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Articles categorized as ‘Monash University Engineering School’

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

Monash University secures highest funding of $47.9m in research grants

Monash University has been awarded $47.9 million in the latest round of Australian Research Council (ARC) funding, the highest amount awarded to any university.

Monash achieved the highest funding for 18 ARC Future Fellowships of $13 million, and for five Linkage, Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities (LIEF) projects for which it was awarded $3.4 million.

Monash University secures highest funding of $47.9m in ARC grants

Study science and engineering at Monash University!

In addition, Monash achieved $7.5 million for 21 Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards (DECRA) and $24 million for 62 Discovery Projects.

The ARC funding will support a diverse range of research projects from enhancing a state-of-the-art microscope facility to analyse the atomic level structure of the natural world and advanced materials; understanding the role of mitochondria—the power generators of cells—in evolutionary adaptation; to developing a satellite that can measure moisture levels in soil more deeply than previously possible.

Announced by the Minister for Education and Training, Senator the Hon. Simon Birmingham, Monash was awarded funding by the ARC for work on 106 Projects across eight faculties and the Monash Indigenous Centre.

Monash University Vice-Provost (Research) Professor Pauline Nestor said Monash had achieved an outstanding result in the ARC grants, and it reflected the university’s high impact research work.

“These awards reflect the extremely high calibre of our research staff who are leading the way in delivering high impact outcomes to address the challenges facing the planet and impacting people’s quality of life,” Professor Nestor said.

Professor Joanne Etheridge, Director of the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy and Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, led one of the largest Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities (LIEF) awards for Australia this year. Professor Etheridge’s $1.8 million grant will deliver a revolutionary microscope to analyse the structure matter at the atomic level, building upon the outstanding research capability of the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy.

Professor Jeffrey Walker from the Monash Faculty of Engineering receives the largest Discovery Projects grant given to a Monash researcher this year of $923,500. Professor Walker’s five-year project will develop a new satellite that can remotely measure soil moisture to deeper levels than previously possible, giving farmers the data needed to optimise their available water resources and maximise food production.

Dr Damian Dowling from the Monash Faculty of Science was awarded an $805,008 ARC Future Fellowship. His project aims to discover if the genetic variation in mitochondria—the power generator of cells—contributes to evolutionary adaptation, and could reveal the role of mitochondria in adaptation to climatic stress.

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Want to learn more about engineering and science programs available at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

Global rankings confirm Monash as leader in engineering and technology

Monash University has been named Australia’s leading university in engineering and technology by an authoritative global rankings institution.

The Times Higher Education world university subject rankings 2016/17 announced has placed Monash 45th across the globe for engineering and technology—the highest ranking of any Australian university. Monash’s 45th ranking was eight places up on its rating for engineering and technology in last year’s rankings.

Global subject rankings confirm Monash as leader in engineering and technology

Monash is #1 in Australia for engineering and technology!

Monash’s high ranking in engineering and technology was underpinned by strong outcomes in teaching, international outlook, research, citations and industry income.

Further, Monash was ranked 41st in the world by Times Higher Education in clinical, pre-clinical and health and 63rd in business and economics. A total of 980 universities were included in the rankings.

President and Vice Chancellor of Monash University Professor Margaret Gardner AO said the results were further evidence of the university’s growing international reputation for outstanding research.

“Monash offers students the opportunity to study at a world-class university that produces research with global impact, collaborates with industry to drive innovation and attracts and retains the highest calibre of research and teaching staff,” Professor Gardner said.

“It’s wonderful to see the quality of our academics recognised. I particularly congratulate Monash staff in the fields of Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health, Engineering and Technology, Business and Economics and the Physical Sciences, all of which ranked among the top 100 this year.”

The Times Higher Education subject rankings follow the recent release of a number of global university rankings, each of which placed Monash in the top 100 universities in the world.

These rankings saw Monash placed 65th in the QS World University Rankings and 74th in the Times Higher Education rankings and 79th in the Academic Ranking of World Universities. Monash was also placed 32nd in the Reuters Top 75: Asia’s Most Innovative Universities.

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Find out more about studying engineering at Monash. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world

Monash University has ranked 41 in the world in Civil Engineering, and placed in the top 100 and 200 universities across five further categories, according to the latest Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU).

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world (Photo credit: Monash University)

Monash ranked in the top 100 universities for Chemical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Materials Engineering, and placed in the top 200 for Energy Science Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

Monash Provost and Senior Vice-President Professor Edwina Cornish commended staff and graduates on the latest world rankings.

“This outstanding result is a reflection of Monash Engineering’s world leading research which is focused on bringing real benefits to Australia into the future.”

ARWU ranks more than 1200 tertiary institutions each year and the best 500 are published.

Monash Engineering School

Did you know that Monash Engineering School offers the widest choice of engineering courses than any other Australian university?

Monash Engineering School offers a Master of Advanced Engineering, which commenced in 2015. Delivered at the Clayton campus, the Master of Advanced Engineering offers flexibility to complete your master degree in just one or two years depending on your previous study and work experience.

Specialisation options

  1. Chemical engineering
  2. Civil engineering (Water)
  3. Civil engineering (Transport)
  4. Civil engineering (Infrastructure Systems)
  5. Electrical engineering
  6. Energy and Sustainability (Malaysia campus only)
  7. Materials engineering
  8. Mechanical engineering

Apply to Monash Engineering School!

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Learn more about engineering degrees at Monash. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Materials Science and Engineering at Monash University

The ability to understand and manipulate materials and their properties is a key factor in any industrial process or technology, new or old. Increasingly nanotechnology, sustainable materials and biomaterials are becoming important areas of endeavor. Because of the enabling aspect of Materials Science and Engineering, and the multidisciplinary nature of the skills learned, Monash Engineering School graduates are much in demand in many industrial organisations. Many also go into research, be it in academia, industrial laboratories or government research organisations.

Materials engineers make a unique contribution to the design of new devices, products or components, and they make existing ones work better by improving or altering the properties of the materials involved.

Materials engineers also work as metallurgists, plastics engineers, ceramists, adhesive scientists, process and quality control engineers and corrosion or fracture engineers. They work in a range of industrial activities, including manufacturing, processing and recycling, and select and design materials for

  • aerospace vehicles;
  • ground transportation systems;
  • automotive industry;
  • solar energy and battery devices;
  • biomedical implants and opthalmic devices;
  • tissue engineering and drug delivery;
  • information and communication systems;
  • electronic and magnetic devices; and
  • optical and opto-electronic components.

The ability to actually engineer, or create, materials to meet specific needs is only just being realised. Improved processing and characterisation equipment such as the Australian synchrotron, mean the possibilities are endless, and key to almost all advances in aspects of manufacturing and engineering.

Careers in materials science and engineering

The expertise of materials engineers is required in many areas:

  • Conservation of energy and recycling
  • New biomaterials to image disease and heal the body
  • Novel electro-optic polymers that allow greater amounts of information storage
  • Lightweight metal alloys in cars to conserve energy
  • New magnetic materials
  • Materials for energy storage such as fuel cells
  • Functional materials made on the nano scale to reduce costly corrosion

The result for materials engineering graduates is overwhelmingly positive as unprecedented job opportunities continue to outstrip supply.

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Want to learn more about materials engineering programs at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

Monash Motorsport is Australasian champions for seventh consecutive year

The Monash Motorsport team has blitzed the field again at the annual Formula SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) Australasian event. Overall winners for a record seven years in a row, the Monash University crew defeated 29 other teams from around Australia, New Zealand, India and Japan.

The team scored 894.6 points out of a possible 1000, achieving the highest overall score and top-scoring in the Design and Autocross events.

Monash University Engineering School

Monash Motorsport team (Photo credit: Monash University)

According to team leader Areeb Hassan, the competition was tight.

“Some of the other teams had really strong entries this year, but we’re thrilled with the performance of our team and our vehicle,” Ms Hassan said.

Ms Hassan was especially pleased, given that the car was a completely new and very ambitious design this year.

“It was fantastic to have all our hard work recognised with a perfect score of 150 for Design, and to finish as overall winners,” she said.

The 2015 Monash Motorsport team was made up of 75 students from Monash University who were responsible for all elements of the the design, construction, management and racing of their open-wheel, formula style race car.

The team’s supervisor, Dr Scott Wordley, said that the team had performed extremely well under pressure.

“It wasn’t easy for them, getting the new car across the line, but all their hard work has really paid off. It’s a terrific result,” Dr Wordley said.

The Australasian Formula SAE event, part of the world’s largest university engineering design competition, was held at Calder Park Raceway from Dec. 10 – 13.

The Monash Motorsport team is now making plans for next year, when it hopes to visit Europe to compete in equivalent events at Silverstone in the UK and Hockenheimring in Germany. These Formula Student races are the most competitive in the world, with more than 100 entries from as many as 25 different countries.

Many of the team’s current students will be moving on to internships and graduate positions at top companies, including Rolls Royce Aero Engines, Audi Sport LMP, Ford Australia, Bosch Motorsport and various V8 Supercar teams.

Monash Motorsport

Monash Motorsport is a student run racing team that represents Monash University locally and internationally in the Formula SAE competition. Each year the team, comprising of students mainly from the Engineering, Information Technology and Business and Economics faculties, designs, builds and races a formula style race car against other teams from around the world.

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Would you like more information about engineering at Monash University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Monday, December 7th, 2015

Monash engineering researchers co-discover ultralight magnesium alloy

Professor Nick Birbilis, Head of Materials Science and Engineering Department at Monash Engineering School, said that the new magnesium-lithium alloy weighs about half as much as already lightweight aluminum, and could potentially be used across a broad range of manufacturing to reduce the weight of motor vehicles and other items such as laptops by up to 40 per cent.

Monash Engineering School

Dr Nick Birbilis (Photo credit: Monash University)

Professor Birbilis, who is part of a research team that includes Professor Michael Ferry and key researcher Dr Wanqiang Xu from University of New South Wales, came across the discovery by chance when they noticed that a piece of the magnesium alloy had been resting in a beaker of water for quite some time without corroding.

“Normally for magnesium alloys, you walk away and a day later you come back and there’s very little left. This particular alloy stunned everyone in that it looked pristine after very lengthy periods of exposure in saltwater conditions,” he said.

The findings, published in the current edition of Nature Materials, describe how the alloy forms a protective layer of carbonate-rich film upon atmospheric exposure, making it immune to corrosion when tested in laboratory settings.

Even when scratched, the metal is able to reform a protective surface film, making it similar to stainless steel, but at a fraction of the weight. In fact, this magnesium alloy could be the world’s lightest and strongest metal.

This discovery is particularly relevant to the transport industry, where a reduction in the weight of cars, trucks and airoplanes could improve fuel efficiency and greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

“These panels will make many vehicles and consumer products much lighter and, eventually, just as durable as today’s corrosion-resistant materials, another example of how advanced manufacturing is unlocking the potential of materials that have been under investigation—in too narrow a manner—for centuries,” said Professor Birbilis.

The international team working on this project including researchers from Monash University and UNSW, Nanjing University of Technology and Chinese aluminum-production giant, CHALCO, also used facilities at the Australian Synchrotron to study the molecular composition of the alloy and carbonate-rich film.

Prof Birbilis said they hope to better understand how the corrosion process is averted and are working toward imparting the ‘stainless’ effect to a wider range of alloys. This is being further assisted by an ARC Discovery Project awarded this year.

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

The ability to understand and manipulate materials and their properties is a key factor in any industrial process or technology, new or old. Increasingly nanotechnology, sustainable materials and biomaterials are becoming important areas of endeavor. Because of the enabling aspect of Materials Science and Engineering, and the multidisciplinary nature of the skills learned, Monash Engineering graduates are much in demand in many industrial organisations. Many also go into research, be it in academia, industrial laboratories or government research organisations.

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Want to learn more about Monash Engineering School? Contact OzTREKK’ s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

Monash helps work on next generation of electronics

A world of transparent, printable, more flexible and cheaper everyday electronics is a step closer after researchers from Monash University and the Australian Synchrotron helped produce the most effective and highest frequency organic transistor in the world.

The new approach to printing large-scale semiconductor sheets using the groundbreaking polymer P(NDI20D-T2), revealed in Nature Communications by Italian researchers from the Center for Nano Science and Technology in Milan, could hasten the development of subtle electronic products such as ID badges woven into clothing, translucent solar panels on windows and virtually invisible electronic sensors and monitors.

Monash Engineering School

Study engineering at Monash (Photo credit: Monash University)

Associate Professor Chris McNeill, from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Monash University, said the discovery that molecules in the polymer must be precisely aligned informed the new bar-coating technique.

“Many research teams have attempted roll-out printing of the polymer into sheets, much like a mound of dough is rolled flat by a rolling pin, but this has led to lackluster transistor performance,” Associate Professor McNeill said.

“Tightly wrapping a wire around the ‘rolling pin’ bar creates a coat of microscopic grooves 50 microns wide—one twentieth of a millimetre—forcing the molecules of the polymer into an organised pattern during printing, for much greater conductivity.”

Associate Professor McNeill said researchers from Monash University and the Australian Synchrotron provided crucial molecular analysis as the technique was developed.

“Working at the Synchrotron’s Soft X-ray Spectroscopy (SXR) beamline we defined the optimal molecular structure of the polymer, enabling our Italian research partners to print an organic transistor that is not only eight times larger than any predecessor, but boasts a commercially competitive frequency of 3.3 megahertz,” Associate Professor McNeill said.

“We believe the upscaling of organic transistors will enable faster development of next-generation electronics that are pliable, malleable and more affordable, beyond the limitations of bulky silicon-based transistors.”

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Find out more about engineering degrees at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, August 7th, 2015

Monash University’s energy technology miniaturisation

The prospects of your smartphone not needing a recharge before the day’s end are one step closer following recently published research from Monash University on supercapacitor miniaturisation.

Monash University Engineering School

Associate Professor Mainak Majumder (Photo credit: Monash University)

The collaboration between Monash’s Nanoscale Engineering Laboratory and their industry partner, Ionic Industries, addresses several important performance limitations of current batteries. The miniaturisation of supercapacitors will enable devices to hold much more energy in the same or lesser volume, have higher peak power, be fully recharged in minutes and last much longer than current battery technologies.

The market for supercapacitors (estimated at US$5bn with 20 per cent growth per annum) is predominantly in consumer electronics but with increasing applications in transport, construction, medicine, food, defence and other sectors meaning that this groundbreaking research has the potential to transform markets across a broad range of applications.

Associate Professor Mainak Majumder of Monash University’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Laboratory linked the research to Moore’s law:

“Fifty years ago, Moore wrote that every two years transistor density in circuits would double. Today we see a world ever more reliant on electronics shrinking in size and increasing in power.

“Traditionally, supercapacitor efficiency was limited by the large distance ions have to travel between sheets of porous carbon. By using microtechnology we have placed the positive and negative electrodes in one plane separated by a much smaller distance. Here we have shown that when the size of the electrodes becomes smaller, the amount of energy and power these supercapacitors can deliver per unit volume becomes exceedingly large,” Professor Majumder said.

Dr Parama Chakraborty-Banerjee, the lead electrochemist behind the studies said, “The unprecedented performance of these micro-supercapacitors has strengthened our theoretical understanding and comprehensively proved that miniaturisation of supercapacitors whereby edge effects are maximised represents the most promising evolution of this technology.”

Mr. Derrek Lobo, the graduate student who fabricated the devices added, “We are able to fabricate supercapacitors smaller than the diameter of human hair, with exceptionally high energy and power densities. We undertook relentless experiments for over two years in the face of doubts raised by established groups.”

The Monash research, published in Advanced Energy Materials (Impact Factor 16), was made possible by an ARC Linkage grant allowing Monash to work with Ionic Industries in paving the way for Australian ‘smart manufacturing’ and intellectual property utilising graphene—hailed as a “wonder material” with extraordinary properties. Ionic Industries is a spin-off from Strategic Energy Resources (ASX: SER).

“This vindicates our decision to back Monash on this exciting research and our confidence that the research will have real-world commercial applications,” said Ionic Industries CEO Mark Muzzin. “We are now planning to accelerate our efforts to produce prototype devices for demonstrating this technology.”

About the Monash Nanoscale Engineering Laboratory

The laboratory is dedicated to the science and technology at the nanoscale, and invoke the principles of materials chemistry, electrochemistry, colloidal science, micro- and nano-fabrication to develop innovative solutions to some of the problems facing the humanity. More specifically, they are interested in rational design and engineering of materials at the nanoscale—often borrowing from highly evolved functioning biological structures—to impact technologies involved in fluidics, solar energy conversion, water purification, and drug-delivery. At the same time, the lab seeks to understand fundamental issues related to molecular transport phenomena in the confines of nanoscale or during the assembly of nanomaterials into useful structures, typically at the macroscale.

The aim of this laboratory is to train scientists with a wide-array of skill-sets as well as infuse critical thinking so that they can tackle fundamental scientific and technological problems which transcend the traditional boundaries of disciplines.
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Would you like more information about studying engineering at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, July 20th, 2015

New pathway for Monash engineering students

Achieving engineering Chartered status is now within reach for masters students, following an agreement forged recently between Monash University and professional association Engineers Australia.

Monash University Engineering School

Find out how you can study at Monash University

The new agreement will give students another pathway to climb engineering’s professional apex and accelerate their careers thanks to a new streamlined certification process. The agreement will see Monash become the first university to achieve this level of certification with the new Monash Master of Advanced Engineering program.

The Monash Masters degree is the only one within Australia designed for alignment with Engineers Australia Stage 2 Competency Standards.

Engineers Australia certifies that the Monash University Master of Advanced Engineering provides accelerated progress for students towards the attainment of Chartered status. The knowledge acquired from the Masters degree for each specialisation aligns with the requirements of many of the Chartered competencies when coupled with relevant industrial experience.

Chartered status is an internationally recognised benchmark for professional aptitude among engineers that recognises an engineer practices in a competent, independent and ethical manner.

Professor Frieder Seible, Dean of Monash University’s Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of IT, said a chartered engineer’s strong leadership skills and expertise boosted potential earning power, job opportunities and promotions within their branch of engineering.

“Students with certification are on track to receive an internationally recognised badge of competence that is benchmarked and transferable with standards applicable in other parts of the world,” Professor Seible said.

“Chartered engineers are recognised by the community, industry and governments as a professional and responsible contributor to the well-being of Australian society.”

Engineers Australia CEO Stephen Durkin said the new program would “develop transformational, global and socially responsible leaders in the engineering profession. We are proud to be working with Monash University, an institution recognised as a world leader in engineering education and research.

“The high quality knowledge and skills developed through the new Master of Advanced Engineering program at Monash University directly supports a path to international recognition via Chartered status.”

Master of Advanced Engineering at Monash Engineering School

Did you know that Monash Engineering School offers the widest choice of engineering courses than any other Australian university?

Monash Engineering School is offering a new Master of Advanced Engineering, which commenced in 2015.

Delivered at the Clayton campus, the Master of Advanced Engineering is a one-year qualification. The course is designed to extend your knowledge in your specialisation area and advance your leadership and complex-problem-solving skills.

Specialisation options

  1. Chemical engineering
  2. Civil engineering (Water)
  3. Civil engineering (Transport)
  4. Electrical engineering
  5. Materials engineering
  6. Mechanical engineering

Structures and Geotechnical specialisations planned to commence in 2016.

Entry requirements

To apply for the Master of Advanced Engineering, you must have the equivalent of a four-year Australian Bachelor of Engineering in the relevant discipline with a minimum 70% average.

Apply to the Monash Engineering School!

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Learn more about the Master of Advanced Engineering and other engineering degrees at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Monash Engineering’s chipless tracker could transform barcode industry

Barcodes on packaged goods could soon be a thing of the past with the rapid expansion of chipless tags, and Monash University researchers are at the forefront of developing this technology.

Monash University Engineering School

Barcodes on packaged goods could soon be a thing of the past

A research team lead by Dr Nemai Karmakar, from the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, have long been developing chipless radio frequency identification (RFID) tags that can be printed directly onto products and packaging—including postal items, drugs and books—making it cheaper, smaller and faster than any other tracking system on the market.

Now, the team have developed fully printable tags for metals and liquids including water bottles and soft-drinks cans. Until now, this hasn’t been possible because the metal and liquids interfere with the technology. The tag can be printed with an inkjet printer and can be read when they are attached to reflective surfaces such as metal cans and water bottles.

Dr Karmakar said the team was believed to be the first to develop fully printable chipless RFID tags on paper and plastics, and the technology could revolutionise the multi-billion-dollar RFID market.

“The fact that chipless tags be printed directly onto products and packaging means they are far more reliable, smaller and cost effective than any other barcoding system,” Dr Karmakar said.

“The new chipless RFID technology is a high data capacity mm-wave barcode system that operates at 60 GHz mm-wave signal. This means it is much smaller than any other commercially available chipless RFID tags; however, it can still contain a high amount of data and information.

“The main challenge that we have overcome is to transfer the technology to paper and plastic while retaining the required printing resolution. Uniquely, the 60 GHz mm-wave tag can handle printing errors and surface variations. It’s very promising indeed in its ability to revolutionise the multi-billion-dollar RFID market.”

Dr Karmakar said the chipless RFID tag could also be used in temperature above 80 degrees and cryogenic temperatures.

“Another application could be biomedical samples stored at cryogenic temperatures,” Dr Karmakar said.

The researchers, based in the Monash Microwave, Antenna, RFID and Sensor Laboratory (MMARS) recently received a US$90,000 grant over three years from Xerox to further develop the cutting edge 60 GHz Chipless RFID.

The research has been supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery and Linkage Projects.

Monash University Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering (ECSE) is an extremely diverse department specialising in telecommunications, RFID, biomedical engineering, robotics, sensing, vision, systems-on-a-chip and smart energy systems. These applications are based on fundamental research in electronics, photonics, signal processing, communications theory, artificial intelligence, real-time software, optimization, electromagnetics and numerical modeling.

The ECSE program at Monash University equips students with the skills necessary to succeed in this rapidly changing industry, with graduates going on to make an impact in many areas. The department is at the centre of ECSE research, with Monash researchers working on innovative projects including bionic vision, augmented reality, medical diagnostics, optical communications, wireless communications, sensor systems and high-voltage engineering. This research is creating and supporting high-tech industry.

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Would you like to learn more about engineering programs at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.