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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Environmental Science Programs’

Friday, October 20th, 2017

Unlimited options: What would you like to study in Australia?

OzTREKK Blog: by Admissions Officer Heather Brown

As the admissions officer for undergraduate and postgraduate programs here at OzTREKK, I have learned about some awesome program options available to students!

Did you know that there are genetic counselling degrees available? Are you passionate about underwater archaeology? Have you always wanted to learn more about marine biology and study it in an awesome climate? These are all great choices for students to consider and our Australian university partners are always looking for Canadians to apply. Also, studying these programs in Oz may give you a competitive edge with unique placement opportunities that are not available here in Canada.

Whether you want to apply to unique or typical programs, studying an undergrad or postgrad program would be exciting if you have the opportunity to live in and travel Australia! Here are some of my favourites!

Unlimited options: What would you like to study in Australia?

Study environmental sciences at an Australian university!

Master of Integrated Water Management

The Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland is one of the few courses in the world that takes a truly transdisciplinary, integrated approach to water management in both developed and developing country contexts. What makes this degree so interesting is that it is co-badged and co-delivered by leading industry practitioners and lecturers from International WaterCentre’s founding member universitiesUniversity of Queensland, Monash University, Griffith University, and the University of Western Australia—all OzTREKK Australian university partners, btw.

The Master of Integrated Water Management creates water leaders by drawing on international teaching and research from many fields to provide a whole-of-water-cycle approach. Students get the skills to consider the impacts of decisions systemically across environment, politics, law, science, culture, engineering, economics, health and society.

Oh yeah, and they have scholarships for this.

Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 2 years
Next available intake: February 2019

Apply to the UQ Master of Integrated Water Management!

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Master of Genetic Counselling

The University of Melbourne’s 2-year Master of Genetic Counselling is designed to build and increase skills and breadth in clinical practice and research, utilising the expertise of tutors who are clinicians, genetic counsellors, scientists, people with a disability and community members. The program teaches counselling skills, research skills and clinical genetics knowledge in small interactive student groups.

Program: Master of Genetic Counselling
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Melbourne Master of Genetic Counselling degree!

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Master of Science in Marine Biology and Ecology

James Cook University is the leading education and research institution for marine biology in the Tropics. JCU’s location allows students and research staff ready access to a wide variety of tropical marine systems including coral reefs, tropical estuaries, mangrove habitats and seagrass beds. Links between research and teaching programs ensure that students are at the cutting edge of marine research.

Program: Master of Science (Marine Biology and Ecology)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: February and July
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to the Master of Science at James Cook University!

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If you are interested in applying to an undergraduate or postgraduate degree that’s beyond the “ordinary,” email me at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355—I’m here to help!

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Monash to become first 100 percent renewable energy powered university in Australia

By the year 2030, Monash University expects all of the energy used on its campuses will be clean and renewable.

Monash to become Australia's first 100 per cent renewable energy powered university

Solar panels at Clayton campus (Photo: Monash University)

The university is investing $135 million to achieve its aim with a project called Net Zero.

Monash University President and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Margaret Gardner AO, said the Net Zero initiative was the most ambitious project of its kind undertaken by an Australian university.

“Leadership in sustainability, of the kind to which Monash aspires requires much more than being carbon neutral by offsetting emissions through carbon credits or similar mechanisms. The university strives to completely eliminate its dependence on fossil fuels,” Professor Gardner said.

“Monash is actively reducing its emissions and, by transforming our energy infrastructure and following a deep decarbonisation strategy, ensuring that all the energy we use on our campuses is clean.”

As well as committing to net zero carbon emissions from their Australian campuses, all of Monash’s operations will also be carbon neutral by 2030.

Residual emissions from operations—such as plane travel—will be offset by purchasing certified and socially conscious carbon offset programs.

“Clean affordable and reliable energy is something that we all want. This target is about putting our world-leading research and campuses to work to show that a 100-percent renewable future is not only possible, but good for business and the planet too,” said Monash Engineering and Sustainability Manager Dr Rob Brimblecombe.

Net Zero is not an overnight revolution. Monash has been greening itself for some time, beginning in 2005 when the university began measuring its performance in emissions, energy use, waste, water and transport. It then set an energy reduction target of 20 percent based on those early measurements.

In 2010 the first solar panels went in on each campus.

Now there are more than 4,000 panels in place, enough to power 100 average Australian households.

Building is now underway at the Clayton campus for an on-site microgrid that will help the university control when and how energy is used.

The Monash microgrid will be connected to the Victorian energy grid, which in the future can reduce the demand and strain on the network during peak times.

The state government, through the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), contributed $100,000 seed funding for the Monash Microgrid.

The Net Zero Initiative is set to directly benefit research at the university, which is building the microgrid to model and assess the performance of energy network systems.

“The Monash Microgrid will provide a real-world example demonstrating how communities can keep their energy system affordable and resilient, in particular during peak periods and extreme weather events,” said Director of the Monash Energy Materials and Systems Institute, Dr Jacek Jasieniak.

“We’re using our campuses and research to develop scalable clean energy solutions that can be tested here and deployed around the world,” Dr Jasieniak said.

By the end of 2020, the university will complete its biggest solar roll out. By then, it will be generating 7 GWh of energy, the equivalent of powering 1,000 homes in Victoria for a year.

The project supports the concept of Monash as a living lab, with research and teaching linked to operational sustainability.

Monash University is also eliminating gas and moving to 100 percent electricity.

“By 2030 all of our energy consumption will be electric and from renewable sources,” Professor Gardner said.

The university is also reducing the overall energy consumption of their operations. This includes updating all of their campus lighting to LED, ensuring sustainability certification of all new buildings, and only investing in appliances and equipment that are energy efficient.

Monash University is asking

  • How do you make Australia’s economy carbon neutral?
  • How do we solve the water crisis?
  • What does a sustainable city look like?

While the researchers, educators, partners and funders may speak different “languages” (science, the arts, engineering and policy for example) they are working together to achieve a common purpose.

The Monash Sustainability Institute programs and initiatives investigate how to build water-sensitive cities and better manage water resources. They are catalysing action across Australia’s economy to reduce greenhouse emissions and valuing and integrating indigenous knowledge to help manage natural resources, putting environmental sustainability at the centre of decision making. Monash is understanding and influencing human behaviour, training and educating the next generation of leaders in sustainability, and much more.

Apply to a Monash Environmental Sciences Program!

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Would you like to study sustainability? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com for more information.

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

UQ marine scientists expose planetary emergency in new Netflix doc

A new Netflix documentary, Chasing Coral, has hit the world’s small screens.

UQ marine scientists expose planetary emergency in new Netflix documentary

Chasing Coral poster (Image via UQ)

The University of Queensland’s Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg was the chief scientific adviser on the documentary, which starkly records and reveals the impact of climate change on the world’s coral reefs.

Emmy award-winning filmmaker Jeff Orlowski’s film follows a team of divers, photographers and scientists on the epic ocean adventure.

Professor Hoegh-Guldberg plays a starring role in the documentary along with UQ marine scientists Dr Pim Bongaerts, Dr Manuel Gonzalez-Rivero, Professor Justin Marshall, and other world-renowned coral reef experts.

Professor Hoegh-Guldberg said the documentary was a powerful way to reveal the impact climate change is having on our reefs.

“This is as much about the emotional side of reef losses as it is about the compelling science behind this planetary emergency,” he said.

For the past three years, Jeff and his team have followed the work of The Ocean Agency, revealing the global bleaching event and its impacts on the world’s coral reefs.

Audiences will witness the painful process as the team invent the first ever time-lapse camera to record coral bleaching as it happens. The effort is anything but straightforward as the scientists doggedly battle technical malfunctions and the force of nature below the waves.

With its breathtaking photography, nail-biting suspense, and startling emotion, Chasing Coral is a dramatic production.

The film is the result of more than 650 hours spent underwater, footage from volunteers in 30 countries, as well as support from more than 500 people from across the world.

Chasing Coral by Exposure Labs premiered on Netflix, and was produced in association with Argent Pictures, The Kendeda Fund and in partnership with The Ocean Agency and View Into the Blue.

Master of Environmental Management at the University of Queensland

Environmental management is the planning and implementation of actions geared to improve the quality of the human environment. The postgraduate programs in environmental management at UQ are multidisciplinary programs designed to enhance the skills and technical expertise of graduates working in all facets of the environmental arena. The programs aim to produce managers able to address the many issues in the highly complex and changing area of environmental management. At the master’s level the degree may be taken in a range of fields.

Studies may be undertaken in the following specialisations:

  • Conservation biology
  • Conservation and Natural Resource Management
  • Resource and Environmental Economics
  • Sustainable Development

Why study Conservation Biology?
One of the biggest problems confronting biologists worldwide is the increased extinction rate of animal and plant species. This is due in large part to the impact humans have had on land use, climate and resource consumption—an impact that is decreasing the earth’s biodiversity and increasing the number of endangered or threatened species at an alarming rate. Conservation biology is an integrative discipline that focuses on the problems of restoring and maintaining viable populations of animal and plant species, and natural and managed ecosystems. The program aims to provide core theoretical and practical training in conservation biology.

Program: Master of Environmental Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years

Admissions requirements

Bachelor degree in environmental studies, geography, natural resources, biology, ecology, conservation, sustainable development, environmental engineering, marine science, or an approved discipline. UQ or equivalent GPA of 4.5 or above on a 7 point scale.

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Are you interested in studying environmental sciences or marine science at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Heather Brown for more information at heather@oztrekk.com.

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

University of Sydney researchers are working on turning waste into new innovations for the health, agriculture, transport and construction industries. Here’s how:

1. Orange peel: a cure for cancer?

Every year around a third of food produced for human consumption is never eaten. That’s around 1.3 billion tonnes of food that is wasted. But University of Sydney research is breathing new life into these leftovers and using them to make people healthier.

From orange peel to malformed mushrooms, a lot of food waste is rich in nutrients that are vital for people’s well-being and can be used in our diet. Professor Fariba Dehghani is one of the scientists turning these scraps into life-saving medicine.

Professor Dehghani explains how her team is using waste in a meaningful way in a video, below, produced in association with the Sydney Morning Herald.

2. Seabed delicacy: a cold sore treatment?

Did you know the blue blood of abalone could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus?

A team of chemical engineers and virologists at the University of Sydney found that the sea snail’s anti-viral properties could block the herpes virus’s entry into cells.

3. Turning algae into renewable jet fuel

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

Turning algae into jet fuel (Photo: University of Sydney)

A native freshwater algae grown in northern Australia can be used to create a high-quality, renewable jet fuel. A multi-disciplinary team including researchers from the University of Sydney, James Cook University and Israel’s Ben Gurion University has developed a proof-of-concept process to create high-quality renewable biofuel from the macroalgae, Oedogonium, ready for blending with regular gasoline, jet fuel and diesel.

4. Pee on the pods

Urine could be successfully recycled to fertilise crops, according to university researchers. A team from the University of Sydney School of Civil Engineering has examined the effectiveness of reusing nutrients from human waste and say there is growing evidence that the use of human urine in agriculture is completely viable.

5. A concrete idea for reusing industrial waste

The university’s School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is investigating new technologies for the sustainable processing of industrial waste and by-products. One example of this could see fly ash—a byproduct of coal combustion—used as a supplement in concrete mix and its manufacture.

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Would you like more information about studying civil engineering or environmental sciences at the University of Sydney? Email OzTREKK Admissions Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Scholarships for Master of Integrated Water Management are available

Master of Integrated Water Management Scholarships

Are you interested in joining a global community of leaders that is changing the way we tackle complex water management challenges?

The International WaterCentre (IWC) provides education and training, applied research and knowledge services to implement a whole-of-water cycle approach and develop capacity in integrated water resource management.

Scholarships for Master of Integrated Water Management are available

Brisbane’s City Cat ferries rely on proper water management

The International WaterCentre (IWC) is offering a full scholarships for high-calibre candidates accepted into the Master of Integrated Water Management (MIWM) commencing in Semester 1, 2018.

Up to two full tuition and full living costs scholarships (Type A – each valued at AUD 92,645* including tuition fees and living costs);
and one full tuition scholarship (valued at AUD $52,500*). *Scholarships values are subject to change and are relevant for the 2017 intake.

  • July 31, 2017: Applications close
  • August 23, 2017: Shortlisted applicants will be notified (via email)
  • November 1, 2017: Scholarships Selection Panel will make a final decision on successful recipients (by this date)
  • February 2018: the IWC Master of Integrated Water Management will commence at the University of Queensland

Eligibility requirements

To apply for a scholarship, you must

  • have completed an undergraduate degree in a related field of study from an internationally recognised institution; and
  • have at least two years of professional experience (paid work or volunteering experience) relevant to the program.

Although professional experience is not essential for admission in the MIWM program, candidates with relevant professional experience have a higher chance of securing a scholarship.

Selection criteria

The Scholarship Selection Panel will use the following selection criteria to assess and rank applications:

  1. Leadership qualities: including collaboration and teamwork, flexibility, initiative, communication skills, integrity and vision through professional, educational, community and other achievements.
  2. Professional and volunteering record: relevant employment and volunteering experience, achievements, membership of professional bodies and professional references.
  3. Academic record: an excellent academic record and a likelihood of success in further study.
  4. Commitment to promoting and driving the implementation of collaborative, whole-of-water-cycle, integrated and interdisciplinary approaches to water management.
  5. Potential outcomes: the likelihood of positive impacts on the individual and the water sector from participating in the MIWM program.

About the Master of Integrated Water Management

The Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland is one of the few courses in the world that takes a truly transdisciplinary, integrated approach to water management in both developed and developing country contexts. The degree is co-badged and co-delivered by leading industry practitioners and lecturers from International WaterCentre’s  founding member universities: University of Queensland, Monash University, Griffith University, and the University of Western Australia.

The Master of Integrated Water Management (MIWM) creates water leaders by drawing on international teaching and research from many fields to provide a transdisciplinary, whole-of-water-cycle approach. Students get the skills to consider the impacts of decisions systemically across environment, politics, law, science, culture, engineering, economics, health and society.

Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Do you have questions about the Master of Integrated Water Management at the University of Queensland? Please contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, June 12th, 2017

University of Queensland sweeps $22.6m in research funding

The University of Queensland has topped the nation by securing funding for more research projects than any other Australian university in the prestigious Australian Research Council grants announced in Canberra on June 5, with 17 projects set to share a total of $22.6 million.

University of Queensland sweeps $22.6m in research funding

UQ has been awarded funding for more research projects than any other university in Australia

UQ’s exceptional honour roll includes two new ARC Australian Laureate Fellowships, 14 ARC Future Fellowships and funding for an ARC Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging Technology.

The 17 grants have been awarded to UQ research projects spanning biotechnology, electrochemical energy, ecological impacts of cattle production, antibiotic resistance, cultural history, quantum systems, and atomic physics.

UQ Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said it was an outstanding result for UQ and again demonstrated the strength of the university’s research.

“UQ has been awarded funding for more research projects than any other university in Australia, and we ranked number two for total funding, with $22.6 million in grants,” Professor Høj said.

“UQ has won the lion’s share of ARC Future Fellowships funding, securing $12.1 million which accounts for 15.7 per cent of the total $77 million in grants.

“These results underscore UQ as the destination of choice, given that we have been awarded more ARC Future Fellowships across the life of the scheme than any other university, and it comes less than a week after our researchers were awarded $4.3 million for 12 ARC Linkage Projects.

“This is a real testament to the quality of researchers we have at the university,” he said.

“I’m delighted to note that six of UQ’s 14 new Future Fellows are women.

“There is also an excellent spread of Future Fellowships across UQ’s broad areas of research, with five going to researchers in humanities and other non-science disciplines.”

ARC Australian Laureate Fellowships have been awarded to Professor George Zhao, who is working to develop sustainable electrochemical energy storage technology, wastewater resource recovery expert Professor Zhiguo Yuan.

Professor Zhao, of UQ’s School of Chemical Engineering, will get $2.8 million over five years for research to develop next-generation energy storage applications based upon sodium-ion capacitors.

Professor Yuan, director of UQ’s Advanced Water Management Centre, will get $2.9 million over five years for research into bioconversion of methane into higher-value liquid chemicals.

“Professor Yuan’s work on biotechnology solutions through the cost-effective production of liquid chemicals from biogas could propel Australia to the forefront of sustainable resources research,” Professor Høj said.

The University of Queensland will have a new ARC Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging Technology, backed by $4.7 million in ARC funding and an additional $1 million provided by industry partners.

The centre will train 20 industry-ready innovation scientists to tackle skills gaps in radiochemistry and diagnostic imaging in Australia’s medical technologies and pharmaceuticals sector.

The centre will draw together leading researchers and industry partners to develop novel diagnostics, therapeutics and theranostics for cost-effective diagnostic imaging and improved health outcomes.

Professor Høj said UQ’s powerful performance across the ARC funding projects was further evidence of the university’s commitment to supporting leading researchers and enabling them to create positive change.

Discover more about studying at the University of Queensland!

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017

Monash University medical student joins Antarctica expedition to inspire environmental change

A desire to drive sustainable energy use, and love of solving challenging problems has won a Monash University student a prestigious Boston Consulting Group (BCG) scholarship. One of only two scholarships awarded annually in Australia and New Zealand, Daniel D’Hotman will now embark on a trip to Antarctica early next year.

Daniel’s $15,000 scholarship means he joins the last 60 miles (96.6 km) of the 600-mile (966 km) South Pole Energy Challenge (SPEC). Conducted on foot, it’s the first polar expedition to rely completely on renewable energy, and is renowned explorer Robert Swan’s last South Pole voyage.

Monash University medical student joins Antarctica expedition to inspire environmental change

A Monash Medical School student will be embarking on an Antarctic expedition

A fourth-year Monash University Medical School student, Daniel said the South Pole expedition was an amazing opportunity to inspire change in the way we use energy.

“I believe the risk of catastrophic climate change poses a major existential threat to current and future generations—no matter what field you’re in—and I wanted to be part of something that would have a global impact,” Daniel said.

Using this expedition as a platform for engagement, the group wants to challenge and inspire people to make measurable changes to how they use energy in their businesses, communities, and lifestyles. Daniel also plans to work with sponsors, such as Shell and Patagonia, to launch a social impact fund that will drive change in the way we use energy.

“On a personal level,” he said, “I revel in a challenge, and the prospect of walking in the most hostile environment on earth is very exciting.”

This once-in-a-lifetime adventure is only one part of the prize. Daniel will also have the opportunity to work with BCG after graduation.

It’s a prestigious honour, and one that came about after a rigorous selection process involving three rounds of interviews, where BCG sought out high-performing students with strong leadership qualities and a love of “solving challenging problems.”

As a medical student at Monash, Daniel is passionate about mobilising groups of individuals to promote collaboration and engineer societal change. Earlier this year, he led the launch of the philanthropic movement Effective Altruism in Australia, and the charity has raised more than $800,000 for public health interventions in its first year.

While Daniel enjoys clinical medicine and clearly has a passion for the environment, he hopes to pursue a future in public policy to ensure the future equity and sustainability of Australia’s health system.

“My Monash placements in rural Victoria offered insight into the stark contrast in health outcomes between these areas and inner-city Melbourne,” he said. “This prompted my interest in health equity; a person’s health should not be dictated by their postcode.”

After his second year of Monash University Medical School, Daniel completed his Bachelor of Medical Science (Hons) at the University of Oxford, working with philosophers including Monash Professor Julian Savulescu. This experience introduced him to the world of bioethics and policy.

“Oxford really opened my eyes to power of public policy, and inspired me to pursue a career in the field,” he said.

Daniel believes that rising costs of healthcare and an ageing population may threaten the viability of Australia’s health system this century. However, he said that technology could offer powerful solutions.

“Australia is uniquely positioned to take advantage of advances in artificial intelligence, big data, and biotechnology to guarantee the quality of our health system into the future. I’m excited to expand my knowledge of these areas through working at BCG.”

Study Medicine at Monash University

The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine at Monash University has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise to ensure that graduates are prepared for their future as a doctor.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the Monash University medical program!

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Would you like more information about studying at Monash University Medical School? Contact Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

JCU marine biology student explains how to get volunteer experience while studying in Australia

Remember JCU marine biology student Kessia? Well, she’s back with more great advice. This time, Kessia chats about gaining valuable volunteer experience while you are studying in Australia!

When I first started uni, all the lecturers encouraged us to get volunteering experience. Lots of emphasis was put on it and we were told how this was the way to get a job in the future. Volunteering allows you to put into practice what you have learned in your lectures to the real-world situations.

JCU marine biology student: How to get volunteer experience while studying

Volunteering with the Australian Marine Conservation Society on Magnetic Island (Photo: JCU)

I’ve put together a few tips on how to get volunteering, more specifically in the science field.

  1. Talk to your lecturers

This is the best way to get your first volunteering experience. If you are interested in a particular field, then talk to the lecturer and ask if they can point you in the right direction in terms of volunteering. You never know, they might have some opportunity for you. In first year, it is sometimes intimidating to go up and talk to the lecturer in a class of 100 students. But do not let the class size stop you. Most lecturers will appreciate your interest in their field of study and will be happy to give you advice.

  1. Join the volunteer list at JCU

There is a database for students willing to volunteer for PhD candidates who might need a hand. Once you join the email list, you will receive emails from students who are looking for a couple of hands to help collect data on the field or help with laboratory work and so on. Some of my friends have been able to go on trips such as collecting seagrass for dugong surveys, or collecting water samples from Ross River.  I have had the opportunity to deploy underwater cameras around Hinchinbrook Island. It was definitely a rewarding experience, one that I will do again if I get the chance.

  1. Join the Facebook group

Each college at JCU has a Facebook group. For example, for marine biologists and other environmental courses, the JCU College of Biological, Marine & Environmental Sciences (BioMES) has a Facebook page where students sometimes post about volunteering or job opportunities. You can find come precious information on this group about lots of things. I highly recommend joining the group related to your faculty.

  1. TropWater

The group offers internships to students for a semester in different fields, including aquaculture, mangrove habitats, wetlands, etc. TropWater applications are due a semester before. It offers hands-on experience and you get to work with people who are experts in their field.

  1. Research facilities

James Cook University has a several research facilities on campus including MACRO which works with macroalgae; MARFU, the aquarium complex; MBD, the microalgae site; or EGRU, Geology Research Centre among others. If you talk to the right people, you can get volunteering opportunities at those research centres which are right on campus. From feeding fish, to laboratory work, to cleaning tanks, there is a lot you can learn at those facilities. Even more so, you can volunteer at the Orpheus Island research centre and while helping with cleaning duties, you can spend the rest of your day snorkeling in the amazing protected marine park. You would be required to be on the island for a week or so but it is worth it. Don’t forget to get yourself an Orpheus shirt so you can brag about it to your friends.

  1. Other organisations

There are various other organisations you can volunteer with, including the Australian Marine Conservation Society, an amazing organisation that sensitizes the public on how human-induced impacts on the reef such as coal mining.

  • Australian Marine Conservation Society on Magnetic Island
  • Conservation Volunteers Australia
  • NQ Dry Tropics – helps with beach clean-ups
  • Reek Check Australia – they offer training programs on how to collect data on the reef
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science – A government organisation that runs several research experiments on the Great Barrier Reef. You would need a supervisor/lecturer willing to sponsor your volunteering there.
  • Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
  • Reef HQ

From my own experience, I have found volunteering very rewarding and have learnt a lot in different fields. Talking to people in the field and seeing what it means to apply all I learnt in classes is eye-opening. Do not be discouraged if you find it hard to get any volunteering in the first few years. The more you talk to lecturers or other students, the easier you will find volunteering opportunities. Ask questions! Even if it is not related to your field of interest, having skills and experience in different fields can be beneficial for when you are applying for a job later. The more volunteering you do, the more experience and knowledge you will acquire. This is the hands-on stuff you will need for a job! So, go out there and take the opportunities given to you.

Read Kessia’s other blog, 5 reasons to study marine biology at James Cook University

Marine biology at JCU

Think you might be interested in marine biology? JCU’s location in the tropics allows students and research staff ready access to a wide variety of tropical marine systems including coral reefs, tropical estuaries, mangrove habitats and seagrass beds. Links between research and teaching programs ensure that students are at the cutting edge of marine research.

Program: Master of Science (Marine Biology and Ecology)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: July or February
Application deadline: June 29 and January 30 each year
Entry requirements: Completion of a recognised, appropriate undergraduate degree attaining a minimum of 65% or equivalent prior learning including appropriate professional experience.

Apply to the Master of Science at James Cook University!

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Are you interested in studying marine biology at James Cook University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information!

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017

University of Queensland leads Australia in ranking of top-10-rated subjects

The University of Queensland leads Australia and places 42nd globally in a new subject ranking that encompasses more than 26,000 higher education institutions.

The established Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) inaugural subject rankings highlight outstanding universities in science and social science, based on the numbers of research articles published in top-tier journals.

University of Queensland leads Australia in ranking of top-10-rated subjects

Find out how you can study biodiversity conservation at UQ!

UQ has 13 subjects in the global top 10—more than any other Australian university—and features in rank one for Biodiversity Conservation, rank two for Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism and rank three for Marine and Freshwater Biology.

UQ Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said he was thrilled that the university ranked so highly.

“This achievement showcases the hard work that our researchers and academics put in to science and social science across UQ,” he said.

“A number-one ranking in Biodiversity Conservation is an incredible achievement and underscores the impressive research firepower we bring to protecting the world’s species.

“It’s why outstanding philanthropists such as the Turner Foundation partner with us to deliver multi-million conservation projects—they know they are collaborating with the best in the world.”

With a global ranking of 42, UQ is one of only two Australian universities in the world top 50.

“To be ranked so highly by a centre that bases its results purely on research output reinforces other measures such as the Nature Ranking,” Professor Høj said. “It highlights the breadth of multidisciplinary research and knowledge we can deploy to tackle the major challenges of the 21st Century, and to create change to build a better world.”

The University of Queensland ranked worldwide as follows:

World Rank Subject
1 Biodiversity Conservation
2 Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism
3 Marine & Freshwater Biology
4 Water Resources
6 Ecology
6 Engineering, Environmental
6 Environmental Sciences
7 Sport Sciences
8 Environmental Studies
9 Anatomy & Morphology
9 Ergonomics
9 Rehabilitation
10 Tropical Medicine

The Center for World University Rankings publishes the largest academic ranking of global universities, drawing on data from Clarivate Analytics (previously the Intellectual Property and Science business of Thomson Reuters).

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Are you interested in studying environmental sciences programs at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, May 1st, 2017

James Cook University is No.1 in world for marine biology

James Cook University’s standing as a world leader in environmental sciences has been re-affirmed with JCU ranked No.1 in the world for marine biology, and No. 2 in the world for biodiversity conservation research.

Sydney Dental School

JCU is ranked No.1 in the world for marine biology (Photo: Mark Ziembecki)

The Centre for World University Rankings (CWUR) has released its inaugural subjects ranking, which compares more than 26,000 degree-granting institutions around the world.

CWUR ranked JCU as follows:

  • Marine & Freshwater Biology (World Rank: 1)
  • Biodiversity Conservation (World Rank: 2)
  • Overall, this ranks James Cook University #166 among global institutions with the most Top-10 placements.

Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor Professor Chris Cocklin said the ranking reflects JCU’s extremely strong research performance.

“To be ranked so highly in these subject areas is a great credit to our talented researchers. These results are consistent with our high standing in other global rankings for environmental and ecological sciences.

“JCU continues to deliver ground-breaking research, and we perform very strongly when compared to the world’s largest, most successful universities.”

The CWUR Rankings by Subject 2017 highlights the world’s elite universities in the sciences and the social sciences, based on the number and influence of research articles in top-tier journals.

Data is obtained from Clarivate Analytics (previously the Intellectual Property and Science business of Thomson Reuters).

JCU College of Marine and Environmental Sciences

As part of the Division of Tropical Environments and Societies, the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences promotes, fosters, supports and administers quality teaching and research at JCU in the areas of marine biology, environment, geography and sustainability, aquaculture and fisheries, and terrestrial ecosystems.

Marine science is the interdisciplinary study of the marine environment bringing together elements of marine biology, oceanography, marine geoscience and environmental management. Marine scientists explore the make-up and dynamics of the world’s oceans and use their skills to investigate and manage human impacts on the marine environment; understand and utilise ocean resources; and manage and protect our marine reserves.

JCU’s location in the tropics allows students and research staff ready access to a wide variety of tropical marine systems including coral reefs, tropical estuaries, mangrove habitats and seagrass beds. Links between research and teaching programs ensure that students are at the cutting edge of marine research.

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Are you interested in marine biology? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information about environmental sciences degrees available at James Cook University!