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Articles categorized as ‘Bond University Health Sciences’

Monday, July 24th, 2017

Bond University High Performance Centre wins international award

Bond University High Performance Training Centre (HPTC) has been awarded a 2017 Strength of America Award for its world-class strength and conditioning standards.

Bond’s HPTC was the only Centre in Australia to receive this prestigious accolade, which is jointly awarded by the US National Strength & Conditioning Association (NSCA) and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition.

Bond University High Performance Centre wins international award for strength and conditioning program

Bond University High Performance Training Centre awarded a 2017 Strength of America Award (Photo: Bond University)

The award—which represents the gold standard in strength and conditioning programs—measured the HTPC on four key criteria: Supervision, Education, Program, and Facilities.

Bond University’s HPTC Facility Manager Glenn Corcoran said the award recognises Bond’s success in creating safer programs and facilities for athletes.

“This Strength of America Award recognises Bond for providing world-class strength and conditioning services at the Bond Institute of Health & Sport (BIHS), which is also home to leading research and programs in the disciplines of exercise and sports science, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and nutrition and dietetics,” Mr Corcoran said.

“Our strength and conditioning programs assist young athletes from Bond Sport and the entire Gold Coast region to become the best they can be, by providing world-class, evidence-based practices, delivered by highly qualified professionals in a facility that is second to none.”

Bond University Head of Exercise and Sports science, Professor Peter Reaburn said the award also put the university’s facility front and centre on the world stage.

“Bond’s exercise and sport science students are very fortunate to be educated not just in world-class facilities, but by some of the best qualified strength and conditioning staff in Australia.

“In the past twelve months we’ve seen considerable growth in the use of Bond’s HTPC as a teaching and training hub for national and international athletes and professional sporting organisations, including Triathlon Australia, Singapore Rugby Womens 7s and the Australian Strength & Conditioning Association, to name just a few,” said Professor Reaburn.

“Bond’s reputation as not just the Gold Coast’s but Australia’s ‘facility of choice’ for elite competition preparation is spreading, and this Strength of America award strongly reinforces our position as a leading international facility.”

The NSCA’s Head Strength and Conditioning Coach Scott Caulfield said the NSCA and the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition were working together to provide all centres with concise guidelines.

“I am proud to have Bond University High Performance Training Centre be part of our ongoing mission to improve the education and programs for all our youth,” Mr Caulfield said.

The NSCA is the recognised peak body in International athlete preparation in the United States.

The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition is the peak US government body for health and fitness.

About the Master of Sports Science at Bond University

The Bond University Master of Sports Science is designed to develop specialist knowledge and skills relating to strength and conditioning and high performance science of elite athletes. This unique program places a strong emphasis on comprehensive practical experience and industry immersion, including a two semester full-time professional internship under the mentorship of a sports scientist.

Completed in only 1 year and 4 months (4 semesters), the first two semesters are comprised of specialist on-campus coursework, followed by the internship which incorporates applied sports science /strength and conditioning practice and a research component. This internship is completed full-time for 2 semesters, at a minimum of 500 hours with an elite sport organisation. Bond University has affiliations with national and international elite sporting organisations and professional sports teams.

Program: Master of Sports Science
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Intakes: January and May
Duration: 1 year and 4 months

Apply to the Bond University sports sciences program!

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Learn more about studying sports science at Bond University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, March 11th, 2016

Bond health sciences research identifies likely cause of common elite cricket injury

New Australian-first research from Bond University has shown that while elite cricketers play much more intensely, their hamstring strength is no greater than that of school level players, which is potentially causing the high number of hamstring injuries seen at the game’s top level.

Bond Health Sciences

Bond researchers are studying hamstring strain injuries in cricketers (Photo credit: Bond University)

Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are the most prominent form of injury in professional cricket, evidenced by Aaron Finch who was recently sidelined by a hamstring injury that saw him lose the Australian Twenty20 team captaincy to Steve Smith ahead of the World T20 in India this month.

The recently published study from Bond University—led by Masters of Research student Wade Chalker and Associate Professor Justin Keogh from Bond’s Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine—compared the eccentric hamstring strength and hamstring strength asymmetries of elite, sub-elite and school-level cricket players and found no significant difference across the three groups.

The research, which encompassed 16 participants from the Queensland Bulls, looked at the eccentric hamstring strength of 74 male bowlers and batters and found no difference between the three distinct skill levels nor a difference between playing positions.

Following these findings Mr Chalker spent 11 weeks with the Queensland Bulls during pre-season to improve their eccentric hamstring strength through specialised training, which ultimately saw the team reduce its number of HSIs suffered by players from six injuries in the previous season, to just one in the 2014–2015 season.

Mr Chalker said the findings clearly suggested that a lack of eccentric hamstring strength may be the major risk factor behind why so many professional cricketers are sidelined by HSIs.

“Our research sought to identify trends and factors that may be causing elite players to suffer hamstring strains more frequently than junior players,” he said.

“Comparing the hamstring strength of school-level players to elite cricketers, and factoring in the difference in age, training and athleticism, you would expect to see stronger hamstrings in the professional players, however our research discovered that was not the case.

“The eccentric hamstring strength across all playing levels was almost identical, which is a major concern when you consider the intensity of today’s modern game at the elite level.

“This is a significant finding for professional cricket as it may explain why we are seeing a continual increase in HSIs in elite players, but not amongst the school-level players who are more likely to be injured by contact with the cricket ball.

“We also found no significant difference in eccentric hamstring strength between bowlers and batters; however, bowlers are more at risk of this particular injury during the bowling phase as they experience greater forces through their body so we expect these findings to be of particular relevance to this group of players.”

Mr Chalker said it was important to implement hamstring strengthening routines into training regimes in order to increase eccentric hamstring strength and to help reduce HSIs.

“Our recommendation is that teams need to be implementing eccentric-based strengthening exercises to strengthen hamstrings and reduce limb asymmetry,” the Bond health sciences researcher said.

“While elite players incorporate various strength and conditioning routines into their training schedules, strengthening exercises need to be specifically targeted to the hamstring, with an exercise like the Nordic hamstring exercise—which is basically a leg curl you would do at the gym, but lowering the whole body to the ground.

“We also believe it is important to implement these strength-based training routines not only in professional cricket but also at the junior level, so young athletes are conditioned and ready to move up through the ranks if and when the time comes.

“The next phase of our research will look at the effect of using real time visual feedback to help athletes reduce limb asymmetries, which also plays a role in hamstring injuries, using computers to monitor cricketers’ force output on both the left and right leg to identify and rectify asymmetries before they lead to injuries.”

Master of Sports Science at Bond University

The Master of Sports Science is designed to produce high quality graduates who possess an excellent understanding of advanced sports science practice. The program provides you with advanced studies in biomechanics, physiology, sport psychology and the principles of high performance sciences that incorporate programming, athlete monitoring and emerging technology in sports.

The program is delivered through a select blend of on-campus coursework, applied research and industry internship units. A unique feature of this program is the opportunity to gain comprehensive professional experience through the completion of a 10-month internship with a sports organisation relevant to the research project to be undertaken.

Program: Master of Sports Science
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: May
Duration: 4 semesters

Apply to a Bond University Health Sciences program!

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Learn more about studying sports science at Bond University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at 1-866-698-7355 or shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

Bond University launches “The Bullshark Cage”

Bond University has taken the wraps off ‘The Bullshark Cage’ – its new High Performance Training Centre at the Bond Institute of Health and Sport (BIHS).

The new elite sporting facility encompasses a gym, recovery area, rehabilitation pools and altitude room, and is the first stage of a two part upgrade to the BIHS, with an accompanying high-performance testing laboratory expected to be completed by September 2015.

Bond University Health Sciences

Study at the Bond Institute of Health and Sport

The launch was presided over by Bond University‘s Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Tim Brailsford, and featured guest speeches from Don Knapp, Chief Executive Officer of Australian University Sport and Bond’s Executive Director of Sport, Garry Nucifora.

Professor Brailsford said the state-of-the-art facilities formed an integral part of Bond University’s ongoing commitment to providing a world-class sporting program.

“The High Performance Training Centre will be dedicated to the development of elite sport both at the university and within the wider sports community,” he said.

“The centre has already attracted the attention of some of the world’s top sporting teams, and we look forward to welcoming students, staff and guests to the new facilities.”

Mr Knapp said Bond University‘s vision for the delivery of programs and facilities to support elite student athletes had been realised with the launch of the High Performance Training Centre.

“Bond is setting the benchmark in Australia in recognising the importance of dual career education, and the right of high achievers to pursue excellence in both sport and the classroom,” said Mr Knapp.

“The High Performance Training Centre will attract high achieving student athletes, coaches and academics, and will ultimately create a legacy of excellence.

“The Centre will undoubtedly produce many of tomorrow’s leaders in sport in Australia, thus making a great contribution to the nation’s sporting landscape.”

The launch was held at the Bond Institute of Health and Sport on Friday, July 10.

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Are you interested in studying exercise science and sports science at Bond University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia! Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Bond named partner for the 2015 Australian University Games

Bond University has been named the partner university of the 2015 Australian University Games, Australia’s largest multisport event for university student athletes.

The partnership was announced at the 2015 Australian University Sport (AUS) national conference in front of representatives from 39 of Australia’s tertiary education institutions.

Bond University Health Science degrees

Bond University sports facilities

The 2015 Australian University Games will be held from Sunday, Sept. 27 to Friday, Oct. 2, 2015, attracting more than 7,500 student athletes, team managers, staff and volunteers from across Australia to take part in 32 sports over five days of competition.

The event is known as a high standard multisport tourism event and managed by Australian University Sport, with support from the Queensland Government through its tourism and events agency, Tourism and Events Queensland.

With more than 100,000 student athletes having competed since its inception in 1993, the estimated economic impact of this year’s event is $12 million in direct expenditure and 44,000 visitor nights, with 6,000 student athletes attending from more than 35 interstate universities.

Garry Nucifora, Executive Director of Sport at Bond University, looks forward to hosting the 7,500 student athletes expected to compete.

“With the Games in our ‘backyard’ of the Gold Coast, Bond is very hopeful that an even greater number of student athletes will participate in the Games and make the most of the opportunities that enhance university life.”

Australian University Sport CEO Don Knapp welcomed Bond University as the Australian University Game’s partner university.

“We are thrilled to announce Bond University as our partner university for this year’s Games,” said Mr Knapp.

“As Australia’s peak body for university sport, our membership is comprised of tertiary institutions. Partnerships with members are not just critical to event delivery, but vital in helping us to develop university sport as a relevant and important aspect of university life at both the university leadership and student athlete levels.”

City of Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate is confident the Gold Coast will have its best on offer for the student athletes.

“I look forward to welcoming student athletes and officials from across the country to our spectacular city, sharing our world class sporting facilities and all that our city has to offer with them,” Cr Tate said.

The Games relies on the participation of the local community to make up the strong volunteer contingent that assists organisers to run the Games. Students or local community members looking to volunteer are encouraged to visit http://www.unisport.com.au/AUG for details.

Bond University Master of Sports Science

The Master of Sports Science is designed to produce high quality graduates who possess an excellent understanding of advanced sports science practice. The program provides you with advanced studies in biomechanics, physiology, sport psychology and the principles of high performance sciences that incorporate programming, athlete monitoring and emerging technology in sports.

The program is delivered through a select blend of on-campus coursework, applied research and industry internship units. A unique feature of this program is the opportunity to gain comprehensive professional experience through the completion of a 10-month internship with a sports organisation relevant to the research project to be undertaken.

The Master of Sports Science will culminate with the submission of a peer-reviewed manuscript that may be eligible for publication, providing an additional pathway for you to progress to further postgraduate research.

Benefit from the real-world experience of Bond University‘s specialist sports scientists, whose academic qualifications are complemented by their ongoing research with major sporting bodies and doping agencies such as Dr Bon Gray who is currently conducting an Anti-Doping Research Project.

Apply to a Bond University Health Sciences program!

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Are you interested in studying exercise science and sports science at Bond University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia! Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

Aussie sporting heroes take on Ironman Challenge at Bond University

Bond University has put some of Australia’s elite athletes to the test in the Nutri-Grain Sports Star Challenge—a two-part television series that pits Ironmen superstars, such as Ky Hurst and Matt Poole, against professional Aussie sporting heroes from a wide variety of sporting codes.

Bond University Physiotherapy School

Bond University Institute of Health & Sport

Cricketer Simon Katich, Adelaide Crows captain Patrick Dangerfield, Olympic hurdler Michelle Jenneke, State of Origin and Newcastle Knights player Kurt Gidley, Sydney Swans player Lewis Jetta, and recently retired NRL player Beau Ryan, participated in a range of tests over land and sea to find out how their capabilities stacked up against the gruelling demands of the Ironman competition.

The unique sports experiment was filmed at Bond University Institute of Health and Sport’s Human Performance Laboratory on the Gold Coast, and experts at the university used the very best in scientific testing to devise a series of challenging and appropriate physiological tests that were both scientifically specific and entertaining for viewers.

Associate Professor of Exercise and Sports Science, Mike Climstein, said the calibre of facilities at the Bond Institute of Health and Sport made them the ideal location for filming the Nutri-Grain Sports Challenge.

“Without the ability to accurately quantify each of the athletes’ levels of fitness, strength, endurance and adaptability, the Nutri-Grain Sports Challenge wouldn’t have been able to accurately compare their various strengths and weaknesses,” Associate Professor Climstein said.

Bond University‘s Institute of Health and Sport was able to provide state-of-the-art facilities and a respected team of experts in the field of athlete assessment, making Bond the perfect venue for the athletes to undergo the rigorous testing.

“Filming took place in Bond’s Exercise & Sports Science laboratory, as well as on our nearby beaches for endurance tests such as the Beep Test conducted on the sand—a test of peak maximal aerobic performance—and the Wade Test, which includes a short run and swim through the shore break that imitates the start of an Ironman race.”

The first episode of the series paired each athlete with an Ironman or Ironwoman—Ky Hurst, Matt Poole, Kendrick Louis, Ali Day, Tanyn Lyndon or Courtney Hancock—setting the participants in head-to-head competitions in both the Bond University “lab” and on the beach.

The series finale featured the athletes competing against each other in a 50m swim leg and 100m board paddle, before being joined by their mentors to complete the final 200m ski leg on a double ski.

Bond Physiotherapy School Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)

The Doctor of Physiotherapy program offers an innovative problem based learning model of physiotherapy education to prepare entry level physiotherapists for their roles and responsibilities as first contact practitioners. The program integrates the clinical, pathological and related sciences with the physiotherapy knowledge, skills and professional behaviours and attitudes required to examine, diagnose and treat physiotherapy clients.

The Bond DPT places a strong emphasis on clinical experiential learning with 50 per cent of the program undertaken in a clinical context, enabling students to progressively develop and apply knowledge, skills and professional attitudes and behaviour for physiotherapy practice.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intake: May
Duration: 2 years

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Questions about studying physiotherapy or Exercise & Sports Science at Bond University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, October 20th, 2014

Bond Health Sciences study exercise-induced injuries

Recreational runners are wanted for the largest online study of its kind in Australia to determine the role of genetics in exercise-induced bone and tendon injuries.

The study is being conducted by AIS researchers in conjunction with Bond University’s Collaborative Research Network for Advancing Exercise and Sports Science.

Bond University Physiotherapy School

Study sports science and physiotherapy at Bond University

AIS Chief Medical Officer Dr David Hughes said the study—The genetics of exercise-induced injuries in tendon and bone—needs runners aged 18 and older who run between 15 and 60 km in two to five sessions a week to participate in the online survey.

Athletes who register have the chance to win a $50 voucher to spend at 2XU.COM.AU.

“The aim of the study is to provide world first information into the genetic predictors of exercise-related bone and tendon injuries,” Dr Hughes said.

“Bone and tendon stress injuries of the lower leg result in significant time lost to training in both elite and recreational athletes.

“The use of personalised medicine in many fields of medicine has been increasing in recent years and this should be possible for the field of sports medicine.

“This study will allow coaches to work with athletes in designing training programs that are specifically tailored to the unique genetic strengths and weaknesses of the individual athlete.

“This study,  in line with Australia’s Winning Edge 2012–2022 principles, will provide the right support to the right athletes on their high performance pathway and ultimately help all athletes in injury prevention practices.”

Bond Doctor of Physiotherapy Teaching Methodology

Are you considering studying physiotherapy at Bond? Please note that Bond Physiotherapy School has updated their application deadline to October 31, 2014.

The Doctor of Physiotherapy program uses a problem-based learning (PBL) model for education. Resource teaching sessions (lectures and practical problem solving classes), along with seminars and assignments support and extend the PBL mode of learning. Examination formats include objective structure clinical examinations (OSCEs), theory papers, assignments and oral presentations.

Work Experience & Internships

The first 30 weeks of clinical experiences will be gained in both hospital and community settings. Students complete a clinical internship (12 weeks) with an embedded research project in their final semester. This final placement is designed to ensure graduates are ideally prepared for entering the workforce.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Next intake: May 2015
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 31, 2014

Apply now to Bond Physiotherapy School!

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Do you have questions about studying at Bond University or about Bond Physiotherapy School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

Bond makes history with ‘Australian first’ postgraduate nutrition programs

The 25th anniversary of Bond University marked a historic event for the Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, with the very first cohort of postgraduate nutrition students commencing their studies in nutrition and dietetic practice, and public health nutrition.

Bond University Health Sciences

Study nutrition and dietetic practice at Bond University

Head of Program Professor Liz Isenring said both masters programs are Australian firsts, with the Master of Nutrition and Dietetic Practice being Australia’s most comprehensive postgraduate program in nutrition and dietetics (AQF extended level 9).

“We are also proud that our Master of Public Health Nutrition is the first of its kind in Australia that has been specifically designed to prepare graduates who will meet certification requirements of the World Public Health Nutrition Association,” Professor Isenring said.

The curriculum design has been informed by more than a decade of nutrition and dietetics workforce development research by Bond’s Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Roger Hughes.

“We have established an outstanding academic team led by Professor Liz Isenring, including one of Australia’s most accomplished entrepreneurial dietitians in the form of Assistant Professor Tara Diversi,” Professor Hughes said.

“Both of these new programs are distinguished by a strong research component as well as a compulsory international experience placement where students will develop graduate skills in international nutrition and dietetic practice, including the development of cultural competency.”

Students had an engaging first week at the university, culminating with informal drinks and networking with the visiting committee members for the Industry Advisory Board for Nutrition and Dietetics.

Professor Isenring said Bond’s small class sizes offered big benefits to the new students.

“Due to our small class sizes, our students benefit from exceptional access to specialist consultant practitioners and industry leaders in a range of fields including clinical dietetics, sports nutrition, food industry, private practice and public health nutrition,” she said.

“We will have regular VIP guests in our lectures and workshops, such as an intimate Paddock to Plate class with Maggie Beer later this year.”

The new programs are evidence of the continued growth of the health, medicine, sports and research disciplines led by the Faculty of Health Sciences & Medicine.

Professor Hughes said the new programs were a sign of greater things to come.

“This successful commencement of our two new masters programs is just the start of the ramping up of Bond University’s development in postgraduate health professional programs,” he said.

“We are excited with the current success, and planning several new programs for 2015.”

Bond University Nutrition and Dietetics

The Bond University Master of Nutrition and Dietetic Practice program is the first of its kind in Australia. The program’s design is based on extensive workforce development research to produce professionals who are ready to forge a career in nutrition and dietetics.

Program: Master of Nutrition and Dietetic Practice
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Next semester intake: May 2015
Duration: 2 years

Entry requirements

Undergraduate degree in health science or other related degree with at least two subjects each from studies in human physiology and biochemistry.

Bond University Public Health Nutrition

The Master of Public Health Nutrition program is the first of its kind in Australia. The program design is based on extensive national and international workforce development research to produce professionals who are work-ready in Australian and overseas, to forge a career in public health nutrition. Graduates will be equipped with a specialised set of knowledge, skills and experience in research and practice public health nutrition.

Program: Master of Public Health Nutrition
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Next semester intake: May 2015
Duration: 2 years

Entry requirements

Undergraduate degree in health science or other related degree with at least two subjects each from studies in human physiology and biochemistry.

Apply to Bond University Health Sciences!

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Are you interested in Nutrition and Dietetics, Public Health Nutrition, and other health sciences at Bond University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

Bond University study puts spotlight on nutrition in aged care

With research revealing one in two aged care residents are undernourished, Bond University on the Gold Coast has announced its involvement in a study, known as The Lantern Project, which aims to improve the nutrition and health of older Australians.

The Lantern Project is a three-year research program that will be undertaken by dietician and columnist Cherie Hugo, who has just begun her PhD in Nutrition and Dietetics at Bond University’s Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine.

Bond University Health Sciences

Study Nutrition and Dietetics at Bond University

Ms Hugo’s aim is to shine a light on the issue of food in the aged care sector and how it can be improved.

Three Gold Coast aged care facilities, along with a number of others across Queensland and New South Wales will be involved, with more being invited to participate.

The study has already had its first celebrity endorsement, with renowned cook and author Maggie Beer backing the research as part of the new Maggie Beer Foundation, which was launched in South Australia this week.

Bond University Nutrition and Dietetics program head, Professor Liz Isenring, is a project member on The Lantern Project and was also announced as one of eight professionals from around the country on the board of the Maggie Beer Foundation this week.

Along with supporting The Lantern Project, The Maggie Beer Foundation is piloting its program in South Australia with education and aged care facilities, to enhance the delivery of food and well-being approaches in aged care.

Professor Isenring said both projects were major steps forward in improving the health and quality of life of the elderly, which was a complex issue.

“There has been extensive research conducted across the public and private sector in Australia that shows one in two aged care residents are undernourished due to a range of factors, such as lack of appetite, not enjoying the food they are provided with and complications from multiple medical conditions,” she said.

“This poor nutrition leads to associated issues such as pressure ulcers, falls and an increased risk of hospitalisation, but it is not an inevitable part of aging; by improving nutrition we can improve quality of life in many ways.

“The focus of both projects is not on showing which aged care facilities aren’t doing well, but rather highlighting those who are doing fantastic things and encouraging others to make similar improvements.”

Professor Isenring said the average aged care facility had just $6 a day to spend per person for all meals and snacks, and The Lantern Project would delve into the cost and benefit of increasing this amount.

“We will be undertaking some sophisticated health economics to highlight the fact food should not be seen as a cost that can easily be cut back on, but as important to health as hygiene or medication,” she said.

“We are hoping to come up with a dollar value on the savings that can be made in these areas by lifting the dollar value of what is spent on providing good quality food.

“We believe even adding an extra dollar or two a day could make a dramatic difference and are hoping the findings will help influence policy decision makers in this regard.

“At the same time, we want to get the message across that it doesn’t take a lot of money to produce good quality food if you use fresh produce and the right ingredients.

“We will be working with aged care centres to show them how they can better achieve this.”

Professor Isenring said the study would also look beyond food to associated aspects of the dining experience.

“We will be considering things like ambiance, music and introducing proper napkins.  Basically, how to make dining a really enjoyable time,” she said.

“In aged care facilities, a lot of things are taken away but food is something people have control and choice over.  They can talk about it and look forward to it, so it can really make a difference in quality of life.

“The current generation in aged care have a tendency not to complain, but the baby boomer generation are unlikely to be as accepting.  They are used to a lot more choice and will be more demanding, so there has never been a more important time to take a good hard look at this issue.”

About Bond University Nutrition and Dietetics

The Bond University Master of Nutrition and Dietetic Practice program is the first of its kind in Australia. The program’s design is based on extensive workforce development research to produce professionals who are ready to forge a career in nutrition and dietetics. Graduates will be equipped with a unique set of knowledge, skills and experience in research and practice to apply across a range of areas including clinical dietetics, private practice, food service management, public health nutrition, sports nutrition and nutrition research.

The competencies embedded within this program exceed those set for accreditation requirements by the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA). The program is distinctive to other dietetics programs because of its emphasis on developing evidence-based practitioners that have had intensive preparation in dietetic practice, nutrition research and international engagement. As part of the program, you will participate in an international placement and will engage in projects that focus on the entrepreneurial practice of nutrition and dietetics.

Program: Master of Nutrition and Dietetic Practice
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Next semester intake: May 2015
Duration: 2 years

Entry requirements

Undergraduate degree in health science or other related degree with at least two subjects each from studies in human physiology and biochemistry.

Apply to Bond University Health Sciences!

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Interested in Nutrition and Dietetics and other health sciences at Bond University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia! Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

Bond researcher takes third place in global genetic research competition

Bond University researcher and Teaching Fellow, Mark Barash, has taken third place in a global genetic research competition for his research which has the potential to help solve crimes and ancient mysteries.

Bond University

Study at Bond University

Run by US-based bioinformatics company, Golden Helix, the inaugural awards attracted more than 50 entries from DNA researchers in more than 20 countries. Their submissions highlighted the extensive array of futuristic research being conducted in this field worldwide, with subjects ranging from humans to animals to fruits and vegetables.

Mr Barash was awarded third place for his investigations into the genetic factors that influence human appearance and facial features. His research has broad applications and could potentially help to solve crimes and ancient anthropological mysteries.

According to Mr Barash, his data is attracting a lot of attention as it open to a wide range of applications in medical, forensic and anthropological sectors.

“Based on my previous experience with the police force, the data can give forensic investigators an extraordinary advantage, enabling them to draw a ‘molecular portrait’ from a minute DNA sample left behind at a crime scene. In the absence of any eye witnesses or video evidence, for instance, they could estimate what the perpetrator looks like based on the DNA left at the crime scene,” Mr Barash said.

Mr Barash’s PhD supervisor, Associate Professor Lotti Tajouri, has a passion for ancient Egypt and sees the potential for this work to be used by anthropologists to show the world what ancient mummies would have looked like.

A former Forensic DNA Officer with the Israeli Police Force in Jerusalem, Mr Barash moved to Australia in 2010 to undertake his groundbreaking research at Bond University’s Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine.

His PhD thesis focuses on identifying the “single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in the determination of facial morphology.”

“SNPs are single point variations in our DNA sequence, which are responsible in part for the facial differences and therefore in the way we look,” said Mr Barash. “These specific subtle DNA variations can even explain why some people are susceptible to diseases and others aren’t; why people respond differently to drugs and chemicals.

“For my research, the goal is to identify SNPs that play a part in enabling normal variation of our facial characteristics, such as the shape and size of our nose, eyes, ears and other visible traits. While the craniofacial development is a very complex and poorly understood process, the results of this project have provided evidence of DNA markers associated with several traits of our face.

Mr Barash and his fellow winners from the Golden Helix competition will present their research to a global audience via a complimentary webcast that will be scheduled in the coming months.

Bond University’s Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine is dedicated to shaping individuals with superior scientific acumen who are distinguished by their ethics, professionalism and humanity. The postgraduate programs offered by the faculty have been designed to enable students to expand on an existing knowledge base and foster advanced capability to succeed in a chosen career within either the private or public sector. The programs are also designed to enrich students from other disciplines with a knowledge base that facilitates diversification and expansion of their academic horizons.

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Interested in health sciences and research at Bond University and at other Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia! Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, July 25th, 2013

Bond University Health Sciences research may lead to improved global anti-doping program

A Bond University Health Sciences scientist has presented to a major international symposium research findings with the potential to significantly improve sports anti-doping test programs.

Associate Professor Dr Bon Gray of the Department of Exercise and Sport science in Bond University’s Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, has led research into changes in white blood cells to detect the use of human growth hormone.

The results show changes in gene expression that persist for at least 21 days after finishing a seven-day course of growth hormone which is a vast improvement on the current test that has a window of detection of only 36 hours.

Dr Gray has presented the findings to World Anti-Doping Agency’s Gene and Cell Doping Symposium in Beijing. This stemmed from a one-year pilot project funded by the Australian government’s Anti Doping Research Program to develop a new blood test for the detection of the use of human growth hormone.

“The idea centres on measurement of changes in gene expression in white blood cells which are part of our immune system,” he said, adding that profiling in the detection of growth hormone usage could have direct application for the development a novel anti-doping detection method.

Hosted by the China Anti-Doping Agency and the Beijing Olympic City Development Association, the Beijing symposium examined scientific advances in gene doping research, and in particular focused on latest developments in the use genetic technologies for doping detection.

The Bond University Health Sciences professor has had extensive experience in education, sport, coaching and exercise science and completed a PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology at the Australian National University in Canberra while undertaking research at the Australian Institute of Sport.

Dr Gray and his co-investigator Associate Professor Lotti Tajouri were among a select group of experts from around the world in the fields of scientific research, anti-doping testing and medicine invited to the symposium. Dr Gray commented that since only 20 sports scientists from around the world were invited to the symposium, it made it a very significant gathering of the best research in this specialized field.

“It is a recognition of the work that Bond University has been doing in a number of areas in the field of sports science and adds to the university’s prestige in the overall fields of Health and Medical Science.”

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Are you interested in studying exercise science and sports science at Bond University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia! Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).