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Articles categorized as ‘University of Sydney Health Sciences’

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

10 reasons to study rehabilitation counselling

Thinking about a career in rehabilitation counselling, but not sure if it’s right for you?

Rehabilitation counselling is a dynamic, challenging and rewarding allied health profession that is grounded in social justice, human rights, community inclusion and the value and importance of work. A career in this area often draws on knowledge from several fields, including philosophy, psychology, sociology, medicine, education, community development, and law.

10 reasons to study rehabilitation counselling

Study rehabilitation counselling at the University of Sydney

Here are the top 10 reasons to study rehabilitation counselling at the University of Sydney.

1. Make a real difference to people’s lives

As a rehabilitation counsellor, you will assist diverse clientele, including people with physical and mental health conditions, with chronic pain, experiencing homelessness, drug and alcohol issues, and people who are at risk, such as refugees.

The University of Sydney‘s postgraduate program in rehabilitation counselling sets you up to provide life-changing support to help people achieve maximum participation in employment and community life through assessment, counselling, service provision and support.

“I have always seen rehabilitation counselling as the most well rounded, and grounded, of the allied health disciplines. It encompasses elements of positive psychology and biopsychosocial models, with a combined focus on vocation, ability, mental health, community engagement and case management.” Louise Bilato, Private Practice

2. You’ll be highly employable

The University of Sydney is ranked no. 1 in Australia and fourth in the world for graduate employability.* Many Sydney Uni students secure positions in the field while still in the program and the employment rate of graduates has consistently been 100% for a number of years.

With government investment in person-centred service models, for example the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), increasing, the demand and range of opportunities for rehabilitation counsellors will rise for years to come.

“I obtained employment as a rehabilitation counsellor through my final placement at the University of Sydney and there has never been a shortage of work in this field. It has offered my family security since the day I graduated and it has been easy to transfer from one role to another due the variety of skills learnt from this course.”  Sam Antonas, Workplace Injury

3. Open doors to a wide range of career options

Graduates work in a variety of settings, including

  • advocacy and policy;
  • community-based rehabilitation;
  • community mental health;
  • disability management;
  • disability-specific community support services and centres;
  • life insurance and long-term care;
  • private consultant (vocational rehabilitation, career counselling, forensic); and
  • workers’ compensation.

“For the past twenty-two years I have worked as a rehabilitation counsellor in a range of industries. This course has provided me with a set of skills that I could take to occupational rehabilitation, human resources and injury management. I am enjoying being able to choose work that I am interested in and where I can balance work and life.” James Hill, private consultant

4. Gain experience working on real-life problems

As a rehabilitation counselling student at the University of Sydney, you will get to work on real cases, real problems and real solutions from day one of the program. You will complete a number of clinical and professional fieldwork opportunities across both the public and private sectors, enabling you to apply your knowledge and gain first-hand experience.

The university also has its own skill clinic, providing a physical space for students to practice their counselling skills under peer review and professional supervision.

“It’s an exciting time to be associated with the profession, with an opportunity to create some very positive noise in this space. Our skill set has great applicability in areas much broader than what is ever initially realised, and it is only self-limiting if you let it be.” Stuart Wing, Recovre

5. Choose from a range of specialisations

Select from a variety of specialisation tracks or develop your own in consultation with the course director. Popular topics include psychiatric rehabilitation, forensic assessment, substance abuse, at-risk populations, developmental/cognitive impairment disabilities, and chronic pain.

“Currently I work for Juvenile Justice as the Senior Practice Officer, which means I do a lot of internal consultancy, training and development. I like working with involuntary clients because it brings a whole gamut of challenges and really improves your skill level quickly. The most rewarding part is when an involuntary client almost becomes voluntary and they start engaging in treatment and actually wanting to achieve goals on their case plans.” Tim Warton, Juvenile Justice

6. Engage in international learning opportunities

The University of Sydney recruits and supports international students to study in the program and they cultivate international opportunities for Australian students. You will work in international policy and practice and action research projects with our regional partners in Asia and the Pacific Islands. The University of Sydney also offers a study abroad program that our students can pursue.

“My position involves leading the implementation of the community based rehabilitation program for geographically and culturally diverse districts of Nepal in close collaboration with self-help groups, disabled people’s organisations, government and non-government structures. I facilitate inclusion of more than 2,500 persons with disabilities and their families based on their needs in health (treatment, rehabilitation and assitive devices), education, livelihood/income generation activities and social empowerment.” Samridhi Rana Thapa, Karuna Foundation Nepal

7. Choose from two learning options

The University of Sydney offers two courses in rehabilitation counselling:

The graduate diploma focuses on the knowledge and skills required to enter the workforce as a strengths-based, solutions-focused case manager in the context of workers’ compensation.

The master’s course builds on the knowledge and skills gained in the graduate diploma where you will study the science of rehabilitation counselling practice, community-based inclusive development and issues of policy and systems change. You will gain broader experience in specialised applications with the opportunity to move into a management or leadership position.

“The foundational rehabilitation counselling skills that I have learnt are helping me in my role in health. The broad skills of communication, counselling and transferable skills analysis are very relevant to the human resources field. When combined with skills and knowledge of work, health and safety, workers compensation and employment of people with disabilities, rehabilitation counselling is a very transferable skill set.” Raychel Davis, NSW Health

8. Gain professional accreditation

The university’s rehabilitation counselling courses are accredited programs that enable you to work in a range of settings in Australia. Your professional skills are recognised by employers overseas.

“This course has provided me with the skills and qualifications enabling me to live and work in London as a Vocational Rehabilitation Counsellor for the National Health Service and be recognised as a professional member of the Vocational Rehabilitation Association (VRA) in the UK, which has been great to have on my resume.” Stacey Chapman, ANZ OnePath

9. You’ll join a diverse community

The University of Sydney actively seeks and supports a diverse student group where you will enjoy the richness of social learning and learn from other students’ experiences. The school integrates cultural competency into counselling theory and practice and teach community inclusion by example.

“I currently work for Mission Australia as the Homelessness Programs Specialist. I hope to challenge stigma, and to influence social policy, funding and reporting in service delivery, and ultimately change the way that we address homelessness as a community.” Erin Fearn, Mission Australia

10. Learn from leaders in the field

This rehabilitation counselling program is based on evidence, excellence and innovation. Sydney teaches leadership by example and are at the centre of the international discussion on the global identity of rehabilitation counselling. The current head of discipline has led efforts to organise rehabilitation counselling educators in Australia as a collective voice for professional advocacy.

*QS Graduate Employability Rankings 2018.

About the Master of Rehabilitation Counselling at the University of Sydney

During this two-year degree, you will be taught by leading academics as you learn how to provide specialist counselling, rehabilitation, and case management services to people who have experienced injury, disability or social disadvantage. You will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge in specialist areas of mental health, alcohol and drug misuse, developmental disability, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), public offenders, or other interest areas as approved by the Course Director.

As part of your studies, you will also complete a number of clinical and professional fieldwork opportunities across both the public and private sectors which will enable you to practically apply your knowledge and gain firsthand experience. As a graduate-entry program, this course is designed to accommodate all suitably qualified candidates regardless of their previous discipline. However, a formal background in psychology, rehabilitation, or related subjects is desirable.

Program: Master of Rehabilitation Counselling
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of 3 months prior to the program start date

Apply to the Master of Rehabilitation Counselling at the University of Sydney!

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Learn more about how you can study the Master of Rehabilitation Counselling at the University of Sydney! Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

University of Sydney ranks number one in sport, physiotherapy and rehabilitation

The University of Sydney has been ranked first in the world in the recently released 2017 QS subject rankings for the new category that comprises physical therapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation.

University of Sydney ranks number one in sport, physiotherapy and rehabilitation

Deputy Dean (Strategy) Prof Michelle Lincoln, Dean Prof Kathryn Refshauge, and Deputy Dean (Academic) Prof Sharon Kilbreath celebrate the news (Photo: University of Sydney)

The subject areas are encompassed by a range of disciplines within the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

“We are enormously proud to have been recognised in this way by our peers in academia and employers of our graduates,” said Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences Professor Kathryn Refshauge.

The QS subject rankings score universities around the world on their reputation with employers and academics, as well as measuring the productivity and citation impact of the publications of academics (also called the ‘H-Index’) as an institution and citations per research paper.

“The QS rankings are a particularly rich ranking system because it takes into account all aspects of our work: education, research and employability of our graduates.

“These rankings reflect performance across the whole faculty, from professional staff to academics to students,” said Professor Refshauge.

The Faculty of Health Sciences offers a range of undergraduate and graduate entry courses in the disciplines included in the ranking category, such as exercise and sport science, exercise physiology, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology.

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Are you interested in studying at the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com for more information about your study options.

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

University of Sydney Health Sciences Information Sessions

University of Sydney rehab sciences seminar tonight at University of Toronto

Attend a Sydney Health Sciences Seminar

Would you like to further your studies in physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology or another health science field?

Attend an upcoming University of Sydney Health Sciences information session between March 28 and 30 and get your questions answered!

Venue: University of Toronto, Bahen Centre, Room 2175
Date: Tuesday, March 28
Time: 6 p.m.

Venue: Simon Fraser University, Halpern Centre, Room 114
Date: Wednesday, March 29
Time: 5 p.m.

Venue: University of British Columbia, Woodward Building, Room 3
Date: Thursday, March 30
Time: 5 p.m.

Be sure to RSVP for a Sydney Health Sciences Information Session!

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Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?

Are you interested in health sciences? You’ve got a wonderful selection of study areas to choose from: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology…. But have you considered exercise and sports science?

Sydney Health Sciences is known for world-leading health sciences education and research. The discipline of exercise and sport science focuses on the integration of exercise and physical activity into health care, sports performance, disease prevention and rehabilitation.

Graduates have the opportunity to utilise principles such as biomechanics, musculoskeletal rehabilitation and gait analysis to evaluate and improve the performance of a diverse range of athletes.

The career paths followed by graduates are many and varied and depend mostly on the specific interests and aspirations of the individual. Broadly defined, the areas of employment entered by recent graduates include the sport industry, fitness industry, health industry, occupational health and safety, public health, rehabilitation, research and technology, education and medical insurance.

University of Sydney Master of Exercise Physiology

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?

Dr Ollie Jay is the Director of the Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory and a Senior Lecturer in Thermoregulatory Physiology at the Faculty of Health Sciences. (Photo: University of Sydney)

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA

Apply to the University of Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences!

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Find out more about studying the Master of Exercise Physiology at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 13th, 2016

Donation helps construction of University of Sydney Health Precinct

The University of Sydney has received a $35-million gift from the Susan and Isaac Wakil Foundation.  In 2015 the Wakils gave an unprecedented $10.8 million to Sydney Nursing School to establish 12 annual nursing scholarships, bringing their total university giving to nearly $46 million.

University of Sydney Health Precinct

Isaac and Susan Wakil have made a $35 million donation to the university (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The gift will enable construction of the main building within the University of Sydney’s proposed Health Precinct. For the first time multiple health disciplines will come together in a purpose-built facility to translate research into education and clinical services.

“We were inspired by the radical and innovative approach the University of Sydney is taking to address immediate and future healthcare challenges,’’ Mr Wakil said. “Susan and I are pleased to be able to make this project a reality.”

Chancellor Belinda Hutchinson AM highlights the impact the Wakil’s donation will have on the community.  “Susan and Isaac Wakil’s incredible generosity will harness greater collaboration between all the health faculties to deliver better healthcare to millions of people,” said the Chancellor. “The next generation of health professionals must meet the challenges in healthcare in Australia and internationally with training that supports innovative, multidisciplinary team-based clinical care.”

The Susan Wakil Health Building will co-locate the faculties of Nursing and Midwifery and Health Sciences, with components of Medicine, Pharmacy and Dentistry. It will provide state of the art clinical simulation programs and a multi-service clinic, as well as flexible infrastructure that supports team-based research programs.

“Thanks to the Wakil’s extraordinary gift, we can provide a hub for students of the health disciplines where knowledge and skills are shared and developed across the faculties,” said Vice-Chancellor and Principal Dr Michael Spence. “The Health Precinct is being designed on the successful multi-disciplinary model of the Charles Perkins Centre. By combining knowledge across disciplines, we can translate research into real-world outcomes.”

Susan and Isaac Wakil’s incredible generosity will harness greater collaboration between all the health faculties to deliver better healthcare to millions of people.

In further recognition of the gift, the Faculty of Nursing will be named “The University of Sydney Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery.” The university will also name the professorship held by the Dean of the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery as “The Susan Wakil Dean’s Professorship of Nursing and Midwifery” while a second professorship will be called “The Susan and Isaac Wakil Professorship of Healthy Ageing,” in recognition of both donors.

Honorary Associate Professor Ross Steele AM is a longstanding friend of the Wakils and introduced them to the work being done at the University of Sydney. “I’m delighted to have helped connect the Wakil’s desire to support Australia’s healthcare system with the university’s visionary approach to health research and education.”

The Wakils’ gift is the largest donation to the University of Sydney since it was founded in 1850. The campaign to support the University of Sydney is the most successful fundraising campaign in Australian higher education history, having raised more than $600 million via philanthropic donations, two years ahead of schedule.

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Would you like more information about the programs offered at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, November 9th, 2015

University of Sydney Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health subjects rank well

The University of Sydney was placed second in Australia and 33rd globally in the Times Higher Education subject rankings for Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health. This high rank is driven by strong performance in citations and research reputation.

Sydney Dental School

Study at the University of Sydney

This subject area encompasses the Sydney Medical School and includes significant contributions from the faculties of Science, Health Sciences, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing.

The university has consistently ranked within the top 50 universities globally in Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health in the Times Higher Education rankings since 2011.

The Times Higher Education made significant changes to their methodology this year, but the University of Sydney continues to remain securely within the top 50 institutions globally.

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Would you like more information about the programs offered at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

University of Sydney embarks on epic health education challenge

It’s not often that pharmacy and exercise physiology students share a classroom, but the University of Sydney is breaking new ground in interprofessional learning aimed at mimicking the real-life cases of Australians struggling with heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

More than 1,300 health professional students came together in September for the Health Collaboration Challenge, an innovative learning activity designed to provide health and medical students with the chance to work in multidisciplinary teams.

University of Sydney Pharmacy School

L – R: Sarah Standen and team mates Tsang (Pharmacy), Deborah (Medicine), Nicholas (Medicine) and Tram (Nursing) (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

“We are the only university in Australia that offers such a broad range of health disciplines and this initiative allows us to capitalise on that by giving students the opportunity to gain a better understanding of each other’s professions and how they work together,” said Professor Pip Pattison, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education).

Over three days students from nursing, medicine, pharmacy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, physiotherapy, diagnostic radiography and exercise physiology took part in team-building activities and competed in teams of six to devise a management plan for a patient with complex health needs. Each team was required to produce a five-minute video and one page abstract that demonstrates their management plan for their patient, and to peer evaluate each other’s work.

“Your patient cases are going to look messy because that’s what real life is like and you are going to need to work together to solve it,” said Dr Christopher Gordon in his opening remarks to students.

Master of Exercise Physiology student Sarah Standen said the challenge was different to any learning activity she had ever taken part in.

“It’s a really different way to learn and helps us understand how best to work with patients when they have other issues outside our professional scope,” said Sarah.

University of Sydney Pharmacy School

L – R: Associate Professor Chen, Dr Nisbet, Dr Gordon and Associate Professor Jorm overseeing the final day of challenge (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The initiative was developed by Associate Professor Timothy Chen, Dr Christopher Gordon, Associate Professor Christine Jorm, Dr Gillian Nisbet, and Associate Professor Christopher Roberts under a University of Sydney Educational Innovation Grant.

The grant, together with support from Sydney e-learning, enabled both the 2015 delivery and developmental work to make this a sustainable learning activity for the university. The academics even hope to expand the program to include students from dietetics, social work and psychology in 2016.

Bachelor of Pharmacy Program at Sydney Pharmacy School

The Bachelor of Pharmacy program provides students with the core skills and knowledge required for the effective delivery of pharmaceutical care and the ability to proceed to research. Students will study the chemical, physical, pharmaceutical, and pharmacological properties of medicinal substances and the application of these in the pharmacy profession. The Faculty of Pharmacy has an enviable national and international reputation that means students will study and interact with world-renowned academics and enjoy access to best practice teaching laboratories and cutting-edge technology.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: January 31, 2016; however, it is recommended that Canadian students apply as early as possible to provide time for the pre-departure process.

Apply to Sydney Pharmacy School!

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Do you have questions about Sydney Pharmacy School and about studying pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free at Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, October 2nd, 2015

Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences students get a taste for research

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students at the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Health Sciences have a unique opportunity to gain hands-on research experience as part of a new scholarship program.

University of Sydney Physiotherapy School

Scholarship recipients Amy Large and Sarah Hawker working on the 1000 Norms Project in the Sydney Performance Lab (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Four of the best and brightest Indigenous students have taken part in the program which allows them to spend four weeks during study break working on the day-to-day running of an academic research project of their choice.

Program Coordinator Dr John Gilroy and Mrs Simone Cherie-Holt said the faculty attracts some very bright Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, but many don’t understand the research process and opportunities to progress onto honours, masters or PhD programs.

“The scholarships provide opportunities for our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to experience research early on and gain a better appreciation for what it can do for their careers as health professionals,” said Dr Gilroy.

The Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences has a long history of supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students through the Yooroang Garang Indigenous Student Support Unit, and has graduated 79 Indigenous allied health students between 1992 and 2014.

Indigenous student support officer Simone-Cherie Holt said many students had never considered research as a career or development opportunity before hearing about the scholarship program.

“This program is important because even if students don’t choose to keep going formally in academia, they will leave with a better understanding of research and how to implement it, which makes them better health practitioners,” said Mrs Cherie-Holt.

Physiotherapy students Scott Daley, Cameron Edward, Sarah Large and Amy Hawker are the first to be awarded the scholarship. All chose to work on the 1000 Norms Project with researchers Marnee McKay and Jennifer Baldwin.

Ms McKay said she is impressed with the professionalism and work-ethic of the students and encourages other academics to consider becoming involved in the program.

The scholarship program is an initiative of the Faculty of Health Sciences, funded by the University of Sydney’s Wingara Mura – Bunga Barrabugu strategy which aims to improve the engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in all areas of university life.

University of Sydney’s Master of Physiotherapy

The University of Sydney offers a two year, graduate-entry Master of Physiotherapy program, which is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in a related field and who wish to gain the requirements to become a physiotherapist. Coursework throughout this program builds on the major areas of the profession, such as musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary and neurological physiotherapy, as well as looking at the profession in its societal context.

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March each year

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Discover more about Sydney Physiotherapy School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at 1-866-698-7355 or jaime@oztrekk.com and find out how you can study in Australia!

Monday, September 14th, 2015

Health benefits of dog ownership explored in new research node

Man’s best friend is set to become his lab partner, with the launch of a research node on the health effects of dog ownership at the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre.

In collaboration with the RSPCA NSW, the dog ownership node brings together experts in public health, physical activity and exercise, disease prevention, behaviour change, health psychology, human-animal interactions, and canine health.

Researchers hope the node will shed light on not only how dog ownership influences human health, but also on how these benefits could be harnessed as part of the health care system.

University of Sydney Health Sciences

Sydney researchers will explore the psychological and psychosocial benefits of dog ownership

“Fragmented research has indicated the benefits of dog ownership on health, and in particular on physical activity through dog walking, but it has so far failed to provide a body of evidence on the extent of these benefits, and how and why they occur,” said node leader Associate Professor Manos Stamatakis, from the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

“We know that dogs can be not only a catalyst for physical activity, which is a major health issue in our society, but dog ownership can also address social isolation; the lack of connection between humans.

“What we want to understand is why these benefits occur. Is it because of the ownership itself, or because there is another mechanism that mediates this, like walking or companionship?”

The node is one of the world’s first coordinated, comprehensive research efforts in the field, and is the first to make interventions in human health its top priority.

With one of the world’s highest rates of dog ownership, Australia is uniquely positioned to take advantage of the health benefits of owning a dog.

Thirty-nine per cent of Australian households own a dog, and of these around two-thirds are estimated to be under-walked. Interventions designed to increase dog walking could therefore have a marked impact on human health.

Along with physical activity, researchers will also explore the psychological and psychosocial benefits of dog ownership, which are becoming increasingly important as the population ages.

“We know that with older age comes increasing isolation, and with that comes loneliness. It’s a major cardiovascular disease risk factor, it’s a major cancer risk factor, and it’s a major risk factor for depression,” Associate Professor Stamatakis said.

“One aspect of human isolation can be addressed simply by owning a dog, because of their companionship, unconditional acceptance and love that humans often do not get from other people.

“The second aspect is that the dog can be a catalyst to tighten human social connections and increase networks.”

According to Brendon Neilly, RSPCA NSW’s Executive Manager of Animal Care Services, the data produced by the Charles Perkins Centre’s dog ownership node could be used to make significant advances in human and animal health, with a potential path cleared for dogs to be used as part of the health care system.

“We could say to people like health care providers, public transport providers, rental accommodation owners, local governments, nursing homes and community groups that it’s not just anecdotal and it’s not just about letting people keep pets,” Mr Neilly said.

“If we can demonstrate a physiological measure, a genuine value, we can make real improvements to quality of life. And that’s for both owners and pets.”

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Wondering what it’s like to study at the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences? Contact OzTREKK!

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

Sydney Health Sciences students play for Disability Awareness Week

Students from the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences will compete against the professionals in a friendly match at the university’s Cumberland campus to raise awareness of the Pave the Way campaign on Sept. 3 and highlight Disability Awareness Week from Sept. 7 – 11.

Cumberland Student Guild Vice President and fourth-year physiotherapy student representative Hui San said the players felt really connected with the aims of the Pave the Way campaign.

University of Sydney Physiotherapy School

Sydney Health Sciences students will play for Disability Awareness Week

“It aims to support students with physical barriers and help fund research that will improve the health and well-being of people of all needs and abilities,” she said.

Pave the Way is a 24-hour fundraising and awareness campaign and the University of Sydney‘s second annual giving day and the only challenge of its kind at any Australian university.

One of the areas being supported by Pave the Way is the bursary fund for students with disabilities who experience short-term financial hardship.

Rhys Baxter from the NSW Institute of Sport (NSWIS) said he loved attending the university to teach students about wheelchair basketball.”We’re grateful that the student community here at Cumberland campus were so keen to show their support and get involved.”

Sydney Uni Wheel Kings player and Wheelchair Sports NSW representative Rick Engles explained wheelchair basketball—which is open to male and female athletes with permanent physical impairment to their lower limbs—is one of the major disabled sports practiced today.

“The game retains most key rules and scoring of basketball, including the ten-foot basketball hoop and standard basketball court,” he said.

“Players are assigned a point value from 1 to 4.5 according to their level of physical function, and teams may not exceed 14 points for the five players on court.”

NSWIS athlete and national wheelchair basketball team member Hannah Dodd said the event was also a chance for students to get a better understanding of what being in a wheelchair was like.

“Opportunities like this, where students can get in the wheelchairs and experience sports like wheelchair basketball firsthand, help our future physios and occupational therapists to be better at their jobs. They’re more empathetic to the needs of people and athletes with disabilities,” she said.

University of Sydney Master of Physiotherapy

The University of Sydney offers a two-year graduate-entry Master of Physiotherapy program, which is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in a related field and who wish to gain the requirements to become a physiotherapist.

Coursework throughout this program builds on the major areas of the profession, such as musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary and neurological physiotherapy, as well as looking at the profession in its societal context.

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: October 1, 2015

Apply to the University of Sydney Master of Physiotherapy

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Learn more about the Sydney Physiotherapy School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.