.

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Discover more about the study opportunities available at UQ Business School and at UQ Law School. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at 1-866-698-7355 or shannon@oztrekk.com!

Friday, June 24th, 2016

UQ law students win Indigenous Student Moot

Two UQ Law School students have proven their legal prowess by winning the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student Mooting competition at the Supreme Court of Queensland.

Competing in their first moot, third-year arts/law student Mollie O’Connor and second-year arts/law student Zachary Frazer successfully argued the tort law case before a distinguished bench.

UQ law students win Indigenous Student Moot

Zachary Frazer and Mollie O’Connor (Photo credit: UQ)

They competed against teams of Indigenous students from Bond University, Griffith University and the Queensland University of Technology.

The UQ duo also won the best written submissions and Ms O’Connor won for the best oral submission.

The moot was the second such annual competition run by Allens, Ashurst, North Quarter Lane Chambers and the Indigenous Lawyers Association of Queensland Inc.

TC Beirne School of Law co-curricular programs director Geneviève Murray said mooting was a valuable extracurricular activity in which students honed advocacy skills and developed confidence in an appellate court environment.

“The students speak to a panel of judges in an actual courtroom and gain experience preparing submissions and developing their analytical reasoning while working as part of a team,” Ms Murray said.

Ms Murray said mooting provided students with a resume highlight that helped set them apart in the competitive legal services job market.

Ms O’Connor and Mr Frazer were coached and mentored by two of UQ Law School’s most successful mooters, current student Elizabeth Stanley and former student Jack Siebert.

Ms O’Connor said she hoped to spend her first year after graduation as a judge’s associate before moving into a top or mid-tier law firm.

“This moot was important to me because it was representative of the fact Indigenous students like ourselves have the capability to succeed in whatever we choose to do,” she said.

“I’m very grateful for the opportunity, and for the immense support we received from so many people in the legal profession and at the university.”

Mr Frazer, who is interested in developing his career in either criminal or corporate law, said the moot helped him develop his research and advocacy skills.

“It was also good to put the theory I’ve learned in class to practice, and will no doubt be of invaluable experience for my career,” Mr Frazer said.

While not mandatory, mooting competitions are ingrained within the TC Beirne School of Law, and it is considered an honour to be selected for a team.

This year the school expects about 50 students will participate in 16 moots.

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Learn more about UQ Law School! Contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Cream of Australia’s legal crop honoured at UQ

The future of Australia’s legal profession is bright, based on the sharp young minds honoured for academic achievements and contributions to Australia’s legal services industry at the University of Queensland recently.

Head of School and Academic Dean Sarah Derrington said UQ’s TC Beirne School of Law ranked in the top 50 in the world.

Cream of Australia’s legal crop honoured at UQ

Dan Rogers, Jordan English, Chief Justice Catherine Holmes, Professor Peter Høj (Photo credit: UQ)

“Our annual awards ceremony recognises students for achieving the highest marks in some of the most challenging subjects, achieving the highest marks across the entire school and making positive and meaningful contributions through pro bono legal work,” Professor Derrington said.

“Our world-renowned lecturers were also acknowledged for excellence in their profession and for inspiring students to learn.”

University of Queensland Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said the students and teachers presented with awards were the cream of the legal crop.

“To be singled out for an award tonight from such a select intake of students is an impressive achievement and one that augurs well for their future and the future of the profession,” he said.

“It’s not easy to get into most law schools, let alone UQ’s TC Beirne School of Law which ranks in the top 50 in the world.

“Since the start of 2015 we have been reducing our first-year intake to 250 of the best and brightest OP1 students.”

Guest speaker Chief Justice Catherine Holmes of the Supreme Court of Queensland acknowledged the excellent teaching at the School of Law and praised students’ accomplishments of academic excellence and their contributions to the community through pro bono legal work.

Award-winner and recent graduate Georgia Williams was recognised for achieving the highest grade point average of the women in her graduating class and the highest overall marks in law courses and the Bachelor of Laws program.

“Throughout my time at the TC Beirne School of Law I have had the great privilege of learning from outstanding lecturers, benefitting from the school’s mooting program and sharing the experience with many people who I hope will remain my friends and mentors in the future,” she said.

Fifth-year Law/Commerce student Jordan English, who won awards for academic achievements and contributions to pro bono legal work, said the awards were welcome recognition for hard work.

“A lot of the work you do as a law student isn’t seen,” he said. “It’s usually just us studying through the night, so these awards are a good way of recognising our hard work in a public way.

“The awards will also undoubtedly help with prospective employment and I suspect they will be a good asset for any future applications for postgraduate study.”

Professor Derrington said the annual awards were an important tradition.

“These awards acknowledge excellence—the excellence of our students, the excellence of our teaching staff, and the excellence of the contributions made by our students and staff to community service and Pro Bono activities,” she said.

She said the event was also an opportunity to thank the alumni and friends whose generous donations made scholarships and awards possible.

UQ’s Forgan Smith building, which houses the School of Law, is undergoing a dramatic $33-million refurbishment, and from 2017 will feature more connected and interactive spaces to encourage a collaborative style of work and ensure students are able to use the latest in mobile technology.

UQ Law School Bachelor of Laws program

Program: Graduate-entry Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Entry requirements

To be eligible to apply to the University of Queensland Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) program, you must have

  • completed or be completing an undergraduate degree; and
  • achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%.

It is recommended that you apply if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the university. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

The UQ Law School does not require the LSAT for entry.

Apply to the University of Queensland Law School!

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To find out more about UQ Law School, contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Celebrating National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 16 – 20. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state. A range of exciting and interactive activities are being held around Australia celebrate Law Week, including courthouse tours, mock trials and student competitions.

Australian Law Schools in Australia

Bond University Law School Moot Court

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid, and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week‘s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed at the whole community. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian Law Schools.

What is the difference between the LLB and the JD?

The Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor are both professionally recognized degrees. Both LLB and JD programs educate students to practice law and allow them to apply for registration in Canada. The main difference is that the LLB is offered at the undergraduate level, and the JD is offered at the postgraduate level. Bachelor of Laws students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies, while the JD or graduate-entry LLB requires a completed bachelor degree for admission.

At some Australian Law Schools, JD programs are fast-tracked, so that you can complete them in two calendar years, as opposed to a three-year, graduate-entry LLB. Entry requirements for JD programs can be more competitive, especially as they become more popular with North American students. At universities where both a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Laws are offered, students who have already completed an undergraduate degree normally apply for the postgraduate professional qualification (JD).

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD and most offer an undergraduate-entry LLB:

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Would you like more information about law schools in Australia? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

UQ collaborates with Zurich on first international organised crime law course

A group of UQ Law School students has gained insight into corruption, money laundering and human trafficking thanks to an innovative law course in Switzerland this month.

The students participated in the first international crime and comparative criminal law course offered jointly by UQ’s TC Beirne School of Law and the University of Zurich (UZH).

UQ Law School

Staff and students in Zurich (Photo credit: UQ)

Participating UQ student Ellen Wood said each student was required to research and give a 30-minute presentation. Her topic was human trafficking.

“Our topics were all extremely relevant to current world issues, and the professors were so passionate,” she said.

“They were our mentors and I was motivated to learn as much as possible.

“I gained a real interest in examining the world of human trafficking. I have rarely felt so stimulated, determined and challenged.

“It was very interesting hearing from the perspective of the Swiss students and it fuelled class discussion.”

The course was designed to enhance students’ abilities to research and engage with foreign and international legal material, critically analyse legislation and policy, and elaborate practical recommendations for international and national legal developments.

Coordinated by University of Queensland’s Professor Andreas Schloenhardt and UZH’s Professor Frank Meyer, the course brought together 15 students from Brisbane and Zurich to focus on organised crime, including corruption, money laundering and human trafficking.

“Contemporary criminal justice is increasingly influenced by international law and law enforcement,” Professor Schloenhardt said.

“Countries differ in their ways in which this body of law is implemented. This course explores how common law and civil law jurisdictions such as Australia and Switzerland try to combat transnational crime.”

It is a new initiative to foster undergraduate research and learning in an international environment. The next course is expected will be held in Brisbane in early 2017.

Professor Schloenhardt is a visiting professor at the University of Zurich Faculty of Law.

University of Queensland Law School Bachelor of Laws program

Program: Graduate-entry Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply to the Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry), you must have the following:

  • Completed or be completing an undergraduate degree
  • Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%

It is recommended that you apply for the UQ Law School’s LLB program if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the university. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

LSAT is not required for entry.

Apply to the University of Queensland Law School!

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To find out more about UQ Law School, contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016

UQ students head to Dubai on global business

Four University of Queensland students will compete in an international business competition in Dubai in April, after notching up UQ’s third consecutive win in a national tournament.

Judges in the Australian sector of the KPMG International Case Competition praised the UQ team members for their innovative, creative and realistic solutions to the set challenge, which centred on the Qatar-FIFA World Cup scandal.

UQ Business School

The national champions: Nicole Brazier, Edward O’Brien, William Randall and Joshua Roser (Photo credit: UQ)

The national champion team—from UQ’s Faculty of Business, Economics and Law—is now preparing to take on competitors from 23 countries in the international finals.

Team member Nicole Brazier, a final-year law (First Class Honours) and science student, said the competition tested students’ flexibility, teamwork and ability to come up with innovative business solutions to real problems.

“Teams have three hours to prepare a presentation and responses on a realistic business scenario and they then answer questions from KPMG executives,” Ms Brazier said.

Her teammates include William Randall, a final-year commerce student; commerce student Edward O’Brien; and Joshua Roser, who is studying commerce/economics.

“Our team is named ‘Look At Me Now, Dad Consulting’ and has a strong combination of academic excellence and commercial experience,” Ms Brazier said.

“We are all involved in the UQ community in volunteer and leadership positions. Most of us met in person for the first time only on the morning of the state finals, but we quickly established a cohesive and friendly team.

“Over the summer, we did a lot of preparation as a group to ensure our state win was more than just beginner’s luck.”

Ms Brazier said the team was excited about participating in the world finals and hoped to follow in the winning footsteps of 2014 UQ team members, who have been providing advice and guidance.

The 2014 team comprised Lachlan Campbell (Bachelor of Laws/Commerce), Daniel Mouat (Bachelor Commerce/ Economics), Jonathan Black (Bachelor of Laws/ Commerce) and Samuel Leigh (Bachelor of Laws/ Commerce).

The KPMG International Case Competition has been running for 13 years.

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To find out more about UQ Law School and UQ Business School. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

UQ landmark to undergo dramatic refurbishment

Queensland judicial leaders tried their hands as graffiti artists at the University of Queensland’s landmark Forgan Smith building recently to mark the beginning of a new chapter in the building’s history.

The building houses the TC Beirne School of Law, which is set for a dramatic refurbishment to begin in January.

University of Queensland Forgan Smith Building

UQ Forgan Smith building today

The graffiti—recording fun and fond memories of the school’s alumni and students—was a symbolic farewell to the walls that have contained the hopes and dreams of about 10,000 law students over the past 66 years.

UQ Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said the 12-month refurbishment would be an exciting rejuvenation of the historic building to bring it into line with the world’s best contemporary education facilities.

“The aim is to improve the student experience by creating a place of light, learning and collaboration, incorporating the latest technology and facilities,” he said.

“The rejuvenation will not affect the beautiful and historic sandstone façade, but will see a dramatic re-modelling of the internal space to create a state-of-the-art teaching and research facility befitting our law school’s ranking among the top 50 in the world.”

Historic features such as the magnificent red cedar-panelled Moot Court—previously Brisbane’s Supreme Court—would be preserved and re-installed in the remodelled facility.

Professor Høj said the significant cost of the work would be met by a combination of university capital works funding and philanthropic donations, much like the way the university and its alumni almost three decades ago came together to bring Customs House back to its rightful glory for the ongoing benefit of both the university and indeed Brisbane.

Head of School and Dean of Law Professor Sarah Derrington said the new space was designed to support a major refocusing of the UQ Law School and would provide a dynamic and inspiring environment for students and teachers.

“Teaching in today’s world is a stimulating, interactive and ever-evolving experience,” she said. “In addition, the legal workplace is changing, with more collaborative work practices between younger lawyers and their senior colleagues.

“The new space will include collaborative research spaces and break-out rooms, independent study areas, and facilities for mobile technology, innovative learning, research and academic facilities.”

University of Queensland

Artist’s impression of the Forgan Smith refurbishment (Image credit: UQ)

Professor Derrington said philanthropic support would also be sought to establish an endowed scholarship fund.

“As part of the school restructure, we are deliberately reducing our first-year intake to no more than 250 of the best and brightest students, and we are providing them with innovative programs, collaborative learning opportunities and excellent student-to-teacher ratios,” she said.

“One of the major hurdles for financially disadvantaged students is the cost of living while undertaking a full-time degree.

“An endowed scholarship fund will enable our school to offer students scholarships that alleviate the imperative to work to survive.”

The rejuvenation, which has been more than a year in the planning, has been designed by BVN Architecture under the guidance of heritage architect Andrew Ladlay.

University of Queensland Law School Bachelor of Laws program

Program: Graduate-entry Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply to the Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry), you must have the following:

  • Completed or be completing an undergraduate degree
  • Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%

It is recommended that you apply for the UQ Law School’s LLB program if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the university. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

LSAT is not required for entry.

Apply to the University of Queensland Law School!

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To find out more about UQ Law School, contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.