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Articles categorized as ‘University of Newcastle Engineering School’

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

Newcastle engineering researchers’ innovative heat conversion technology wins award

A University of Newcastle revolutionary clean energy technology scooped the pool at the 2015 Newcastle Engineering Excellence Awards.

GRANEX®, the innovative heat conversion technology invented by researchers Professor Behdad Moghtaderi and Dr Elham Doroodchi, won a Newcastle Engineering Excellence Award and was named overall Newcastle Division winner, sponsored by GHD, at the event at Newcastle Town Hall.

University of Newcastle Engineering School

Study at the University of Newcastle

A partnership between Granite Power Limited, the University of Newcastle (UON), Newcastle Innovation, the Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources (NIER) and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA), this breakthrough technology is currently being used at a demonstration power plant at Wallsend Swimming Centre, delivering low cost, year-round pool heating.

The GRANEX® demonstration plant comprises a 200-kilowatt field of parabolic solar collectors plus related power block and thermal storage elements.

Invented by Newcastle School of Engineering Professor Moghtaderi and Dr Doroodchi and developed by Granite Power, GRANEX® uses any available heat sources, such as industrial waste heat, solar and geothermal energy sources to generate low cost, zero carbon emission electricity.

Professor Moghtaderi said the Wallsend demonstration project provided working proof that the technology generated electricity for commercial use or sale into the Grid, improved productivity and quickly paid for itself.

“This project demonstrates the financial rewards of the GRANEX® technology in a market searching for productivity gains and where rising electricity costs are a constant threat to commercial competitiveness.

“GRANEX® has the potential to reduce fuel use for remote industrial sites currently reliant on diesel power generation including mining and the oil and gas sector and to maximise solar thermal power generation.

“Alongside the tangible cost saving benefit to industry, this technology will have widespread social impacts in reducing the need for diesel generation in remote Australian communities.”

What began as a small-scale consultancy project by Professor Moghtaderi for Granite Power through Newcastle Innovation (the UON’s commercial arm), GRANEX® is now a commercially licensed, patented technology with wide application and huge potential.

The demonstration power plant is an Australian Government initiative with funding from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency.

Engineers Australia Division president Michael van Koeverden said the awards program encourages and celebrates engineering by identifying, recognising and promoting excellence in engineering.

As the overall Newcastle winner, the Solar-GRANEX Wallsend Pool project is now a finalist for a national Engineers Australia Excellence award.

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Would you like more information about engineering programs at the Newcastle School of Engineering? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

University of Newcastle “Uni Tune In” app

A free University of Newcastle app has been developed to help students improve their assignment and study skills at university.

University of Newcastle IT School

Check out the new Uni Tune In app

Uni Tune In features 17 short videos that focus on different academic areas including note-taking, understanding assessments and academic reading and writing.

Uni Tune In is free and available to download from the Apple App store.

The videos are integrated into the app so once it is downloaded no internet is needed to view the videos.

Uni Tune In was a collaborative effort between Erica Southgate, Suzanne Macqueen, Deb Bradbery and Jill Scevak from the Newcastle School of Education and Shamus Smith from the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

The project was supported by the Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education through the Commonwealth Higher Education Participation and Partnership Program.

University of Newcastle School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

The School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. offers undergraduate and postgraduate study in Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Software Engineering, Telecommunications and Computer Science. In conjunction with the School of Engineering, the university also offers undergraduate study in Mechatronics.

These University of Newcastle programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, Newcastle received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Apply to Newcastle Engineering/IT School!

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Learn more about studying Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Newcastle! Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about how you can study in Australia.

Friday, February 27th, 2015

Newcastle Engineering knows what’s cool about math

The team behind the University of Newcastle‘s highly successful ‘What is Engineering?’ video has now created ‘The cool maths behind engineering’ to encourage higher participation in mathematics.

This short educational STEM video is targeted mainly at high school students—especially those who are looking to study engineering at university.

The animation brings to life the math and engineering behind: the New York Times Square fireworks display, a parachute jump from space and generating renewable energy in Denmark.

We get a glimpse of the equations and calculations involved in determining mass, launch velocity, terminal velocity, drag coefficient, wind resistance and power generation capacity.

In addition to mathematics, it touches on the applications of aerospace engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, mechatronics engineering and software engineering.

This is the latest in a line of ‘explainer’ videos created by the Newcastle Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, available on their YouTube Channel.

About the University of Newcastle School of Engineering

The Newcastle School of Engineering is dedicated to research and training in the disciplines of Chemical, Civil, Environmental, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, and Surveying. The engineering school’s programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, the school received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy and Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

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Learn more about studying engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about how you can study in Australia.

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

Newcastle academics honoured with Excellence in Science and Engineering Awards

Two University of Newcastle academics have been honoured with prestigious accolades at the 2014 NSW Science and Engineering Awards.

UON’s Professor Nick Talley received the Excellence in Biological Sciences award, while Professor Behdad Moghtaderi was the recipient of the Renewable Energy Innovation award.

University of Newcastle

Study science and engineering at Newcastle

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) Professor Kevin Hall said the impressive results were further evidence of the university’s distinguished research reputation.

“Professor Talley and Professor Moghtaderi are at the forefront of their respective fields, and the university is delighted to see their outstanding contributions acknowledged,” Professor Hall said.

“We are immensely proud of both researchers’ achievements. The university’s continued success in these annual awards demonstrates the high calibre of our academics and their research outcomes.”

The NSW Science and Engineering Awards recognise the achievements of leading researchers and their efforts to generate economic, health, environmental or technological benefits for the state.

Professor Talley is an internationally renowned gastroenterological research leader, who specialises in unexplained disorders affecting nerves and muscles of the gut, including irritable bowel syndrome and severe indigestion. He has been credited with a number of seminal breakthroughs, and his latest work involving the link between the brain and the gut has the potential to revolutionise thinking across the field.

Professor Talley is President of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. In June last year, he was appointed the University of Newcastle‘s Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research). He is now on sabbatical undertaking further research at the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI).

Professor Moghtaderi is a world-leader energy technologies research, and was awarded the innovation prize for his GRANEX™ heat engine invention. The engine turns low-grade heat sources that may not otherwise be viably usable into emission-free electricity. It can be applied to a range of diverse heat sources, including renewable energy, process industries, transport systems and commercial and residential buildings.

Professor Moghtaderi is UON’s Head of Discipline of Chemical Engineering, as well as Director of the Frontier Energy Technologies Research Centre at the Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources (NIER).

University of Newcastle School of Engineering

The University of Newcastle School of Engineering is dedicated to research and training in the disciplines of Chemical, Civil, Environmental, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, and Surveying. The engineering school’s programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, the school received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy and Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

Science Programs at the University of Newcastle

The Faculty of Science and Information Technology has a strong commitment to fundamental and applied research with equally high international standards. They support a broad-based program over a wide range of research activities. Within the schools they have established international reputations and formed strong, viable research groups and are increasing their industry partnerships in the Hunter region and beyond through applied research and development collaborations.

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Learn more about studying science and engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about how you can study in Australia.

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Master of Energy scholarship

The Master of Energy Studies is a 1.5-year program that provides students with a solid practical and theoretical knowledge of energy management, climate change and sustainability.

The program has a strong industry focus, with regular industry guest speakers, site visits and organised network events. 

Graduates of the program will be equipped as future industry, government, research and community leaders with the skills and expertise to address energy challenges and devise solutions for a sustainable future.

The program is coordinated by the International Energy Centre and delivered at three of Australia’s leading universities: The University of Queensland, The University of Western Australia, and The University of Newcastle, together with a host of other education collaborators.

Graduates receive a co-badged Master of Energy Studies by all three universities.

The Master of Energy Studies program is delivered via intensive mode. Each course is delivered over 5 consecutive business days at one of the member universities. Candidates need to travel interstate to complete the teaching blocks. After each block, students undertake online tutorials and assessments.

Glencore Energy Leader Scholarship

The Glencore Energy Leader Scholarships are prestigious scholarships awarded annually to talented energy professionals who have been accepted into the Master of Energy Studies.

2015 scholarships round
Applications are currently open for domestic and international students.

Scholarship value
Scholarship recipients receive AU$22,000 over the duration of the MES to assist with their tuition fees.

Who can apply?
Scholarships are available to eligible domestic and international applicants wishing to study the Master of Energy Studies program. The next program intake is scheduled for Semester 1, 2015 (February).

Please note: the scholarship is only available to study the Master of Energy Studies. It is not available for the Graduate Diploma/Certificate programs or for any other program offered by The University of Queensland or any other institutions.

Entry requirements
To be eligible for a scholarship, applicants must also apply for the Master of Energy Studies program and meet the program entry requirements:

  • A completed undergraduate degree from an internationally recognised institution
  • At least three years practical experience (paid work or volunteering experience) in a related field
  • International students must demonstrate their English language skills by taking an officially recognised test of English language proficiency.

Selection criteria
Successful scholarship candidates will possess an excellent academic record and several years of relevant professional experience. The IEC selection panel will use the following selection criteria when assessing scholarship applications:

  • Academic record: an excellent academic record and a likelihood of success in further study
  • Professional record: relevant employment experience, achievements, membership of professional bodies and professional references
  • Commitment to integrated and interdisciplinary approaches to energy studies
  • Leadership qualities including collaboration and team work, flexibility, initiative, communication skills, integrity and vision through professional, educational, community and other achievement
  • Potential outcomes: the likelihood of positive impacts on the individual and the energy sector from participating in the MES program.

Application deadline

Applications close for international students on September 15, 2014.
International applicants will be notified on or before October 15, 2014.

University of Queensland Master of Energy Studies

Program: Master of Energy Studies
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1.5 years

Apply to the UQ Engineering School!

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Do you have any questions about this scholarship opportunity and about the Master of Energy program at the UQ Engineering School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, March 10th, 2014

University of Newcastle Civil Engineering in world’s top 50

The University of Newcastle‘s Civil and Structural Engineering discipline has entered the world’s Top 50 in the most recent QS World University Rankings by Subject list increasing its ranking by 14 places up to 45th in the world.

Published by QS, the University of Newcastle has been ranked in the world’s top 100 universities for three subjects and in the top 200 universities for a further nine subjects.

The university’s Geography discipline ranked in the top 100 for the second year in a row, and Linguistics, which entered the QS World subject rankings last year, moved into the top 100 in 2014.

The University of Newcastle‘s other Engineering subjects, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, each ranked in the world’s top 200. The Environmental Sciences program debuted on the Top 200 list this year.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Caroline McMillen, said UON‘s excellent performance in the 2014 QS subject rankings built on the university’s growing global reputation for excellence in education, and research and innovation.

UON consistently ranks in the top three percent of universities in the world and in the top ten universities in Australia for research intensity. The latest QS subject rankings recognize the achievements of our staff who work hard across a range of disciplines to engage as global leaders who drive world-class innovation in our community and region,” she said.

The QS rankings were announced on the heels of an Australian Bureau of Statistics report, which found Australians with university-level qualifications in science, technology, engineering and maths had the best career outlook nationwide.

“Through our Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, which was rated by the Excellence in Research for Australia assessment exercise as one of the top five in the country, UON is delivering quality graduates and research and innovation  which contribute to Australia’s skills and productivity and to the economic transition of our region,” said Professor McMillen.

About the University of Newcastle School of Engineering

The School of Engineering is dedicated to research and training in the disciplines of Chemical, Civil, Environmental, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, and Surveying. The engineering school’s programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, the school received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy and Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

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Learn more about studying engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about engineering programs and about how you can study in Australia.

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Newcastle civil engineer named New Face of Civil Engineering

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) has named University of Newcastle research academic Dr James Hambleton as one of 10 New Faces of Civil Engineering.

University of Newcastle Engineering School

Study engineering at the University of  Newcastle

The New Faces program promotes the achievement of young civil engineers by highlighting their contributions to and impact on society.

Thirty-year-old Dr Hambleton, a research associate at the ARC Centre for Excellence in Geotechnical Science and Engineering, will be recognized for this honour at ASCE’s annual Outstanding Projects and Leaders (OPAL) Gala on March 20, 2014, in Arlington, Virginia.

His research has focused on the advancement of computational, analytical and experimental techniques in geomechanics. Applications of this research include the enhancement of field tests for identifying soil strength and the development of predication and mitigation techniques for land damage caused by off-road vehicles.

His findings have been shared in more than 25 publications and conference presentations. These efforts earned Dr Hambleton several awards, including the Neville GW Cook Award for Innovative Research in Geomechanics. He also serves as a reviewer on more than 10 international journals.

Civil engineering requires a wonderful combination of intuition and deduction. I can get my hands dirty while theorizing about the possibilities for getting my hands dirty,” the University of Newcastle researcher said.

Originally from Wisconsin, Dr Hambleton earned his bachelor, master and doctoral degrees from the University of Minnesota.

Dr Hambleton has been at the University of Newcastle since 2010 and currently teaches first year and final year civil engineering students. His first-year course curriculum focuses on introducing students to the many disciplines of civil engineering and engaging students in design projects. He also serves as principal supervisor for two PhD students, and co-supervises two others.

Founded in 1852, the American Society of Civil Engineers represents more than 145,000 civil engineers worldwide and is America’s oldest national engineering society.

University of Newcastle School of Engineering

The School of Engineering is dedicated to research and training in the disciplines of Chemical, Civil, Environmental, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, and Surveying.

The engineering school‘s programs are underpinned by some of the most exciting research in Australia. In the Australian Research Council 2012 research excellence ratings, the school received a top rating of 5 (well above world standard) for Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy and Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

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Learn more about studying engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about engineering programs and about how you can study in Australia.

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

University of Newcastle Laureate Professor receives Scientist of the Year award

University of Newcastle Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson AO has been awarded the NSW Scientist of the Year at the 2013 NSW Science and Engineering Awards held recently at Government House in Sydney.

Professor Jameson is a chemical engineer and inventor of the Jameson Cell, a revolutionary mineral processing technology that contributes more than three billion dollars to the national economy every year.

University of Newcastle

Study at the University of Newcastle

“Professor Jameson is a world leader in fluid and particle mechanics and his Jameson Cell could well be the most financially successful Australian invention in the past three decades,” said NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer, Professor Mary O’Kane.

Professor Jameson works with the Priority Research Centre for Advanced Particle Processing and Transport at the University of Newcastle and makes a critical contribution to the Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources (NIER), a multidisciplinary research hub that provides practical benefits to industry, the community and the economy by advancing research in clean energy production, energy efficiency and the minimization of carbon emissions.

“I don’t believe in minor changes,” said Professor Jameson of his research philosophy. “If you’re going to put your heart into something, you may as well tackle a problem that will make a difference because the effort will be the same.”

Professor Jameson said he had strong views about the value of research, science and technology for the benefit of the community.

“I’m an engineer and therefore what I like to do is fix particular problems that have proven difficult in the past for industry to overcome.”

Professor Jameson has spent 40 years focused on improving the effectiveness of mineral extraction.

The Jameson Cell alone has contributed more than $26 billion in Australian exports since its introduction in 1989, and there have been four version updates as the technology has improved. The Cell is now being extended to broader applications such as tar sand oil extraction and the removal of blue-green algae from waterways.

Making a “significant change” in the mining industry’s energy consumption is Professor Jameson’s next aim. His current project, the Fluidised Bed Flotation Device, has the potential halve the mining industry’s energy output.

This is the second year in a row the state’s most prestigious science and engineering award has gone to a University of Newcastle researcher; the 2012 NSW Scientist of the Year was the university’s Laureate Professor John Aitken.

“Last year we were the first university outside of a capital city to have won this award. This year we have achieved it again, which is a testament to the individuals, but also to the strength of research across the university,” said Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research), Professor Nick Talley.

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Find out more about studying science and engineering at the University of Newcastle. Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Monday, November 18th, 2013

University of Newcastle Engineering developing bushfire drones

A University of Newcastle mechatronics team is developing technology that could enable a wider use of robotic systems and reduce the extreme risk posed to Australian firefighters.

Associate Professor Tristan Perez from the University of Newcastle Engineering School is working with the Australian Department of Defence and leading companies like Boeing Research and Technology Australia to research and develop ground-breaking strategies for guidance, navigation, and motion control for a flock of next-generation intelligent autonomous vehicles (IAV).

University of Newcastle Engineering School

Newcastle, New South Wales

A/Prof Perez said IAV technology had the potential to minimize risk to firefighters by removing, as much as possible, humans from the dangerous front line.

“Fleets of fully autonomous aircraft could be used in the future to monitor bush areas for rapid detection of fire spots to reduce the firefighters’ response time.  The same aircraft could be used for personnel support by incorporating various sensors, communication capabilities and human interfaces for streaming information to improve situational awareness.

“Water-bombing helicopters could also be unmanned. These vehicles operate in low visibility, high winds, and with high chances of getting the buckets entangled in power lines. By removing the pilot we remove most of the risk.”

A/Prof Perez said to integrate IAVs in spaces shared with piloted vehicles, progress was needed along four fronts: technology, regulation and certification, economics, and public acceptance.

“Although there have been great technological developments in IAVs such as unmanned aircraft, there are still areas that require further development, including ‘sense and avoid’ for obstacles and other vehicles, human factors for better human-machine communication, robust communication links, and emergency-handling situations where the vehicle health is compromised.

“When it comes to regulation and certification, a key question is how do we assess the quality of decision-making as the level of autonomy in the vehicles increase? Today, unmanned vehicle operations use only remotely piloted vehicles. As the level of autonomy increases, there is a need for new risk management frameworks and regulation that could handle higher levels of autonomy.

A/Prof Perez said the cost of unmanned vehicles was still inhibiting.

“One way to reduce the cost is to use multiple cheaper vehicles and share resources but this brings significant challenges in terms of safety, regulation, and certification.”

A/Prof Perez and his team at the University of Newcastle are working in collaboration with Boeing Research and Technology Australia and RMIT University to create a new framework for assessments of autonomy that could enable the future certification of fully autonomous vehicle operations.

“We are also working in collaboration with Boeing and the University of Queensland in the development of novel robust navigation systems that could respond to GPS attacks.

“As we work hard in developing some of the enabling factors of this technology, we can’t wait for the future of firefighting operations where humans and machines cooperate to minimize hazards. New technology is upon us but with it comes new challenges, and we are onto them.”

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Learn more about studying engineering at the University of Newcastle and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about engineering programs and about how you can study in Australia.