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Articles categorized as ‘University of Sydney Health Sciences’

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

Attend a Sydney Health Sciences Seminar

Would you like to further your studies in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology or another health science field?

Attend an upcoming University of Sydney Health Sciences information session between March 28 and 30 and get your questions answered!

Venue: University of Toronto, Bahen Centre, Room 2175
Date: Tuesday, March 28
Time: 6 p.m.

Venue: Simon Fraser University, Halpern Centre, Room 114
Date: Wednesday, March 29
Time: 5 p.m.

Venue: University of British Columbia, Woodward Building, Room 3
Date: Thursday, March 30
Time: 5 p.m.

Be sure to RSVP for a Sydney Health Sciences Information Session!

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Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?

Are you interested in health sciences? You’ve got a wonderful selection of study areas to choose from: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology…. But have you considered exercise and sports science?

Sydney Health Sciences is known for world-leading health sciences education and research. The discipline of exercise and sport science focuses on the integration of exercise and physical activity into health care, sports performance, disease prevention and rehabilitation.

Graduates have the opportunity to utilise principles such as biomechanics, musculoskeletal rehabilitation and gait analysis to evaluate and improve the performance of a diverse range of athletes.

The career paths followed by graduates are many and varied and depend mostly on the specific interests and aspirations of the individual. Broadly defined, the areas of employment entered by recent graduates include the sport industry, fitness industry, health industry, occupational health and safety, public health, rehabilitation, research and technology, education and medical insurance.

University of Sydney Master of Exercise Physiology

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?

Dr Ollie Jay is the Director of the Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory and a Senior Lecturer in Thermoregulatory Physiology at the Faculty of Health Sciences. (Photo: University of Sydney)

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA

Apply to the University of Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences!

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Find out more about studying the Master of Exercise Physiology at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 13th, 2016

Donation helps construction of University of Sydney Health Precinct

The University of Sydney has received a $35-million gift from the Susan and Isaac Wakil Foundation.  In 2015 the Wakils gave an unprecedented $10.8 million to Sydney Nursing School to establish 12 annual nursing scholarships, bringing their total university giving to nearly $46 million.

University of Sydney Health Precinct

Isaac and Susan Wakil have made a $35 million donation to the university (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The gift will enable construction of the main building within the University of Sydney’s proposed Health Precinct. For the first time multiple health disciplines will come together in a purpose-built facility to translate research into education and clinical services.

“We were inspired by the radical and innovative approach the University of Sydney is taking to address immediate and future healthcare challenges,’’ Mr Wakil said. “Susan and I are pleased to be able to make this project a reality.”

Chancellor Belinda Hutchinson AM highlights the impact the Wakil’s donation will have on the community.  “Susan and Isaac Wakil’s incredible generosity will harness greater collaboration between all the health faculties to deliver better healthcare to millions of people,” said the Chancellor. “The next generation of health professionals must meet the challenges in healthcare in Australia and internationally with training that supports innovative, multidisciplinary team-based clinical care.”

The Susan Wakil Health Building will co-locate the faculties of Nursing and Midwifery and Health Sciences, with components of Medicine, Pharmacy and Dentistry. It will provide state of the art clinical simulation programs and a multi-service clinic, as well as flexible infrastructure that supports team-based research programs.

“Thanks to the Wakil’s extraordinary gift, we can provide a hub for students of the health disciplines where knowledge and skills are shared and developed across the faculties,” said Vice-Chancellor and Principal Dr Michael Spence. “The Health Precinct is being designed on the successful multi-disciplinary model of the Charles Perkins Centre. By combining knowledge across disciplines, we can translate research into real-world outcomes.”

Susan and Isaac Wakil’s incredible generosity will harness greater collaboration between all the health faculties to deliver better healthcare to millions of people.

In further recognition of the gift, the Faculty of Nursing will be named “The University of Sydney Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery.” The university will also name the professorship held by the Dean of the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery as “The Susan Wakil Dean’s Professorship of Nursing and Midwifery” while a second professorship will be called “The Susan and Isaac Wakil Professorship of Healthy Ageing,” in recognition of both donors.

Honorary Associate Professor Ross Steele AM is a longstanding friend of the Wakils and introduced them to the work being done at the University of Sydney. “I’m delighted to have helped connect the Wakil’s desire to support Australia’s healthcare system with the university’s visionary approach to health research and education.”

The Wakils’ gift is the largest donation to the University of Sydney since it was founded in 1850. The campaign to support the University of Sydney is the most successful fundraising campaign in Australian higher education history, having raised more than $600 million via philanthropic donations, two years ahead of schedule.

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Would you like more information about the programs offered at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, November 9th, 2015

University of Sydney Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health subjects rank well

The University of Sydney was placed second in Australia and 33rd globally in the Times Higher Education subject rankings for Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health. This high rank is driven by strong performance in citations and research reputation.

Sydney Dental School

Study at the University of Sydney

This subject area encompasses the Sydney Medical School and includes significant contributions from the faculties of Science, Health Sciences, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing.

The university has consistently ranked within the top 50 universities globally in Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health in the Times Higher Education rankings since 2011.

The Times Higher Education made significant changes to their methodology this year, but the University of Sydney continues to remain securely within the top 50 institutions globally.

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Would you like more information about the programs offered at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

University of Sydney embarks on epic health education challenge

It’s not often that pharmacy and exercise physiology students share a classroom, but the University of Sydney is breaking new ground in interprofessional learning aimed at mimicking the real-life cases of Australians struggling with heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

More than 1,300 health professional students came together in September for the Health Collaboration Challenge, an innovative learning activity designed to provide health and medical students with the chance to work in multidisciplinary teams.

University of Sydney Pharmacy School

L – R: Sarah Standen and team mates Tsang (Pharmacy), Deborah (Medicine), Nicholas (Medicine) and Tram (Nursing) (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

“We are the only university in Australia that offers such a broad range of health disciplines and this initiative allows us to capitalise on that by giving students the opportunity to gain a better understanding of each other’s professions and how they work together,” said Professor Pip Pattison, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education).

Over three days students from nursing, medicine, pharmacy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, physiotherapy, diagnostic radiography and exercise physiology took part in team-building activities and competed in teams of six to devise a management plan for a patient with complex health needs. Each team was required to produce a five-minute video and one page abstract that demonstrates their management plan for their patient, and to peer evaluate each other’s work.

“Your patient cases are going to look messy because that’s what real life is like and you are going to need to work together to solve it,” said Dr Christopher Gordon in his opening remarks to students.

Master of Exercise Physiology student Sarah Standen said the challenge was different to any learning activity she had ever taken part in.

“It’s a really different way to learn and helps us understand how best to work with patients when they have other issues outside our professional scope,” said Sarah.

University of Sydney Pharmacy School

L – R: Associate Professor Chen, Dr Nisbet, Dr Gordon and Associate Professor Jorm overseeing the final day of challenge (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The initiative was developed by Associate Professor Timothy Chen, Dr Christopher Gordon, Associate Professor Christine Jorm, Dr Gillian Nisbet, and Associate Professor Christopher Roberts under a University of Sydney Educational Innovation Grant.

The grant, together with support from Sydney e-learning, enabled both the 2015 delivery and developmental work to make this a sustainable learning activity for the university. The academics even hope to expand the program to include students from dietetics, social work and psychology in 2016.

Bachelor of Pharmacy Program at Sydney Pharmacy School

The Bachelor of Pharmacy program provides students with the core skills and knowledge required for the effective delivery of pharmaceutical care and the ability to proceed to research. Students will study the chemical, physical, pharmaceutical, and pharmacological properties of medicinal substances and the application of these in the pharmacy profession. The Faculty of Pharmacy has an enviable national and international reputation that means students will study and interact with world-renowned academics and enjoy access to best practice teaching laboratories and cutting-edge technology.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: January 31, 2016; however, it is recommended that Canadian students apply as early as possible to provide time for the pre-departure process.

Apply to Sydney Pharmacy School!

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Do you have questions about Sydney Pharmacy School and about studying pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free at Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, October 2nd, 2015

Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences students get a taste for research

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Health Sciences have a unique opportunity to gain hands-on research experience as part of a new scholarship program.

University of Sydney Physiotherapy School

Scholarship recipients Amy Large and Sarah Hawker working on the 1000 Norms Project in the Sydney Performance Lab (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Four of the best and brightest Indigenous students have taken part in the program which allows them to spend four weeks during study break working on the day-to-day running of an academic research project of their choice.

Program Coordinator Dr John Gilroy and Mrs Simone Cherie-Holt said the faculty attracts some very bright Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, but many don’t understand the research process and opportunities to progress onto honours, masters or PhD programs.

“The scholarships provide opportunities for our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to experience research early on and gain a better appreciation for what it can do for their careers as health professionals,” said Dr Gilroy.

The Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences has a long history of supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students through the Yooroang Garang Indigenous Student Support Unit, and has graduated 79 Indigenous allied health students between 1992 and 2014.

Indigenous student support officer Simone-Cherie Holt said many students had never considered research as a career or development opportunity before hearing about the scholarship program.

“This program is important because even if students don’t choose to keep going formally in academia, they will leave with a better understanding of research and how to implement it, which makes them better health practitioners,” said Mrs Cherie-Holt.

Physiotherapy students Scott Daley, Cameron Edward, Sarah Large and Amy Hawker are the first to be awarded the scholarship. All chose to work on the 1000 Norms Project with researchers Marnee McKay and Jennifer Baldwin.

Ms McKay said she is impressed with the professionalism and work-ethic of the students and encourages other academics to consider becoming involved in the program.

The scholarship program is an initiative of the Faculty of Health Sciences, funded by the University of Sydney’s Wingara Mura – Bunga Barrabugu strategy which aims to improve the engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in all areas of university life.

University of Sydney’s Master of Physiotherapy

The University of Sydney offers a two year, graduate-entry Master of Physiotherapy program, which is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in a related field and who wish to gain the requirements to become a physiotherapist. Coursework throughout this program builds on the major areas of the profession, such as musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary and neurological physiotherapy, as well as looking at the profession in its societal context.

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March each year

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Discover more about Sydney Physiotherapy School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at 1-866-698-7355 or jaime@oztrekk.com and find out how you can study in Australia!

Monday, September 14th, 2015

Health benefits of dog ownership explored in new research node

Man’s best friend is set to become his lab partner, with the launch of a research node on the health effects of dog ownership at the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre.

In collaboration with the RSPCA NSW, the dog ownership node brings together experts in public health, physical activity and exercise, disease prevention, behaviour change, health psychology, human-animal interactions, and canine health.

Researchers hope the node will shed light on not only how dog ownership influences human health, but also on how these benefits could be harnessed as part of the health care system.

University of Sydney Health Sciences

Sydney researchers will explore the psychological and psychosocial benefits of dog ownership

“Fragmented research has indicated the benefits of dog ownership on health, and in particular on physical activity through dog walking, but it has so far failed to provide a body of evidence on the extent of these benefits, and how and why they occur,” said node leader Associate Professor Manos Stamatakis, from the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

“We know that dogs can be not only a catalyst for physical activity, which is a major health issue in our society, but dog ownership can also address social isolation; the lack of connection between humans.

“What we want to understand is why these benefits occur. Is it because of the ownership itself, or because there is another mechanism that mediates this, like walking or companionship?”

The node is one of the world’s first coordinated, comprehensive research efforts in the field, and is the first to make interventions in human health its top priority.

With one of the world’s highest rates of dog ownership, Australia is uniquely positioned to take advantage of the health benefits of owning a dog.

Thirty-nine per cent of Australian households own a dog, and of these around two-thirds are estimated to be under-walked. Interventions designed to increase dog walking could therefore have a marked impact on human health.

Along with physical activity, researchers will also explore the psychological and psychosocial benefits of dog ownership, which are becoming increasingly important as the population ages.

“We know that with older age comes increasing isolation, and with that comes loneliness. It’s a major cardiovascular disease risk factor, it’s a major cancer risk factor, and it’s a major risk factor for depression,” Associate Professor Stamatakis said.

“One aspect of human isolation can be addressed simply by owning a dog, because of their companionship, unconditional acceptance and love that humans often do not get from other people.

“The second aspect is that the dog can be a catalyst to tighten human social connections and increase networks.”

According to Brendon Neilly, RSPCA NSW’s Executive Manager of Animal Care Services, the data produced by the Charles Perkins Centre’s dog ownership node could be used to make significant advances in human and animal health, with a potential path cleared for dogs to be used as part of the health care system.

“We could say to people like health care providers, public transport providers, rental accommodation owners, local governments, nursing homes and community groups that it’s not just anecdotal and it’s not just about letting people keep pets,” Mr Neilly said.

“If we can demonstrate a physiological measure, a genuine value, we can make real improvements to quality of life. And that’s for both owners and pets.”

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Wondering what it’s like to study at the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences? Contact OzTREKK!

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

Sydney Health Sciences students play for Disability Awareness Week

Students from the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences will compete against the professionals in a friendly match at the university’s Cumberland campus to raise awareness of the Pave the Way campaign on Sept. 3 and highlight Disability Awareness Week from Sept. 7 – 11.

Cumberland Student Guild Vice President and fourth-year physiotherapy student representative Hui San said the players felt really connected with the aims of the Pave the Way campaign.

University of Sydney Physiotherapy School

Sydney Health Sciences students will play for Disability Awareness Week

“It aims to support students with physical barriers and help fund research that will improve the health and well-being of people of all needs and abilities,” she said.

Pave the Way is a 24-hour fundraising and awareness campaign and the University of Sydney‘s second annual giving day and the only challenge of its kind at any Australian university.

One of the areas being supported by Pave the Way is the bursary fund for students with disabilities who experience short-term financial hardship.

Rhys Baxter from the NSW Institute of Sport (NSWIS) said he loved attending the university to teach students about wheelchair basketball.”We’re grateful that the student community here at Cumberland campus were so keen to show their support and get involved.”

Sydney Uni Wheel Kings player and Wheelchair Sports NSW representative Rick Engles explained wheelchair basketball—which is open to male and female athletes with permanent physical impairment to their lower limbs—is one of the major disabled sports practiced today.

“The game retains most key rules and scoring of basketball, including the ten-foot basketball hoop and standard basketball court,” he said.

“Players are assigned a point value from 1 to 4.5 according to their level of physical function, and teams may not exceed 14 points for the five players on court.”

NSWIS athlete and national wheelchair basketball team member Hannah Dodd said the event was also a chance for students to get a better understanding of what being in a wheelchair was like.

“Opportunities like this, where students can get in the wheelchairs and experience sports like wheelchair basketball firsthand, help our future physios and occupational therapists to be better at their jobs. They’re more empathetic to the needs of people and athletes with disabilities,” she said.

University of Sydney Master of Physiotherapy

The University of Sydney offers a two-year graduate-entry Master of Physiotherapy program, which is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in a related field and who wish to gain the requirements to become a physiotherapist.

Coursework throughout this program builds on the major areas of the profession, such as musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary and neurological physiotherapy, as well as looking at the profession in its societal context.

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: October 1, 2015

Apply to the University of Sydney Master of Physiotherapy

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Learn more about the Sydney Physiotherapy School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Sydney research shows public appetite for healthier vending machines

Health conscious Australians are hungry for more nutritious options in fast food vending machines according to new research by the University of Sydney and University of Wollongong.

The study, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, reveals an appetite for healthy food options such as fresh fruit, vegetables, and yoghurt in vending machines in public places like hospitals and universities.

University of Sydney Public Health School

University of Sydney Prof Vicki Flood

Eighty seven percent of the 240 people surveyed thought the current range of vending machine snacks are “too unhealthy,” with 80 percent willing to pay the same or even extra dollars for healthier alternatives.

The lead researcher and accredited practising dietitian, Professor Vicki Flood from the University of Sydney, said vending machines are part of an unhealthy environment which is contributing to a rise in diabetes and obesity through the availability of energy-dense snacks and sugary drinks.

“We know that around one third of our daily calorie intake comes from snacking and with the busy lifestyles that we all lead, healthy eating often falls victim to convenience,” said Professor Flood.

“However this study shows that many Australians are becoming more aware of their diet and there is an opportunity to use vending machines to promote healthy snacking, particularly in busy environments like train stations and hospitals.”

The study was conducted in a university campus and public hospital in regional Australia, and surveyed the views of over 120 students and 120 hospital employees, patients and visitors.

The researchers also assessed the impact front-of-packet nutritional labelling had on purchase decisions, finding that more people chose the healthier food option when presented with nutritional values before purchase. The same impact was not seen in the drinks category.

A 2012 audit of vending machines in Sydney train stations by Professor Flood and colleagues at the University of Wollongong found few healthy snacks are on offer.

Only three percent of all vending machine slots were allocated to healthier choices like nuts, tuna or portion-controlled chips, and these options were generally more expensive.

Following a food preferences survey of 650 students earlier this year, the University of Sydney will be trialing more nutritious options in vending machines from Semester 2, 2015.

Ms Elly Howse from the Health Sydney University initiative said over 90 percent of students showed an interest in healthier food for lower cost.

“We are trialling better vending machine options in popular library and study spaces, as we know from our students that convenient food options are needed after-hours when campus food outlets are closed,” said Ms Howse.

“This is just one of the many initiatives we are undertaking at the University of Sydney, in collaboration with the University of Sydney Union, to give students more choice and opportunities to make better decisions for their health and well-being.”

Professor Flood said there are logistical challenges to improving vending machines but innovative businesses in Queensland and Melbourne have already recognised the market potential.

Public Health at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Public health a Sydney Uni is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: January 31, 2016 for the March 2016 intake

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Sydney Health Sciences receives Australia Awards Fellowship funding

Twelve research Australia Awards Fellows from South East Asia will come to the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences this October to learn how to apply physical activity, exercise and sports participation as a tool to improve health in their home countries.

Bringing the emerging career researchers to the faculty has been made possible due to the receipt of an Australia Awards Fellowships overseen by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT).

University of Sydney Health Sciences

Learn more about Sydney Health Sciences

This is the first time the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences has received a training grant from DFAT to train researchers in the university’s core values of physical activity promotion and sports participation for healthy ageing within the cultural context of Southeast Asia.

The award of just over $100,000 will be used to bring researchers to Sydney from four universities in Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia. The research will focus on low physical activity uptake in those countries and the real barriers to adults in undertaking physical activity for better health.

The researchers will work with under the supervision of senior professors and alongside PhD students to help them focus their research and give them practical training to use when they return home. After their return, their faculty mentors will continue with the established collaborations is assisting their research activities at their SE Asian universities.

Professors Glen Davis and Patrick Brennan are the chief investigators of the research project.

The group will stay for two weeks of intensive training “to amplify their particular research interests when they go back to their home country” said Professor Davis.

“This is our way of building research bridges with emerging career researchers with their supervisors and mentors from the countries they’re coming from.”

University of Sydney Master of Exercise Physiology

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition and pharmacology, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 1, 2015

Apply to the University of Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences!

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Find out more about studying the Master of Exercise Physiology and other health sciences at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.