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Articles categorized as ‘Griffith University Environmental Sciences’

Thursday, April 6th, 2017

Scholarships for international Master of Integrated Water Management candidates

Australia, the land of droughts and flooding rains is an ideal location to study water resource management issues.

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. It is a country whose water resources are highly susceptible to changes in temperature and the hydrological regime.

Scholarships for international Master of Integrated Water Management candidates

Students enrolled at UQ participate in a one-day field trip to Brisbane River.

The Australian water industry is globally respected for its knowledge and technical capability in a diverse range of water management practices, and Australian research efforts are increasingly recognising the importance of integrating different disciplines for more effective water policy.

Scholarships for Master of Integrated Water Management candidates

The International WaterCentre (IWC) provides education and training, applied research and knowledge services to implement a whole-of-water cycle approach and develop capacity in integrated water resource management.

The International WaterCentre (IWC) is offering a full scholarship (valued at AU$52,500 for 18 months of study) for high calibre candidates accepted into the Master of Integrated Water Management (MIWM) commencing in Semester 1, 2018.

  • May 1, 2017: Applications open
  • July 31, 2017: Applications close
  • August 23, 2017: Shortlisted applicants will be notified (via email)
  • November 1, 2017: Scholarships Selection Panel will make a final decision on successful recipients (by this date)
  • February 2018: the IWC Master of Integrated Water Management will commence at the University of Queensland

Eligibility requirements

To apply for a scholarship, you must

  • have completed an undergraduate degree in a related field of study from an internationally recognised institution; and
  • have at least two years of professional experience (paid work or volunteering experience) relevant to the program.

Although professional experience is not essential for admission in the MIWM program, candidates with relevant professional experience have a higher chance of securing a scholarship.

Selection criteria

The Scholarship Selection Panel will use the following selection criteria to assess and rank applications:

  1. Leadership qualities: including collaboration and team work, flexibility, initiative, communication skills, integrity and vision through professional, educational, community and other achievements.
  2. Professional and volunteering record: relevant employment and volunteering experience, achievements, membership of professional bodies and professional references.
  3. Academic record: an excellent academic record and a likelihood of success in further study.
  4. Commitment to promoting and driving the implementation of collaborative, whole-of-water-cycle, integrated and interdisciplinary approaches to water management.
  5. Potential outcomes: the likelihood of positive impacts on the individual and the water sector from participating in the MIWM program.

About the Master of Integrated Water Management

The Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland is one of the few courses in the world that takes a truly transdisciplinary, integrated approach to water management in both developed and developing country contexts. The degree is co-badged and co-delivered by leading industry practitioners and lecturers from International WaterCentre’s  founding member universities: University of Queensland, Monash University, Griffith University, and the University of Western Australia.

The Master of Integrated Water Management (MIWM) creates water leaders by drawing on international teaching and research from many fields to provide a transdisciplinary, whole-of-water-cycle approach. Students get the skills to consider the impacts of decisions systemically across environment, politics, law, science, culture, engineering, economics, health and society.

Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Do you have questions about the Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland? Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016

Griffith environmental sciences student gets real world experience

A fairy tale and university study may seem an unusual pairing but for Griffith University student Tahlia Rossi a Heron Island field trip was just that.

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Tahlia Rossi at Heron Island (Photo: Griffith University)

There were no glass slippers to be found, but flippers were the footwear of choice for students diving on the Great Barrier Reef.

Tahlia is studying a double degree, Urban & Environmental Planning and Science with a double major in Marine Biology and Climate Change Adaptation, so real world experience that puts the skills she’s learning into action was the perfect environment for her.

The marine field course sees students embark on a week-long science experience at Heron Island on the reef where they undertake research projects as part of their degree.

Having been “deeply inspired by nature and learning of its intricate functions and beauty,” Tahlia has always been excited by the  concept of contributing knowledge through research.

She’s hoping to bring a science background to a career in urban planning to give her more credibility and the knowledge and ability to collaborate with people in other disciplines.

Her degrees have given her amazing opportunities as well as allowing her to work as a Research Assistant at Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation. Tahlia will also represent Griffith at the 2016 Advance Global Australian Summit at the Sydney Opera House as a mentee.

“It has been inspiring to be given so many opportunities like going on exchange to the University of Copenhagen for one year, attending a sustainability summit in Singapore, going on this research trip to Heron Island, receiving training in mentoring, resume writing, communication skills and presentation skills,” she says.

“I have been challenged by the length of my degree and the difficulty of some of the science subjects, but on the other hand, to overcome these challenges gives me confidence and strength.”

Advance is the preeminent global community of high achieving Australians and alumni abroad, with more than 40,000 connections in 90 countries. Advance forges connections with the one million Australian diaspora, drawing on their experience and networks to open doors and opportunities for Australia, Australian companies and Australians around the globe.
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Would you like to study environmental science at Griffith University? Contact OzTREKK Admission Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information.

Friday, July 29th, 2016

Can you teach a koala new tricks?

Griffith University researchers have found that koalas are more clever than they thought them to be in a world-first study that tracked the Australian animal more comprehensively than ever before in suburban Brisbane.

The Griffith Environmental Futures Research Institute team, made up of Cathryn Dexter, Justin Scott and Professor Darryl Jones, verified 130 crossings by koalas involving a retrofitted structure or eco-passage over a 30-month period.

Sydney Dental School

Can a koala learn new tricks? Studies say absolutely! (Photo credit: Griffith University)

The findings were released in a paper titled Using complementary remote detection methods for retrofitted eco-passages: a case study for monitoring individual koalas in south-east Queensland published by the CSIRO July 26.

Professor Darryl Jones of the Griffith School of Environment said nobody knew whether the structures would actually keep koalas safe from being hit by cars or if they would work.

“We expected the animals to take a while to get used to them,” he said.

“To our great surprise they were using them three weeks into it. Can you teach koalas new tricks? You can; that’s the point. I was the first skeptical person to say they’re not that smart.”

The team used a range of technologies that allowed them to not just generically monitor whether koalas passed through the crossing but pinpointed individual koalas and the exact time they entered and left the tunnel.

Using camera traps, audio radio transmitters, RFID tags (similar to microchips in pets) and WIDs (wireless ID tags)—which act like RFID tags but can be detected from a much greater distance—they gathered more information than any previous research.

The WIDs were developed by two Griffith graduates Rob Appleby and Jason Edgar who now run their own wildlife monitoring company, Wild Spy, and were a part of the research.

“This is all about trying to make absolutely sure that koalas are using some of the structures we’ve put out for them to get safely under roads,” Professor Jones said.

“Knowing how they do that is really difficult. You can get photos but you don’t know if it’s the same animal each time.

“The essence of this you can get really import information using a range of technologies at the same time. That’s a world first. Nobody has done that so comprehensively before.

“We really wanted to know what individual koalas were doing, whether they crossed at the same time each day. We wanted more information than most people ever need and we did that using this range of technologies.”

Professor Jones said most people living in suburban Brisbane or parts of the Gold Coast did not realise koalas lived all around them and that these structures were keeping them safe in their backyards and off the roads.

The research was supported by funding from the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads, which was responsible for the structures.

“The tunnels were an experiment,” Professor Jones said. “Nobody knew whether they would work or not. We really wanted to know what the local koala was doing so we got ridiculous amount of details of these animals.

“We needed to be clear on whether they were successful because the structures were so innovative and risky that we tried really hard to prove it. That’s why it was worth it.

“Although we don’t want the koalas to be disturbed, all over the place on the Gold Coast and in Brisbane there are special koala specific tunnels and ledges that are allowing them to cross. Those animals are not going to be hit anymore so that’s good news.

The crossings studied in Brisbane were within the jurisdictions of Brisbane City, Redland City and Moreton Bay Regional Council.

Traffic volumes for this region are predicted to increase by 19 per cent, or 2.8 million trips per day between 2006 and 2031.

The paper states: “The continuous clearing of koala habitat for development has placed a great deal of pressure on local koala populations and the risk of vehicle strike is recognised as a key threatening process for ongoing koala persistence in this region.

“The focus must shift from studies that simply assess how many species pass through an eco-passage (i.e., presence), to those that assess the utilisation level by individuals.

“Such information will represent a powerful step forward in providing road authorities with recommendations in relation to the design and placement of crossing structures, and ensuring that the costs equal the ecological benefit.”

Griffith School of Environment

The Griffith School of Environment was thought of as revolutionary; today it is more important than ever. Over that time the environment and sustainable practice has evolved from a fringe issue to a mainstream challenge to government, industry and even individual households. Griffith is helping society to face those challenges.

The university has expanded on their initial programs to offer not only environmental and natural sciences but also urban planning and architecture with a focus on sustainable development. Griffith University’s undergraduate and postgraduate degree programs include

  • architecture;
  • ecology;
  • environmental sciences;
  • environmental management;
  • marine science; and
  • urban and environmental planning.

The school has the largest group of environmental professionals in any university in Australia, and among the largest in the world.

Apply to Griffith University School of Environment!

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Would you like more information about studying environmental sciences at Griffith University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Griffith MBA backs endangered orangutans through carbon offset

Indonesian orangutans, whose future existence was endangered by forest fires in 2015, are among the beneficiaries of a Griffith MBA decision to offset the effect of its greenhouse gas emissions.

The Griffith MBA was the first Australian MBA program to offset its carbon footprint, and has now completed two comprehensive assessments of its emissions over a 12-month period.

Griffith MBA backs endangered orangutans through carbon offset

By offsetting its carbon footprint, the Griffith MBA is supporting an endangered orangutan in Indonesia (Photo credit: Griffith University)

The latest report, produced by energy and carbon management consultancy Pangolin Associates, shows a total of 366 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2-e) attributed to the operations of the MBA program for the 2013-14 year, a 67-tonne reduction on the previous assessment.

The 366 total has been offset through the purchase of certified carbon credits from two innovative, Asian-based projects, following consultation with Griffith MBA students and alumni.

Gansu Zhangye Heihe Longhui Small Scale Hydropower Project in regional China and the Rimba Raya Biodiversity Reserve on Borneo Island are the beneficiaries of the Griffith Business School initiative.

Core values

“We pride ourselves on the program’s core values, which includes a commitment to sustainable business practice,” Associate Professor Chris Fleming, Griffith MBA Director, said. “This offset is also consistent with the MBA’s Asia-Pacific focus.

“Sustainable business practice is not just about environmental sustainability. It is also about being socially sustainable and both of these projects speak to this principle.

“The continued viability of the Indonesian project, for example, is important as it means an economic boost for the local community whether it is money earned on the reserve that improves livelihoods, employment created or new levels of food security that improve health,” Associate Professor Fleming said.

“In addition, the training and educational benefits for the community are significant, not least through the confidence it generates.”

The Rimba Raya Biodiversity Reserve project preserves carbon-dense tropical peat swamp by helping to prevent deforestation at a 47,000-hectare site earmarked for development into a palm oil plantation.

The site is also home to Indonesia’s largest private orangutan sanctuary. Raging fires in dense Borneo forest last October threatened one third of the world’s remaining wild orangutans, according to conservationists.

Leadership

In the case of the China-based hydropower project, the water resources of the Heihe River are used to generate and supply the electricity, which would otherwise be produced by coal-fired plants. “Projects such as this one need to be supported to help level the playing field in the ongoing duel with coal production.”

Associate Professor Fleming says the offset initiative should engage current or aspiring MBA student aiming to progress their careers into business management leadership roles.

“Any MBA student looking for innovation, responsibility and progress will see the Griffith MBA is an MBA for the 21st century, not an MBA stuck in the eighties.

“There is an onus on the global business sector now to take and demonstrate responsibility. You won’t get away with activities that are less than responsible today.”

Griffith MBA

Like all MBAs, the Griffith MBA explores all the business disciplines you would expect—accounting and reporting, economics, finance, people management, marketing, strategy and innovation. However, what makes the Griffith MBA different is that it’s built on core values that are crucial to modern business: sustainable business practices; responsible leadership; and global orientation—particularly, the potential impacts of the Asian century.

Program: Master of Business Administration
Location: South Bank Campus, Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years

Apply to Griffith Business School!

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Are you interested in studying at Griffith Business School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Business Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztkrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Griffith in partnership on sustainable tourism

Griffith University Institute for Tourism (GIFT) has entered into a strategic partnership with EarthCheck, the world’s leading certification and business advisory group for sustainable tourism.

Griffith Business School

Professor Susanne Becken (Photo: Griffith University)

GIFT Director Professor Susanne Becken said the agreement will allow both parties to collaborate on research and development projects in the field of sustainable tourism and environmental management.

“EarthCheck holds the world’s most comprehensive database with environmental metrics collected from their international client network over more than 15 years of operation,” Professor Becken said.

“This will give our students practical experience in the most advanced measurement tools, and practical operational insights.”

Through its global strategic partnerships, GIFT’s structure and research programs are designed to ensure high industry and policy relevance. Following the triple bottom line concept, the key areas of impact of research undertaken at GIFT reflect economic, social and environmental dimensions.

During 2016, GIFT and EarthCheck will focus on three core research and consulting projects:

  1. Research into the relationship between water and energy use at major hotel groups
  2. Developing the tourism workforce of the future through labour and skills development, certification and mobility in the APEC region
  3. Development of a global sustainable travel and tourism indicator set

Professor Becken will present the latest findings on global greenhouse gas emissions and corporate social responsibility at the upcoming Inner Circle 2016 forum in April 2016, an annual think-tank hosted by EarthCheck for its members.

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Find out more about environmental management or business degrees available at Griffith University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Griffith launches Green Labs program

Griffith Sciences and Griffith Health laboratories are going green.

Griffith University Green Labs program

Griffith Sciences Technical Manager Stephen Boyd, Eskitis Institute Director Professor Jennifer Martin and Sustainability Project Officer Kay Ollett at the launch of the Green Labs program at Nathan campus (Photo credit: Griffith University)

The Green Labs program aims to provide more sustainable practices in laboratory procedures and management.

“In laboratories sustainability offers real challenges and opportunities in minimizing energy, water consumption and chemical/biological waster,’’ says Stephen Boyd, Griffith Sciences Technical Manager.

“Compared to other work areas such as office space, laboratories are high-energy consumers and/or producers of these factors.

“Making even small changes in energy consumption or waste production will provide a significant benefit in reducing the carbon footprint and environmental load from laboratory operations.”

Green Labs objectives:

  • Reduce energy and water consumption
  • Improve waste disposal and recycling practices
  • Raise environmental impact and protection awareness in laboratories
  • Improve purchasing decisions in laboratories
Griffith University Green Labs program

Second-year Bachelor of Science student Clinton Carty-Lewis uses a lower fume cupboard hood sash height to conserve energy (Photo credit: Griffith University)

“Simple practices include switching off electrical appliances when not in use, reduction of fume cupboard hood sash heights which reduces waste of conditioned air, and appropriate sharing of chemicals to minimise duplication and accumulation in stock.

“Universities worldwide are implementing sustainability initiatives including similar Green Lab programs. Griffith University will continue to develop the program to be as comprehensive as possible.”

Griffith School of Environment

Since its inception, Griffith has had an ongoing commitment to the environment and sustainability. As a forerunner in the field, in 1975 Griffith launched Australia’s first environmental science degree and since then, has continued to lead in areas of environmental science, education, research and practices.

In 2010 Griffith reinforced its sustainability commitment when it signed up to the UN Global Compact—the world’s largest voluntary corporate and sustainability initiative. The Compact has 10 universally accepted principles in the areas of human rights, labour, environment and anti-corruption.

‘To be a sustainable university’ is one of five key goals in Griffith University’s Strategic Plan 2013–2017.

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Would you like to study environmental science at Griffith University? Contact OzTREKK Admission Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information.

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Griffith School of Environment talks about urban greening strategies

Our cities are getting hotter, more crowded and noisier. Climate change is bringing more heatwaves, placing pressure on human health, urban amenity, productivity and infrastructure.

Urban residents naturally want to stay cool. Air conditioning is the usual choice, but it can be expensive to run. Air conditioning also adds carbon pollution, creates noise and can make outdoor spaces hotter.

Griffith University Environmental Sciences

Griffith School of Environment talks about urban greening strategies (Photo credit: Griffith University)

So what else can we do to manage increasing urban heat? And who has the ability to act?

Urban planners are increasingly involved in developing and delivering urban greening strategies. While it seems like a “no brainer” to green cities, our international research shows that planners are not always comfortable with this idea.

However, green infrastructure—including street trees, green roofs, vegetated surfaces and green walls—is emerging as a viable way to help cities adapt to increased heat. Uptake of these technologies is slowly increasing in many cities around the world.

The Australian government has recognised this trend. An agenda to green Australia’s cities is now in place. Stated aims include managing climate change impacts, reducing urban heat, improving urban well-being and increasing environmental performance.

This urban greening agenda is part of the Clean Air and Urban Landscapes hub, under the National Environmental Science Program.

Benefits of urban greening

The broadening appeal of green infrastructure is helped by the fact it offers multiple benefits.

For example, shading from strategically placed street trees can lower surrounding temperatures by up to 6℃, or up to 20℃ over roads. Green roofs and walls can naturally cool buildings, substantially lowering demand for air conditioning. Green infrastructure can also provide habitat for wildlife, recreational opportunities for people, better management of stormwater runoff and improved urban aesthetics.

Hard surfacing, including concrete, asphalt and stone, is common in cities. It can increase urban temperatures by absorbing heat and radiating it back into the air. Green infrastructure can minimise this difficulty as it better regulates ambient air temperatures. Foliage allows local cooling through evapotranspiration, where plants release water vapour into the surrounding atmosphere.

Why planners are cautious

Our research examined urban planners’ attitudes towards green infrastructure use in Australia, England and Ireland. We found that planners are broadly aware of green infrastructure as an urban intervention. They understand its use, application and capacity to provide multiple benefits, especially in terms of managing urban heat.

The planners we interviewed, while recognising the potential value of green infrastructure, strongly cautioned that delivering the technology can be an uncertain process. The biggest barrier cited was that planning departments are not experienced with green infrastructure.

Put simply, they tend to avoid it because it has not traditionally featured on urban planning agendas. Like any new planning endeavour, green infrastructure can create institutional, legal, economic, social and environmental challenges.

Some of the biophysical challenges associated with green infrastructure delivery are novel. Choosing appropriate forms of vegetation, for example, may be difficult. Decisions must be made based on prevailing climactic conditions, drainage capacity and species growth patterns.

Will root systems damage buildings or underground utility networks? Might trees topple during storms and damage houses? Are roofs strong enough to support a rooftop garden? Planners may not be able to answer these questions, which creates a need for external experts to advise them.

Our findings also highlight socio-political factors as barriers. These include governance concerns such as the political context in which planning decisions are made.

Management issues also feature. Chief among these are government commitments to budget for green infrastructure delivery and management.

Planners are also wary of public involvement. They know that public sentiment about green infrastructure can be influenced by perceptions of modified access, changed use, or loss.

What can be done?

The urgency for providing urban green infrastructure increases as climate change makes our cities hotter. Our research suggests the principal task for planners is to overcome embedded practices and to accept green infrastructure as an emerging but permanent urban feature.

This will not be easy. For example, a decision to use a road easement for green infrastructure may require multiple meetings with other government departments, utility companies and residents. Planners will need to coordinate these, manage stakeholder expectations and ensure cost sharing where necessary.

Legal, economic, social and environmental issues will require innovative solutions.

Planners will increasingly be tasked to deliver green infrastructure in cities. They will need to be clear on its value, be prepared to lead its delivery and learn from new challenges and solutions encountered along the way.

Urban residents all over the world stand to benefit if planners can successfully meet this challenge, particularly as hotter temperatures threaten urban comfort and habitability.

Story by Associate Professor Jason Byrne and Dr Tony Matthews, Griffith School of Environment

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Find out more about studying environmental sciences at Griffith University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

Global warming could occur more quickly than expected

Global warming could occur more quickly than expected, according to a new model which is the first to include “energy use per person” as a predictive factor.

The model forecasts that population and economic growth combined with rising energy use per person could significantly increase global energy demand and COemissions, causing the world average temperature to rise by 1.5 degrees by as early as 2020.

Griffith environmental sciences

The world is on track to reach dangerous levels of global warming much sooner than expected, according to new research. (Image: Griffith University)

The model was developed by Dr Liam Wagner from Griffith Business School’s Department Accounting, Finance and Economics and Professor Ben Hankamer from the University of Queensland.

Dr Wagner said the model challenged the assumption that increases in energy efficiency and conversion would offset increases in demand.

“We have successfully applied our model to world energy demand from 1950–2010 and demonstrated that increases in energy efficiency alone don’t offset the surge in in energy use per person,” he said.

“Simply put, as we get more efficient at manufacturing, goods get cheaper and we buy more.”

Nations at the 2015 UN Conference on Climate Change agreed to keep the rise in global average temperature below 2 degrees Celsius, preferably limiting it to 1.5 degrees to protect island states.

“Our model shows we may have less time left than expected to prevent world temperature from rising above these thresholds,” Professor Hankamer said.

“World population is forecast to increase to over 9 billion people by 2050, which, together with international pro-growth strategies, will lead to continually increasing energy demand.”

Professor Hankamer said it was vital to move from CO2-emitting fossil fuels and tap into renewable resources to accommodate these increases while controlling temperature.

“The sun is by far the largest renewable energy source,” he said.

“In just two hours it delivers enough solar energy to the Earth’s surface to power the entire global economy for a year—and now is the time to make the switch.

“A cost-neutral strategy that governments should consider to fast track this transition is diverting the $500 billion used to subsidise the fossil fuel industry internationally to assist the global renewable sector.”

Dr Wagner said massive increases in energy consumption would be necessary to alleviate poverty for the nearly 50 per cent of the world’s population who live on less than $2.50 a day.

“We have a choice: leave people in poverty and speed towards dangerous global warming through the increased use of fossil fuels, or transition rapidly to renewables.

The research has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Learn more about studying environmental sciences or business at Griffith University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, March 14th, 2016

Griffith climate change expert presents at World Science Festival Brisbane

Griffith climate change expert Brendan Mackey recently headlined the World Science Festival Brisbane as part of a panel discussion about ways to save Australia’s iconic reefs from decline.

Director of Griffith’s Climate Change Response Program Professor Mackey provided a policy perspective on how Australia, and the world, needs to adapt to climate change before it’s too late.

Griffith University Environmental Sciences

Professor Brendan Mackey (Photo credit: Griffith University)

“We are locked into climate change for thousands of years,” he said.

“Even if we stop burning fossil fuels tomorrow it will keep disrupting the climate system so we have to learn to live with it.

“Climate change adaptation is not something you do once; it needs to become part of our thinking and planning in all sectors and at the moment we are doing this very poorly.”

The panel discussion, led by the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, focused on how to achieve a global approach to save the world’s reefs.

Professor Mackey’s latest research project explores the impact of climate change on the coastal zone of the Pacific Ocean in Melanesia.

“We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to this research by collaborating with social scientists, micro-economists, ecologists, ocean current modelers and system analysts,” he said.

“In the long term, sea levels will keep rising and ocean currents are changing with rising temperatures. All of this will lead to big changes in the coastal zones, so we are trying to understand what is happening.

“We will be providing solutions and approaches to help people adapt to these changes in ecologically and culturally appropriate ways.”

Griffith University was an academic partner of the World Science Festival Brisbane, which was held March 9 to 13.

The annual festival (this year held in Brisbane) takes science out of the laboratory and into the streets, parks, museums, galleries and premier performing arts venues of Brisbane’s Cultural Precinct in South Banks.

A range of Griffith’s experts joined international leaders from across science and the arts for four action-packed days of public science at its best.

A Griffith expert in 3D scanning was also featured as a key presenter at the festival when he uncovered the secrets behind the WWI German war tank Mephisto.

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Find out more about studying environmental sciences and other sciences at Griffith University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Griffith helping to clean up the local environment

Griffith University played an important role for the local environment recently with its BeachCare group hosting not one, but two Clean Up Australia Day events.

Griffith University environmental sciences

BeachCare is a coastal community engagement initiative facilitated by the Griffith Centre for Coastal Management (Image: Griffith University)

BeachCare is a coastal community engagement initiative facilitated by the Griffith Centre for Coastal Management in partnership with the City of Gold Coast. The program aims to provide an opportunity for community members to participate in caring for their local coastal environments through the planting of native dune species, weed removal and litter collection and auditing.

Held March 6, the Clean Up Australia events aimed to inspire and empower communities to clean up, fix up and conserve our environment.

“Every year Australia-wide, hundreds of thousands of Australians get stuck in and clean up their local environment by collecting and removing rubbish,” says Beachcare co-ordinator Tegan Croft.

“The importance of the role of our dunes in the overall management of our beach can’t be overstated,” says Professor Rodger Tomlinson, Director of the Centre for Coastal Management. “A healthy dune means our beaches will recover faster after storm events. I really encourage the community to get involved in looking after our beaches through the BeachCare program.”

Griffith School of Environment

The Griffith School of Environment was thought of as revolutionary; today it is more important than ever. Over that time the environment and sustainable practice has evolved from a fringe issue to a mainstream challenge to government, industry and even individual households. Griffith is helping society to face those challenges.

The university has expanded on their initial programs to offer not only environmental and natural sciences but also urban planning and architecture with a focus on sustainable development. Griffith University’s undergraduate and postgraduate degree programs include

  • architecture;
  • ecology;
  • environmental sciences;
  • environmental management;
  • marine science; and
  • urban and environmental planning.

The Griffith School of Environment has the largest group of environmental professionals in any university in Australia, and among the largest in the world.

Apply to Griffith University School of Environment!

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Would you like more information about studying environmental sciences at Griffith University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.