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Articles categorized as ‘Griffith University Law School’

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Griffith Law Futures Centre research finding solutions to 21st century problems

Griffith University launched the Law Futures Centre at South Bank campus on Wednesday, March 22.

Acting Director and international lawyer Professor Don Anton says the centre’s researchers are already responding to 21st century challenges to law and legal institutions.

Griffith Law Futures Centre research – finding solutions to 21st century problems

Professor Don Anton (Photo: Griffith University)

Griffith Law School is placed in the top 50 law schools in the world and research in law is a key strength of the university,’’ he said.

“The centre will continue to leverage off these strengths and expand our research presence nationally and internationally. It will undertake interdisciplinary research responsive to domestic and global change.”​​

Two of the current nine Australian Research Council Future Fellows in law, Professor Elena Marchetti and Associate Professor Susan Harris-Rimmer, feature in the line-up of the Centre’s staff from Griffith Law School—with other academics from law, environmental sciences, international relations, business, health, criminology and humanities.

The centre’s four research programs focus on solving legal problems posed in the areas of

  • Law, Governance and Global Change
  • Law & Nature
  • Law, Risk and Innovation
  • Lawyering, Legal Education & the Future of Law

“I look forward to the LFC meeting the most pressing emerging challenges for law and legal institutions in Australia and internationally; harnessing the law as a key tool for shaping the future,’’ Professor Anton said.

Griffith Bachelor of Laws

Griffith’s Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) degree includes courses that will equip you to sit the NCA accreditation exams when you finish your degree. You can even sit these exams at the Gold Coast. With a Griffith law degree you could seek admission to practice in both Australia and Canada.

Canadian Law Electives

The following courses are taught in Year 3 as optional electives to assist students who wish to return to Canada to practice:

  • Foundations of Canadian Law
  • Canadian Criminal Law
  • Canadian Constitutional Law
  • Canadian Administrative Law
  • Canadian Legal Professional Responsibility

Program: Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Candidates are strongly encouraged to apply at least three months prior to the program’s start date to allow time for the pre-departure process.

Apply to Griffith University Law School!

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Discover more about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Don’t miss the Australian Law School seminars

If you’re wondering what it’s like to study law in Australia and then practice in Canada, then don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

Meet Australian law alumni who are successfully practicing in Canada, and chat with Australian law school representatives to learn more about your study and career options!

Don't miss the Australian Law School seminars

Don’t forget to RSVP Australian Law Schools Seminars Jan. 30 – Feb. 9, 2017

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Friday, January 20th, 2017

Wondering how you can get into law school?

Are you interested in studying law but unsure about your options? Would you like to hear from law graduates who have studied in Australia and are now practicing lawyers in Canada?

Get into law school?

RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools seminar!

Then please join OzTREKK, Australian law school representatives, and law school alumni for the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

Join us for the upcoming Griffith Law School seminars!

Find out how you can study law at Griffith University and return home to practice! Don’t miss the upcoming Griffith Law School seminars Nov. 29 – Dec. 2, 2016.

Griffith Law School seminars

RSVP for the Griffith Law School seminars

At the information sessions, Griffith Law School Dean and Head of School Prof Penelope Mathew and Deputy Head of School Associate Professor Therese Wilson will speak about the faculty and about studying law at Griffith:

  • Griffith University
  • Griffith Law School
  • Graduate Bachelor of Laws program
  • Program structure
  • Admissions requirements
  • Application process
  • Accreditation
  • Life on campus
  • And much more!

Griffith University Law School Information Sessions

Join Griffith Law School for these upcoming seminars. Enjoy refreshments, meet like-minded people, and speak with a current Griffith LLB student who will be attending the Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver info sessions.

Ottawa

Date: Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016
Time: 6 p.m.
Venue: Westin Ottawa, Spruce Room

Toronto

Date: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016
Time:  6 p.m.
Venue: BL 205 Claude T. Bissell Building, University of Toronto

Edmonton

Date: Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016
Time:  5:30 p.m.
Venue: 2-25 Humanities Centre, University of Alberta

Burnaby

Date: Friday, Dec. 2, 2016
Time:  5:30 p.m.
Venue: 10051 Saywell Hall, Simon Fraser University

To register for any of the seminars, visit http://study.oztrekk.com/griffith-law-nov-2016/

About the Griffith Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)

The Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) at Griffith Law School offers a professional legal curriculum that focuses on core areas of legal practice and the legal skills that lawyers must have. You will have the opportunity to choose law electives based on your interests, including clinical courses that emphasise practical legal skills, insights and experience.

You can also double your career options, without doubling your study time, by completing a double degree. You’ll study two Griffith degrees simultaneously, giving you the career advantage of a special combination of skills.

  • Laws/Arts
  • Laws/Business
  • Laws/Commerce
  • Laws/Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Laws/Government and International Relations
  • Laws/International Business
  • Laws/Psychological Science
  • Laws/Science (Environment)

Program: Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Candidates are strongly encouraged to apply at least three months prior to the program’s start date to allow time for the pre-departure process.

Apply to Griffith University Law School!

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Find out more about these information sessions and about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Griffith Law moot maestros win national torts competition

Griffith law students have taken out the QUT Torts Moot competition for the first time, successfully arguing a medical negligence case.

Charlotte Roache and James Vercoe from the Griffith Law School saw off the challenge from the University of Sydney in the grand final at the Banco Law Court, Brisbane to claim the prestigious title.

 Griffith moot maestros win national torts competition

Moot winners James Vercoe and Charlotte Roache with coach Dr Kylie Burns (centre) (Photo credit: Griffith University)

This year’s problem related to medical negligence, and the question of whether a doctor had failed his pregnant patient in relation to the planning and management of the birth.

“It was great to learn about an area that has practical significance to our everyday lives,’’ Charlotte said.

“Knowing what the law requires of our doctors when they advise patients and mooting that question in front of judges who actually decide these matters, gives you an invaluable insight into how the law and the medical profession intersect.”

Moot coach Dr Kylie Burns said Charlotte and James were an outstanding team.

“They had a deep knowledge of the subject matter, remained calm under pressure and were confident in their submissions,” she said.

Griffith was one of only four teams to advance to the semi-finals. They were joined by the University of Sydney, UQ and UTS. The grand final saw Griffith meet the only other undefeated team in the competition, the University of Sydney.

The final was judged by Justices Mullins and Applegarth of the Queensland Supreme Court, and Judge Kent QC of the District Court.

This is the second time that Charlotte and James have won a national moot. In 2015 they won the Michael Kirby National Contracts Moot in Melbourne (with fellow student Dean Aitchison), as well as picking up numerous other team and individual prizes.

Canadian Law Electives

The Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) at Griffith Law School offers a professional legal curriculum that focuses on core areas of legal practice and the legal skills that lawyers must have. You will have the opportunity to choose law electives based on your interests, including clinical courses that emphasise practical legal skills, insights and experience. The following courses are taught in Year 3 as optional electives to assist students who wish to return to Canada to practice:

  • Foundations of Canadian Law
  • Canadian Criminal Law
  • Canadian Constitutional Law
  • Canadian Administrative Law
  • Canadian Legal Professional Responsibility

Program: Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

Could the next Olympics violate human rights?

On August 5, 2016, Rio will become the first South American city to host the Summer Olympics. Along with the usual fanfare, there are also human rights concerns over the ongoing outbreak of the mosquito-borne Zika virus and its potential impact on athletes and visitors. So much so that dozens of athletes from all over the world have decided to forego the event.

Few sports fans would associate their favourite competition with international human rights law, but according to one legal academic there are some surprising connections at play.

Monash Law School Professor Sarah Joseph, who will deliver the 2016 Michael Wincop Memorial Lecture in August, said sporting’s biggest event—the Olympics—has been embroiled in human rights controversy.

Could the next Olympics violate human rights?

Are we ready for the consequences of going ahead with the Rio Olympic games? (Photo: Griffith University)

The public lecture is being hosted by Griffith Law School’s Law Futures Centre.

Professor Joseph argues that holding the Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro, when there are serious health concerns about the Zika virus, could potentially violate human rights.

“It is highly unlikely that the [Rio Olympics] will be cancelled, despite the fact that it will inevitably spread Zika worldwide. Will this decision result in major threats to the enjoyment of the right to health?” she said.

Major sporting events like the FIFA World Cup and the Olympics can also lead to other human rights abuses, like the forced eviction of citizens to make way for the stadiums and facilities that need to be built.

Professor Joseph said while responsibility for evicting people falls to the host government, do sporting bodies like the International Olympic Committee and FIFA owe any human rights obligations to the people affected?

“Should events be awarded to countries with terrible human rights records, such as Russia, especially if preparation for the event might lead to abuses, such as deaths during stadium construction in Qatar?” she said.

Professor Joseph said that human rights issues could also arise at the individual level, where the labour rights of athletes are often severely constrained by administrative processes.

“Why is a young AFL draftee not able to play for the club of his choice, but can only play for the club that picks him? Why can they only move to the club of their choice after ten years of playing for the same club?” she said.

What’s most troubling is the way in which some sporting bodies and clubs disregard the health rights of their players. Professor Joseph said the Essendon Football Club doping scandal reveals how the club failed in its duty of care.

“They have been fined for OHS (occupational health and safety) breaches, but the affected players still do not know what they were injected with by their own employer,” she said.

Professor Joseph says that human rights obligations are also at stake in the many football codes that carry the risk of long-term brain damage due to multiple concussions.

Time magazine recently reported that over forty percent of NFL players in the US might have brain injuries. What did the NFL know about the dangers of its product for its employees and when?” she said.

While it may not seem it at first, the sporting arena is rife with human rights issues and obligations that are yet to be determined.

The public lecture that will explore these issues is hosted by the Law Futures Centre and is held annually to honour the scholarship and contributions of the late Professor Michael Whincop.

International Human Rights Law

International Human Rights Law at Griffith Law School is designed to expose students to the laws which deal with the protection of individuals and groups against violations by governments of certain internationally guaranteed rights. Students will gain a greater understanding of some of the theoretical, political and socio-economic issues associated with human rights awareness, advocacy and litigation. This course focuses on the structures and processes through which international human rights norms are established and transformed into rights. Students will gain insight into the relationship of international human rights norms to the Australian national legal system and the specific techniques for the implementation of human rights in domestic and international law.

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Find out more about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

Griffith Law School walks to raise money amid legal aid funding crisis

Griffith Law School staff and students joined other local lawyers in their support for the Queensland Legal Walk.

Held annually as part of National Law Week (this year held May 16 – 20), lawyers across Queensland walked simultaneously to raise funds for the Queensland Public Law Interest Clearing House.

Griffith Law School walks to raise money

Staff and students from Team Griffith Law School turned out to fundraise for QPILCH (Photo credit: Griffith University)

This year’s funds will be used to support QPILCH’s Mental Health Law Practice, which provides free legal advice and assistance to people with mental illness who cannot afford a private lawyer.

Participants raised more than $43,000, to assist QPILCH provide its legal services to some of the most disadvantaged Australians in the community. This year’s funding more than doubles the money raised from last year.

While support for the annual Queensland Legal Walk has increased across the state, it takes place amid what the Law Council of Australia describes as a ‘funding crisis’ for legal aid.

The Law Council of Australia launched the Legal Aid Matters campaign during National Law Week, to call for a commitment from ‘whoever wins the election’ to greater funding for legal aid services across Australia.

The campaign has broad support from a range of legal industry bodies that are concerned that there is a real risk that without further funding ordinary Australians will be locked out of the justice system.

Law Council of Australia President Stuart Clark spoke to the ABC about what was at stake.

“Every time a person goes to court without legal representation, they’re at a real disadvantage,” he said.

“It could be in the family court, it could be in a criminal court, it could be in a civil court. We know the fact people are going to court unrepresented is an absolute tragedy. It is, quite simply destroying lives.”

Griffith Law School

Griffith Law School is one of the world’s top 100 law schools. Here, students gain all the legal skills to become an accomplished lawyer and have the opportunity to specialise the area of their choice.

The Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) at Griffith Law School offers a professional legal curriculum that focuses on core areas of legal practice and the legal skills that lawyers must have. You will have the opportunity to choose law electives based on your interests, including clinical courses that emphasise practical legal skills, insights and experience.

Program: Bachelor of Laws
Location: Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith Law School!

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Do you have any questions regarding Griffith Law School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Why Canadians should study law at Griffith University

Griffith Law School is ranked in the top 100 law schools in the 2015/2016 QS World University Rankings. Griffith students learn from award-winning teachers who have been recognised by the Australian Government’s Office of Learning and Teaching for their outstanding teaching quality. In addition to studying the core areas of legal practice, students may choose from a range of exciting electives across five areas: global law and governance; law and commerce; environment and social justice; theories and contexts of law; and clinical and legal professional practice, which includes clinical courses that offer practical legal skills, insights and experiences.

Why Canadians should study law at Griffith University

Find out how you can study law at Griffith University

Griffith’s Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) degree now includes courses that will equip you to sit the NCA accreditation exams when you finish your degree. You can even sit these exams at the Gold Coast. With a Griffith law degree you could seek admission to practice in both Australia and Canada.

Canadian Law Electives

The following courses are taught in Year 3 as optional electives to assist students who wish to return to Canada to practice:

  • Foundations of Canadian Law
  • Canadian Criminal Law
  • Canadian Constitutional Law
  • Canadian Administrative Law
  • Canadian Legal Professional Responsibility

Program: Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Law School!

*

Find out more about this webinar and about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Griffith Law student wins Law Without Walls event

Griffith Law student Courtney Rickersey was in the winning team at the Law Without Walls ConPosium held in Florida, US last month.

Griffith Law School

Aina Cordero, Carolina van der Mensbrugghe and Courtney Rickersey celebrate their win with Professor John Flood, Director of the Law Futures Centre at Griffith University (Photo credit: Griffith University)

With fellow students Carolina van der Mensbrugghe from Fordham Law School, New York and Aina Cordero from the University of St Gallen, Switzwerland, Courtney presented a multimedia app called Vide that will enable defendants to prepare for their sentencing hearings by creating a video biography.

“It’s a multimedia advocacy tool that can be use by defendants in New York City,” Courtney said.

“We aim to revolutionise and redistribute the power in the courtroom so that we can create change to sentences.

“Vide is the Latin word for ‘see’ and we want the defendant to be seen. We want their perspective to be in focus.”

Vide is streamlined and simple, taking the defendant step by step through the process and instead of being a statistic the defendant is humanised. It’s advocacy through storytelling.

Law Without Walls is a global, transdisciplinary think-tank around technology, innovation and law. The ConPosium showcases Law Without Walls skills and innovations for the law market.

About the Griffith Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)

The Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) at Griffith Law School offers a professional legal curriculum that focuses on core areas of legal practice and the legal skills that lawyers must have. You will have the opportunity to choose law electives based on your interests, including clinical courses that emphasise practical legal skills, insights and experience.

You can also double your career options, without doubling your study time, by completing a double degree. You’ll study two Griffith degrees simultaneously, giving you the career advantage of a special combination of skills.

  • Laws/Arts
  • Laws/Business
  • Laws/Commerce
  • Laws/Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Laws/Government and International Relations
  • Laws/International Business
  • Laws/Psychological Science
  • Laws/Science (Environment)

Program: Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Law School!

*

Find out more about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Celebrating National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 16 – 20. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state. A range of exciting and interactive activities are being held around Australia celebrate Law Week, including courthouse tours, mock trials and student competitions.

Australian Law Schools in Australia

Bond University Law School Moot Court

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid, and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week‘s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed at the whole community. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian Law Schools.

What is the difference between the LLB and the JD?

The Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor are both professionally recognized degrees. Both LLB and JD programs educate students to practice law and allow them to apply for registration in Canada. The main difference is that the LLB is offered at the undergraduate level, and the JD is offered at the postgraduate level. Bachelor of Laws students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies, while the JD or graduate-entry LLB requires a completed bachelor degree for admission.

At some Australian Law Schools, JD programs are fast-tracked, so that you can complete them in two calendar years, as opposed to a three-year, graduate-entry LLB. Entry requirements for JD programs can be more competitive, especially as they become more popular with North American students. At universities where both a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Laws are offered, students who have already completed an undergraduate degree normally apply for the postgraduate professional qualification (JD).

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD and most offer an undergraduate-entry LLB:

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Would you like more information about law schools in Australia? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.