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Articles categorized as ‘University of Newcastle Health Sciences’

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

University of Newcastle PhD candidate wins emerging researcher award

The Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) has presented its 2016 Emerging Researcher Award to Li Keng Chai, who is an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) and PhD candidate at the University of Newcastle.

Ms Chai received the award for her research examining the differences between the dietary intakes of young children aged 2 – 3 years and the Australian nutrition recommendations, for that age group, of the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE).

UON PhD candidate wins emerging researcher award

Study health sciences at UON

The award, for the best research article from a first time author in DAA’s journal Nutrition & Dietetics, was announced at the Association’s National Conference in Melbourne.

Ms Chai’s research found that no child achieved all targets set by the AGHE, with the majority of children consuming only half of recommended servings for breads/cereals and for vegetables.

She also found young children were taking in around 50 per cent more dairy servings and 30 per cent more fruit servings than the AGHE recommends.

Despite dietary intakes not meeting AGHE targets, Ms Chai’s analysis found a variety of dietary intakes still allowed children to meet recommendations for individual vitamins and minerals. Her research showed children also met requirements for carbohydrate, protein and fat, although nearly all exceeded recommendations for saturated fat intake.

“Healthy eating in childhood is essential to provide energy and nutrients for growth and development and to reduce the risk of chronic disease later in life. The AGHE outlines a dietary intake pattern that meets vitamin, mineral and macronutrient recommendations. But my research shows there are alternative dietary patterns that are also able to meet the requirements of this age group,” said Ms Chai.

“Nutrition recommendations are based on the best evidence currently available, providing a framework for healthy eating. Ms Chai’s research will help to build knowledge and potentially shape future nutrition guidelines,” said DAA President Liz Kellett.

According to Ms Kellett, Ms Chai was the standout applicant when assessed against the award criteria of research quality, clarity of communication, and potential contribution to health/advancing the evidence base in nutrition and dietetics.

“I am very delighted to receive this award from the DAA. This recognition would not have happened without the continuous support from my dedicated colleagues and supervisors. It’s a great pleasure for our research to be honoured by the peak organisation of dietetic and nutrition professionals. This award has given me a great deal of confidence to produce more high-quality research,” said Ms Chai.

DAA’s Emerging Researcher Award is proudly supported by the Nestlé Nutrition Institute. Ms Chai will receive a cheque for $1,000 and a complimentary pass to the DAA National Conference.

School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle

The School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle excels in the teaching and learning of allied health professionals, and offers study with a strong clinical focus in the eleven health professions represented within the school.

The school has specialized teaching laboratories for programs at both the Newcastle and Central Coast campuses. Students learn and refine their practical skills required for professional practice in these laboratories prior to undertaking clinical or other professional placements.

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Learn more about studying nutrition and dietetics and other health sciences at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

University of Newcastle welcomes NSW Government support for Central Coast health and well-being precinct

The University of Newcastle (UON) has warmly welcomed the NSW Government’s announcement that it has earmarked $20 million for new health and medical education and research facilities for the Central Coast.

With partners, the university will continue to work with the Commonwealth to secure the balance of the required investment. If funding is secured, the transformational project will create a new centre of excellence in Gosford that will be regionally focused, and globally engaged.

University of Newcastle Nursing School

Learn more about nursing and health sciences at the University of Newcastle

The proposed new Precinct will contain a Central Coast Medical School—based on UON’s existing medical school—and an affiliated Health and Medical Research Institute on the site of the redeveloping Gosford Hospital. These new facilities would deliver up to $72.5 million of capital investment to the Central Coast, and be a catalyst for enhanced integrated healthcare, research and innovation, and new opportunities for the whole region.

The project’s benefits include

  • economic impact of $209 million for the regional economy over 10 years.
  • 765 new jobs for the Central Coast.
  • a brand new health and medical education and research precinct delivering new regionally trained doctors, nurses and allied health practitioners.
  • a major boost to the Coast’s knowledge economy, retaining and attracting investment and talent to the region.

Reflecting on the University of Newcastle’s commitment to allocate 30 of its existing medical places to the project, and to invest up to $20 million capital, UON Vice-Chancellor Professor Caroline McMillen said the project was a boost for the Coast.

“We are delighted to welcome the NSW Government’s support for this project. UON has been the Central Coast’s university for 27 years, and we remain committed to building opportunity and driving innovation in the region.

“This new proposal is distinctive because it can deliver outcomes and benefits quickly: no new medical places are required, and UON already delivers excellent medical, nursing and allied health programs and conducts world-class research,” said Professor McMillen. Federal Member for Robertson, Lucy Wicks MP, who has championed the project, said the announcement was fantastic news.

“I’ve been fighting for funding for two years for this medical research institute and medical school in Gosford. I’m so delighted the NSW Government has delivered,and I will keep fighting, whether it takes one year or 20 years, to see this opportunity become a reality.”

“This is about creating a region of world class excellence, aspiration and innovation on the Central Coast,” said Ms Wicks.

UON is ranked in the top 300 universities worldwide, and in the top 8 universities in Australia for funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). UON’s nursing discipline was ranked in the top 100 by QS World University Subject Rankings 2016.

University of Newcastle Nursing School

The University of Newcastle Nursing School has an innovative approach to undergraduate and graduate teaching, and enjoys close collaboration with local area health services in providing clinical learning experiences for students, in the provision of graduate programs and in the conduct of clinical research. The school strives to prepare and develop nurses to function in a wide range of clinical settings, occupational health facilities and rehabilitation services.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline candidates are encouraged to submit their applications before the end of September for the February intake.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Nursing School!

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Find out more about studying nursing. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

UoN nutrition researchers use smartphone technology to study pregnancy diets

With little being known about the diets of expectant Indigenous mums, University of Newcastle nutrition researchers are using smartphone technology to gather firsthand insights and provide personalised feedback.

University of Newcastle Health Sciences

University of Newcastle nutrition researchers are using smartphone technology

They are currently recruiting for a study titled “Diet Bytes & Baby Bumps,” which began at the Gomeroi Gaaynggal Centre in Tamworth and has since been extended to the University of Newcastle‘s Callaghan campus.

“The method we’ve developed allows pregnant women to use their smartphone to photograph the food they’re about to eat and tag it with either a voice or text annotation,” nutrition and dietetics lecturer Dr Megan Rollo said.

“We are getting rich information like recipes and ingredients, as the voice record allows them to be more descriptive. This is sent to a dietitian for analysis and we provide feedback via a short video message, along with a follow-up phone call with the dietitian.”

In addition to the digital recording, participants are also measured with a food frequency questionnaire and 24-hour recall survey. This approach is less tedious than a traditional written food diary where people have to weigh and measure their food.

With expectant mums monitored for 12 weeks in their first or second trimester, Tamworth-based PhD candidate Amy Ashman said a number of early recruits had since given birth to healthy babies.

“The study is unique because we’re using this innovative method to capture the diets of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous women. It’s especially important as there is limited information regarding Indigenous women’s diets during this important life stage,” Ms Ashman said

Participants receive one-to-one advice based on current dietary guidelines, covering the basic food groups and the key nutrients for pregnancy—such as iron, folate, zinc, calcium and iodine.

School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle

The School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle excels in the teaching and learning of allied health professionals, and offers study with a strong clinical focus in the eleven health professions represented within the school.

The School of Health Sciences has specialized teaching laboratories for programs at both the Newcastle and Central Coast campuses. Students learn and refine their practical skills required for professional practice in these laboratories prior to undertaking clinical or other professional placements.

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Would you like more information about studying nutrition and dietetics and other health sciences at the University of Newcastle? Contact OzTREKK at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

New University of Newcastle building set to grow rural health workforce

The University of Newcastle’s (UON) $19.4 million Tamworth Education Centre is a state-of-the-art education and research hub designed to increase the skills and capacity of the region’s health workforce.

Supported by Commonwealth funding, the centre was opened recently by Senator John Williams and University of Newcastle Vice-Chancellor, Professor Caroline McMillen.

Professor McMillen said the Tamworth Education Centre was an investment in the future New England health workforce, providing a technology rich learning environment for tomorrow’s health professionals.

“The Tamworth Education Centre is equipped to provide students with a next-generation learning experience. High definition video-conferencing and tele-health capabilities connect UON staff and students with other campuses and partners across the world.”

The new centre is home to the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health (UoNDRH) – a leading education and research hub. The centre will provide laboratory, tutorial and study facilities for students in nursing, medicine and a range of health science programs including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nutrition and dietetics, social work, speech therapy and medical radiation science.

The Education Centre also increases UON’s capacity to enhance its support for clinical placements, with an upgrade to existing UoNDRH facilities at the Tamworth Rural Referral Hospital and additional onsite accommodation for more than 50 students.

“Clinical placements are a core component of our world-class health education degree programs, providing the opportunity for students to put the valuable theory they have learned in the classroom into real world practice.  Last year, some 500 UON students completed a clinical placement in the Tamworth region,” Professor McMillen said.

“With Commonwealth support, we have refurbished the UoNDRH clinical training space in the Tamworth Rural Referral Hospital to include an extended clinical skills laboratory, tutorial rooms and a student hub area. This will encourage greater inter-disciplinary learning between local students and clinicians.”

The Tamworth Education Centre has been funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing and Health Workforce Australia. The project includes the refurbishment of the UoNDRH facilities within the Tamworth Rural Referral Hospital, which was funded by Health Workforce Australia.

If you are interested in nutrition and health, enjoy communicating with people and have an aptitude for science, an exciting future lies ahead when you become an accredited practicing dietitian or researcher.

You will learn the art of applying the science of human nutrition to help people understand the food and health relationships in their life. You will have the ability to contribute to the health of populations and the sustainability of the environment.

Students gain problem-solving and communication skills with studies in food, nutrition and dietetics, basic and applied sciences, social sciences and professional practice.

You will also have the chance to study electives according to your area of interest, such as sports nutrition.

The University of Newcastle’s courses combine theoretical and scientific knowledge with practical learning, to ensure that students will be prepared for a successful career in nutrition and dietetics.

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Find out more about studying nutrition and dietetics and other health sciences at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at 1-866-698-7355 or email rachel@oztrekk.com.

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Newcastle Health Sciences study targets high cholesterol

A nutrition research program called “Love your Food, Love Your Heart, Love Your Family,” which helped improve the diets of families with a history of heart disease or stroke, is now set to focus on individuals with high cholesterol levels.

University of Newcastle Health Sciences

How’s your diet?

Dietitians Tracy Schumacher and Professor Clare Collins from the University of Newcastle are recruiting throughout January for the Phase II study, aiming to help those who want to use lifestyle changes to reduce their cardiovascular risks.

It comes as doctors express concern that a number of patients have refrained from taking statin medication to reduce cholesterol levels in the wake of negative publicity.

Tracy Schumacher says there is no magic bullet or one-size-fits-all strategy in the intervention offered to Love your Food participants. It is simply about eating well across the board.

“We’re adding foods in, rather than kicking foods out,” she said. “There’s nothing off limits but there are certainly limits to the quantity you can eat.”

Research has shown that the “Mediterranean” and “Portfolio” diets are effective in maintaining low cholesterol. The former includes fruit and vegetables, grain, fish that are rich in Omega 3, dairy products and nuts, while the Portfolio has margarine enriched with plant sterols, oats, barley and eggplant, all high in soluble fibre.

Other heart healthy foods include legumes, kidney beans, chickpeas and soy products which are also favoured for being low in saturated fats.

“I give people samples to try out—some are quite experimental while others are more reluctant to change their eating habits,” the University of Newcastle dietician says.

“From the family-based study we’re seeing people being more mindful of what they put on their plates and they’ve also increased the variety of nutritious foods. We can start seeing better cholesterol results in six weeks, so that’s how long we want people to follow the program for.”

School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle

The School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle excels in the teaching and learning of allied health professionals, and offers study with a strong clinical focus in the eleven health professions represented within the school.

The School of Health Sciences has specialized teaching laboratories for programs at both the Newcastle and Central Coast campuses. Students learn and refine their practical skills required for professional practice in these laboratories prior to undertaking clinical or other professional placements.

Study areas include

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Find out more about University of Newcastle’s Health Sciences programs, and other health sciences programs at Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK to find out how you can study in Australia.

Friday, November 15th, 2013

University of Newcastle health sciences virtual weight loss clinic

University of Newcastle nutrition and dietetic researchers are trialling a new virtual weight loss clinic.

University of Newcastle Health Sciences

Study at the University of Newcastle

“With our ever-increasing work and family commitments, finding the time to see health professionals is becoming more challenging,” Chief Investigator Dr Megan Rollo from the University of Newcastle’s School of Health Sciences said.

“More and more Australians have access to the Internet and portable devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. These technologies may be the key to accessing the expertise and support of health professionals, such as dietitians.”

Developed in partnership with SP Health Co Pty Ltd and through funding from a New South Wales Trade and Investment TechVoucher grant, the virtual weight loss clinic will allow individuals to have real-time video consultations with a dietitian as part of a web-based weight loss platform.

The research team is in need of volunteers to test the new virtual clinic as part of a six week weight loss program. All participants will be given access to the web-based weight loss platform, ClickFit.

About the School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle

The School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle excels in the teaching and learning of health professionals. The school has a strong focus on valuing and applying multi-professional health education and practice to their teaching and research activities. Study within the school allows students to train as a health professional with strong skills to work in a multi-professional health care environment.

The School of Health Sciences has specialized teaching laboratories for programs at both the Newcastle and Central Coast campuses. Students learn and refine their practical skills required for professional practice in these laboratories prior to undertaking clinical or other professional placements. The laboratories contain modern diagnostic, treatment and other professional equipment, in addition to simulated work environments.

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Find out more about University of Newcastle’s Health Sciences programs, and other health sciences programs at Australian universities.

 

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

University of Newcastle gains OHS accreditation

The University of Newcastle has been awarded a five-year accreditation with the Australian Occupational Health and Safety Education Accreditation Board for its Master of Workplace Health and Safety program. As one of only five universities to meet the strict accreditation criteria, the University of Newcastle is helping to set the benchmark for occupational health and safety (OHS) education in Australia.

 University of Newcastle Health Sciences School

Learn more about health sciences programs at the University of Newcastle

“Through accreditation, the Australian OHS Education Accreditation Board recognizes those programs meeting high standards across a range of areas including information management, problem solving, communication skills and application skills,” said Program Convenor, Dr Carole James.

The accreditation will ensure students are well-equipped to navigate the diverse challenges of the workplace upon completion of their studies.

“The accreditation program aims to ensure our students develop advanced knowledge, critical understanding and problem solving approaches to the complex ranges of issues and processes associated with professional practice in OHS.”

“Our graduates will work in a variety of roles within the area of OHS, in positions of managerial or professional responsibility, through which they are required to develop policies and strategies in response to the OHS and workplace injury management needs of their organizations,” said Dr James.The Master of Workplace Health and Safety is a 120-unit postgraduate coursework program that provides training in occupational health, safety, injury management and rehabilitation. It can be completed wholly on-line as there is no requirement for on-campus attendance.

About the School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle

The School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle excels in the teaching and learning of health professionals. The school has a strong focus on valuing and applying multi-professional health education and practice to their teaching and research activities. Study within the school allows students to train as a health professional with strong skills to work in a multi-professional health care environment.

The School of Health Sciences has specialized teaching laboratories for programs at both the Newcastle and Central Coast campuses. Students learn and refine their practical skills required for professional practice in these laboratories prior to undertaking clinical or other professional placements. The laboratories contain modern diagnostic, treatment and other professional equipment, in addition to simulated work environments.

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Find out more about University of Newcastle’s Health Sciences programs, and other health sciences programs at Australian universities.

 

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

University of Newcastle to open Australia’s first simulation radiation therapy lab

Tomorrow is a big day at the University of Newcastle as the university will open Australia’s first radiation therapy simulation laboratory.

The new lab – the only one of its kind in Australia – completes the three-stage education cycle for students studying this life-saving treatment, by allowing students to be trained in the initial phase of radiation therapy: simulation.

Radiation therapy, part of the university’s Faculty of Health and School of Health Sciences, is one of the main treatment options for patients diagnosed with cancer and contributes greatly to the high cancer cure rates in Australia, the university reports.

Using anatomical and functional imaging studies to design courses of treatment for patients, radiation therapy encompasses three key stages – simulation, planning and treatment.

The university’s Callaghan campus already offers students a radiation therapy computer planning room and a 3-dimensional VERT (Virtual training) treatment facility, Newcastle said. The new $327,000 radiation therapy simulation laboratory, jointly funded by the university and the Australian Government’s Capital Expenditure and Health Workforce Australia funding, is fitted out with positioning lasers, optical distance illuminators and immobilization equipment, the university said.

Simulation is a process where radiation treatment fields were defined to allow radiation dose delivery to the tumour and at the same time reduce the dose to the normal surrounding tissue, according to radiation therapy lecturer, Yolanda Surjan.

“The new lab will create a realistic hospital environment for students to learn how to develop patient treatment set-ups including immobilization devices such as individualized masks used to ensure a patient remains in one position throughout the therapy to reduce the possibility of a ‘geographical miss’ during radiation delivery,” Surjan told the University of Newcastle.

“The simulation laboratory gives radiation therapy students exposure to simulation concepts before clinical placement where it can difficult to participate in simulation procedures because they are quite complex.”

The University of Newcastle is known as the largest trainer of radiation therapists in Australia. Furthermore, Surjan told the University of Newcastle that Newcastle is the only university in Australia to offer such comprehensive, hands-on experience to radiation therapy students.

The university’s radiation therapy computer planning room, with the latest comprehensive 3-dimensional treatment planning software was opened in 2006 and a VERT (Virtual Training) room, with a 3-dimensional Virtual Linear Accelerator, was officially opened a year ago, the university said.

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Find out more about studying radiation therapy and Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle! Learn more about how OzTREKK can help you study at internationally recognized Australian universities, like the University of Newcastle.

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

University of Newcastle serves up state-of-the-art food science laboratory

University of Newcastle serves up state-of-the-art food science laboratory

A $400,000 refurbishment of a food science laboratory at the University of Newcastle is complete, offering students a first-class training facility that mimics the professional environment of an industrial kitchen.

The purpose-built laboratory gives students from the University of Newcastle’s Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics program access to a professional space to hone their practical skills in food experimentation, preparation, and menu management.

Program convenor, Dr. Lesley MacDonald-Wicks, said the laboratory’s substantial refit and technology update allowed students to develop their skills by learning in a practical environment.

“We have tried to mimic as best we can an industrial kitchen to improve the student experience and train competent, work-ready graduates,” Dr. MacDonald-Wicks said.

“Students build up their awareness of foods and their nutritional components, including ways to combine foods effectively when preparing menus. Through practical exposure and guided activities, students are encouraged to experiment with menu management and gain an understanding of the importance of recipe modification for people with special dietary requirements.”

The University of Newcastle funded the laboratory upgrade. The teaching space will also be used by the Bachelor of Secondary Teaching (Technology) students who will learn skills including food demonstration, classroom management and food safety.

“Students in both fields are encouraged to develop a cultural appreciation of food and the role of food in the social and cultural contexts of our lives,” Dr. MacDonald-Wicks said.

 

About the University of Newcastle Bachelor of Food Science and Human Nutrition Program

The University of Newcastle Bachelor of Food Science and Human Nutrition gives students the opportunity to learn about what is happening at the leading edge of scientific endeavour in the field of food science and human nutrition, and become familiar with the latest areas such as molecular nutrition, nutritional genetics and functional foods. The degree develops specialist knowledge and skills that are highly valued and required in industry and the broader community.

This three-year degree provides a strong background in the principles underlying the sciences of food technology and human nutrition, including the basic sciences, the chemistry and biology of nutrients, and the attributes of foods, including food commodities and functional foods. The structure of the degree means students will study a series of core courses, which is combined with directed and elective courses based on your career interests. Core courses you will study include Chemistry, Food and nutrition, Biomedical science, Macronutrients, Micronutrients, Plant and animal food products, Food product development, Nutrition in health and disease, Food analysis and Functional foods and health claims.

The University of Newcastle continues to invest money in its programs and facilities, giving us another reason to be proud partners!

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Find out more about University of Newcastle Health Sciences Degrees.

Learn more about the University of Newcastle.