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Articles categorized as ‘Griffith University Engineering School’

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Employment initiatives boost student experience and graduate outcomes at Griffith University

A new range of career-focused initiatives will give Griffith University graduates a sharp competitive edge to improve their job prospects.

Griffith aims to include real-life industry experiences in all its degrees and programs.

Its students also have access to an e-mentoring program, a high-quality ePortfolio platform. Griffith is the first Australian university to operate a franchise of Unitemps—a recruitment service providing paid work opportunities for students.

These employability enhancing services have proved invaluable for recent mechanical engineering graduate Sebastian Speak, who has been employed full-time by Scout Aerial to design a drone launcher for an anti-poaching device, which will be used in Africa.

“I designed one launcher as part of a twelve-week internship and now I’m making thirty ready to be used in Africa to specifically target the illegal poaching of rhinoceros and elephants,” he said.

“I moved to Australia to specifically study at Griffith because I had heard it focused on preparing you for working in industry and I couldn’t be happier with my outcome.”

Griffith University Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) Professor Debra Henly said this year approximately 22,500 students were enrolled in courses that facilitate internships, work experience or work placements within industry professionals locally, nationally and globally.

She says there are almost 400 subject areas with a specific industry placement course option and that the University also assists with work experience and job placements outside of specific courses.

“Students across all study areas at Griffith will experience a range of opportunities to build their professional identity and career readiness throughout their degree,” she said.

“We are also moving to three 12-week trimesters in 2017, which will allow students greater flexibility to balance work and study, or to accelerate their study in some degrees.”

Griffith School of Education and Professional Studies academics Professor Glenn Finger and Dr Paula Jervis-Tracey recently published research about internships in the education industry in a book titled Teacher Education: Innovation, Intervention and Impact.

This quality research reinforces Griffith’s position as a leading university for graduate success and graduate employability, and is based on Griffith’s Employability Framework.

Professor Finger says internships are designed to inspire students to achieve their dream career: “Strengthening the connection between university and industry is the key to the success of internships,” Professor Finger said.

Griffith’s work with education internships has seen approximately 90 per cent of our graduates working in schools in Queensland.

Griffith’s key employability initiatives

Employment initiatives and graduate outcomes at Griffith University

Learn more about Griffith Uni!

Industry experiences – Griffith University has internship opportunities in every study group. It also offers up to 250 exclusive internships with the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games organising body (GOLDOC) through our official partnership.  Students completing internships with GOLDOC have the unique opportunity to earn 40 credit points, allowing them to fully immerse themselves in the organisation and apply their knowledge throughout their placement. Each year hundreds of students also travel overseas to enhance their degrees through global learning experiences, which are available in 48 countries.

Griffith Unitemps is the first Australian franchise of Unitemps, a UK-based student employment service providing paid work opportunities for students on campus and in South East Queensland businesses while they study.  It offers a broad range of general and degree-related vacancies aimed at improving employability before and after graduation.

Mentoring – Griffith Global eMentoring focuses on global engagement. It aims to support career development learning, global citizenship and graduate outcomes for Griffith students by connecting them to industry professionals beyond Australia’s borders. GGEM mentors not only assist Griffith students to gain a deeper understanding of their disciplines, they connect them to a world of opportunity. Griffith also runs the Industry Mentoring Program, and Griffith Business School is piloting eCareerCoaching.

Supported ePortfolio platform – Employers are increasingly looking for quality online portfolios when hiring, and ePortfolios allow students to document their professional and academic development as their studies progress. All Griffith students have access to build a high quality ePortfolio during their degree.

Professional profiling on LinkedIn – Students are encouraged to build and optimise their LinkedIn profile and enhance their employability prospects by connecting with industry professionals, employers and alumni. Griffith’s LinkedIn eModule provides expert guidance on developing an exceptional professional profile, including selecting the right photo and addressing the headline, summary, experiences and more.

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Discover more about your study options at Griffith University!

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Griffith design student’s 3D-printed guitars hit a sweet note

A Griffith University design student has produced the first two 3D-printed guitars on the Gold Coast.

The guitars were engineered with the skill, passion and commitment of third-year industrial design student Adrian McCormack under the direction of Associate Professor Dr Jennifer Loy at the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University.

Griffith student's 3D-printed guitars hit a sweet note

Griffith design student Adrian McCormack shows off his 3D-printed guitars (Photo credit: Griffith University)

The bespoke guitars highlight the limitless possibilities of 3D-printing technology and had their first public outing at the Blues on Broadbeach Festival recently.

The first design was brought to reality with help from Brisbane guitar builder and technician Rohan Staples at the renowned Guitar Shop in Paddington and printed at Griffith’s Gold Coast campus in seven components, while the second was printed in one complete piece by Belgian company Materialise.

Adrian says his wave design was inspired by the Gold Coast’s rich surfing culture, and explains he spent plenty of time studying the playing style and technique of blues guitarists.

“It was clear that arm support within the design was vital along with overall strength and of course, aesthetics,” he says.

“For the model printed overseas we used a bio-compatible and food-safe material called polyamide, which also ensured the body weight stayed roughly the same as a generic Telecaster body.

“For the locally printed guitar, once the model pieces had been tested and prototyped, they were printed over the course of eight days on campus, with around 200 hours of printing.

“This guitar print also featured a unique process called ‘hot swapping,’ which created the unique red and white finish,” he says.

The locally printed guitar will stay on campus, finding a home at the Griffith Red Zone, while the second guitar will be offered as a prize for a Festival-goer to be announced later this month and presented at Griffith’s Open Day on July 24.

According to Associate Professor Loy, Griffith is working hard to develop graduates who have specialised skills in this area.

“Our industrial design and 3D design digital media students are learning world leading software for additive manufacturing, and gaining hands-on experience of designing with advanced digital technologies, including 3D Printing, scanning and electronics for new design applications.

“3D printing is not just an add-on technology within the digital landscape—it has matured and now completely changes what is possible.

“We envisage that the students of today will have the jobs of the future, ones that may not even exist yet, but that are clearly on the way, with 3D printing alone being forecast as a 7-billion-dollar-a-year sector by 2020.”

About the Bachelor of Industrial Design

In this degree, students will combine a creative engineering approach with industrial design innovation and will graduate with a unique ability for innovation and creativity in Industrial Design while working within the principles of engineering. Students learn through project-based design studios and technical learning studios and learning through making, as the degree takes a hands-on approach to teaching that uses advanced technologies such as 3D printing, while also experiencing traditional engineering learning.

Bachelor of Industrial Design students will learn about design process, material characteristics, mechanics and electronics as well as 3D computer modelling, creative thinking and digital media. This degree also incorporates an international focus on digital and advanced technology manufacturing, giving you the chance to develop an understanding of how a product is created, from design to delivery, in a global context now and in the emerging advanced manufacturing environment.

Program: Bachelor of Industrial Design
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University!

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Discover more about studying industrial design and engineering at Griffith. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Minister joins call for more women in science, tech, engineering and maths

In the lead-up to International Women’s Day (March 8, 2016) the Hon Karen Andrews MP, Assistant Minister for Science, visited young engineering students on Griffith University’s Gold Coast campus on Friday, March 4, 2016.

Assistant Minister Andrews, herself a qualified engineer, is a strong advocate for making science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) a priority in schools and in particular for girls to study these subjects through to university.

Griffith Engineering School

Hon Karen Andrews MP, Assistant Minister for Science visits first-year engineering students at Griffith’s Gold Coast campus (Photo credit: Griffith University)

“Tackling the gender imbalance in STEM is a key focus for the government in its National Innovation and Science Agenda. There’s $48 million to inspire STEM literacy under the agenda and we’re investing an additional $13 million to inspire girls and women to take up STEM education and careers,” said Mrs Andrews.

“This will be done by highlighting female leaders and building programs and networks to support workplace gender equality and advance women in STEM.”

Pro Vice Chancellor of Griffith Sciences Professor Debra Henly said she was delighted to have the Minister’s support in calling for more women to take up careers in STEM.

“The future of work is in STEM. The National Innovation and Science Agenda will drive a new boom to generate jobs and prosperity for all and we need more women to do that.

Griffith University is committed to producing high calibre STEM graduates and we begin that process with our Science on the Go team which works very closely with high schools across the southeast Queensland encouraging more students, particularly girls, to study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses.”

“At Griffith University, we also work closely with our industry partners so that our students are working on real-life projects from the word go and they have the necessary skills and experience to take advantage of the range of jobs that are evolving.”

Professor Henly is one of only a handful of women who head a science, engineering and information technology faculty in Australia.

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Learn more about studying science, engineering, and information technology at Griffith University! Contact OzTREKK’s Admission Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

Portable unit to aid desalination energy project

Griffith University’s Dr Fernanda Helfer is capitalising on a major national award to further her research into the viability of a renewable energy derived from the desalination process.

Griffith Engineering School

Dr Fernanda Helfer, from Griffith’s School of Engineering (Photo credit: Griffith University)

Dr Helfer, from the Griffith School of Engineering, is the recipient of a $47,000 AMP Foundation Tomorrow Maker Award and has joined Queensland University of Technology’s Professor Graeme Millar to lead a project studying the potential of pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) in Australia.

PRO technology comprises a semi-permeable membrane that separates water flows with different salt contents. Through osmosis, the less concentration solution flows to the high concentration side to equalise the osmotic pressure on both sides.

This creates a solution that, once depressurised via a turbine, produces a renewable electrical energy.

PRO-assisted desalination is considered a promising alternative for the desalination industry worldwide, reducing dependence on fossil fuels and allowing minimisation of environmental impacts caused by the discharge of concentrated brine into the sea.

Dr Helfer and Professor Millar plan to build a portable laboratory unit integrating PRO with reverse osmosis (RO) desalination. It will be available for ongoing experiments and analysis.

“We are currently working on a joint research paper featuring several scenarios around the application of PRO-generated power in Australia,” says Dr Helfer.

“We are meeting in March to discuss the design and suppliers of components for the portable PRO unit. Hopefully, it will be built and operational by later this year.”

An important aspect of the project will be a study into the efficacy of using wastewater effluent and brine from desalination plants as a source of energy.

While scientists agree that technical and economic improvements are required to ensure the commercial viability and credibility of PRO membrane technology, Dr Helfer believes this new research will confirm its potential, particularly regarding environmental benefits.

“There is potential for this technology to be used in the mining industry, as it produces a lot of high salinity water which makes it problematic for beneficial use,” she says.

“The PRO process can be used to dilute this water and minimise the impact on the environment when it is disposed.

“PRO is also a potential source of energy for remote and island communities where freshwater is at a premium.”

Last year Dr Helfer co-authored a paper that identified Australia as ideal for the construction of PRO plants linked to desalination plants.

Griffith Postgraduate Engineering Scholarships

For: High-performing international students applying for engineering postgraduate coursework studies at Griffith University
Available to: Commencing postgraduate coursework engineering students in Semester 2, 2016.
Level of study: Postgraduate
Citizenship: Citizen of a country other than Australia or New Zealand
Award value and benefits: Up to $6,000 in total for two-year postgraduate coursework engineering programs (four tuition payments of $1,500 over four semesters). Up to $4,500 in total for one-and-half-year postgraduate coursework engineering programs (three tuition payments of $1,500 over three semesters). GPA conditions apply.
Programs of study: All engineering postgraduate coursework programs (excluding online, non-award, offshore delivery)

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Find out more about the Griffith School of Engineering and about Griffith Postgraduate Engineering Scholarships. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, November 2nd, 2015

Griffith Postgraduate Engineering Scholarships

Griffith University engineering degrees are known for their innovation and practical relevance. Griffith offers a range of flexible and innovative degree programs allowing students to pursue their interest area. Industry professionals are involved in developing and delivering courses, ensuring that when you graduate, you’ll not only meet the requirements for professional registration in your chosen field, but also have the skills employers demand.

Griffith University School of Engineering

Study engineering at Griffith University

Griffith School of Engineering study areas

  • Civil, structural and geotechnical engineering
  • Electrical and electronic engineering
  • Environmental engineering
  • Mechanical engineering
  • Mechatronic engineering
  • Software engineering

Throughout your engineering studies you will have the opportunity to test out your skills against the world best through the numerous challenges and competitions. From the Warman competition to build an autonomous vehicle to cross over crevasses to the Formula SAE challenge to build and run a competitive out wheel formula-style race car you will have the opportunity to push the limits of your engineering and get yourself noticed by potential employers.

Griffith Postgraduate Engineering Scholarships

For: High-performing international students applying for engineering postgraduate coursework studies at Griffith University
Available to: Commencing postgraduate coursework engineering students in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, 2016.
Level of study: Postgraduate
Citizenship: Citizen of a country other than Australia or New Zealand
Award value and benefits: Up to $6,000 in total for two-year postgraduate coursework engineering programs (four tuition payments of $1,500 over four semesters). Up to $4,500 in total for one-and-half-year postgraduate coursework engineering programs (three tuition payments of $1,500 over three semesters). GPA conditions apply.
Programs of study: All engineering postgraduate coursework programs (excluding online, non-award, offshore delivery)

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Would you like more information about Griffith Postgraduate Engineering Scholarships and the Griffith School of Engineering? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

Gold Coast Science and Tech Festival launched at Griffith

National Science Week and Griffith University is a major contributor to a packed agenda celebrating the wonders of science and technology.

Griffith University Science degrees

Queensland Minister for Science and Innovation, The Honourable Ms Leeanne Enoch MP, at the launch of the Gold Coast Science and Tech Festival (Photo credit: Griffith University)

Griffith University hosted Queensland’s Minister for Science and Innovation, The Honourable Ms Leeanne Enoch MP, who launched the inaugural Gold Coast Science and Tech Festival. Guests joined Ms Enoch in Griffith’s Red Zone interactive learning facility on the Gold Coast campus.

Presented by Study Gold Coast, the Gold Coast Science and Tech Festival will run throughout National Science Week (August 15–23) and feature events across the city.

Ms Enoch said such initiatives were important because education, expertise and leadership in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) subjects–as well as aspects of the Arts to form a new acronym, STEAM–were needed to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing world.

“Massive change is already occurring across all we understand and as that continues we must be ready,” said the Minister. “STEM and STEAM skills form the crucial platform underlying the ongoing development of a knowledge and innovation-based economy and society, and South-East Queensland can be a leader in that pursuit.”

Griffith University Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor Professor Ned Pankhurst said Study Gold Coast was a fantastic initiative and during National Science Week would highlight those bringing key innovation into focus in the city.

Through Griffith Sciences, and in particular its Science on the GO! education outreach program, Griffith University will conduct events on the Gold Coast and in Brisbane.

The Science Trivia Challenge will be held at the Queensland Academy for Health Sciences in Southport on Tuesday, August 18, and the Calamvale Community College in Brisbane on Thursday, August 20.

With three groups—Years 5-6, Years 7-9, and Years 10-12 and Teachers—school teams face six rounds of eight questions. There are plenty of prizes on offer, as well as science demonstrations, audience questions and hands-on interactive science activities.

Also on Thursday, the future of 3D printing and its impact on industry will be the focus of The 3D Printing Revolution, a discussion led by Griffith’s Program Leader of Industrial Design, Associate Professor Jennifer Loy, and Head of Engineering, Professor Geoff Tansley.

Featuring displays, demonstrations and activities, the event will cover archaeology and antiquity, human body and movement, energy and transport, environment and nature, space and astronomy, innovation and technology.

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Find out more about studying science at Griffith University! Contact OzTREKK’s Admission Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Monday, August 17th, 2015

Quake effort affirms Griffith Engineering graduate’s choice

In 2014, Griffith University engineering graduate Alana Scott gained invaluable experience and insight as she contributed to the ongoing reconstruction effort following the 2011 Christchurch earthquake.

The disaster claimed the lives of 185 people and caused $20 billion in damage, including subsequent ground subsidence that changed floodplain behaviour and flood flowpaths.

Griffith Engineering graduate Alana Scott is now forging her career with top technical services firm Jacobs (Photo credit: Griffith University)

“This became most evident during 2014 flood events which affected many Christchurch homes not previously impacted by floodwaters,” says Alana, an environmental engineer with international technical services company, Jacobs.

“I was on secondment for the company in New Zealand and became part of the support team focusing on Christchurch’s Dudley Creek catchment. I assisted in establishing an understanding of the baseline flood risk. Then we undertook a preliminary investigation of options to reduce people’s flood risk.

“This involved modelling creek diversions, channel-widening schemes, stormwater pump stations and pipe upgrades, helping to narrow down mitigation possibilities to a few preferred options.”

Alana graduated  from Griffith with a degree in environmental engineering (Honours) in 2011 and joined engineering consultants Sinclair Knight Merz in 2012. The company was acquired by Jacobs in 2013.

Now based in Brisbane, her work involves consulting with Queensland local government authorities on water issues. This can mean flood and catchment modelling, flood risk assessment, mine water balance, erosion and sediment control, stormwater quality and effects, and analysis of needs and consequences arising from transport, industry and housing infrastructure.

It’s all an ideal fit for Alana. However, she may have taken an entirely different study-career path were it not for the influence of her mother and a former American Vice-President.

“I was in Year 12 when I saw Vice-President Al Gore’s film, An Inconvenient Truth,” says Alana. “The film really spoke to me about the precarious state of the environment and the need to encourage expertise and programs towards ensuring a truly sustainable future.

“About the same time, my mum attended a Careers Expo in Brisbane and came home raving about environmental engineering. On the strength of those two events, I enrolled at Griffith and determined to embrace all aspects of my engineering degree.”

As a member of the Griffith Honours College, Alana’s participation in volunteer projects and events such as model United Nations conferences took her to Cambodia, the Netherlands, Germany, Adelaide and Canberra.

She also spent three months in Japan in 2010, completing an Overseas Industrial Experience Program offered through the Griffith School of Engineering and based in Gifu University’s River Engineering Department.

When Alana joined Engineers Without Borders and completed a learning program in India, the experience confirmed the positive impact that good engineering can have on communities. This was repeated in Christchurch.

“The options we provided are being further refined and, when constructed, will undoubtedly bring positive impact to the people of Christchurch,” says Alana.

“In India and New Zealand, I saw the direct benefits of my projects on people’s lives and it’s why I continue to ask, as a person and an engineer: what can I offer communities?”

Environmental engineering at Griffith University

Environmental engineering is a pathway to helping sustain the natural environment and its resources in a modern society through engineering. The Griffith University environmental engineering degree was the first of its kind offered in Queensland, and has continued to evolve to offer an integrated approach to solve and manage environmental problems.

As a foundation, students will develop skills in the analysis and understanding of environmental issues and management together with the ability to deliver robust and practical solutions to problems. Griffith environmental engineering programs combine the strong technical base of a professional engineer with extensive environmental and sustainable knowledge embedded throughout each year.

Program: Master of Environmental Engineering
Location: Nathan Campus, Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years

Apply to Griffith University Engineering School!

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Find out more about the Griffith School of Engineering. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

Future engineers in construction site classroom

Griffith University’s future engineers have taken advantage of being located next door to one of the Gold Coast’s current major road construction projects and are using it as a ‘real world’ classroom.

Griffith University Engineering School

From left, Mr Adrian Penny (Parsons Brinckerhoff), Mr Darren Beckman (Seymour Whyte Constructions) and Associate Professor Rodney Stewart (Photo credit: Griffith University)

In the latest in a series of engagements between Griffith students and industry, engineers from GC Connect Joint Venture—a joint venture between Seymour Whyte Constructions and Parsons Brinckerhoff—presented a guest lecture about the Smith Street Motorway and Olsen Avenue Interchange Upgrade project.

Associate Professor Rodney Stewart, from the Griffith School of Engineering, said it was important for the university to capitalise on educational opportunities and maintain links with industry.

“With so much construction currently underway in the Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct, we have what is essentially a ‘live learning lab’ for civil engineering,” he said.

“Whether coming onto the campus or conducting site visits, industry representatives are not only sharing their expertise in areas such as construction techniques, design and construction management, site issues and project planning, they are enhancing students’ understanding of their degree and career prospects.

“Also, quite a few Griffith engineering graduates are coming back as presenters and our current students can readily relate to them and their example.”

Companies involved so far include Lend Lease (Gold Coast University Hospital), Abi Group (Griffith Business School), SMEC (M1 upgrade), Laing O’Rourke (Griffith Health Centre), Watpac (Gold Coast Private Hospital) and GC Connect Joint Venture.

Seymour Whyte Senior Project Engineer Mr Darren Beckman said he was impressed by the Griffith students’ knowledge and their keen observation of the construction currently underway in the precinct.

“The students had a strong interest in how the construction staging of the GC Connect JV project was planned and executed,” he said.

“It’s clear the students have been observing major construction activities around the precinct to see firsthand the types of opportunities that exist for them once they graduate.”

Parsons Brinckerhoff Civil Design Engineer, Mr Adrian Penny, said that as a Griffith University graduate he valued the opportunity to share his knowledge with current students.

Associate Professor Stewart said the student-industry engagement initiative complemented the strong practical component of Griffith’s 2104ENG Construction Engineering unit.

Griffith University – civil, structural and geotechnical engineering

As we face mounting environmental and infrastructure challenges, civil engineers of the future will have an enormous impact on our communities. Griffith Civil Engineering courses offer an innovative and creative engineering experience by equipping you with a basic foundation in science combined with an integrated knowledge of multiple engineering fields. The schools’ postgraduate engineering management major equip students with the managerial skills needed to run complex projects smoothly, a quality highly valued by employers.

Apply to the Griffith School of Engineering!

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Contact OzTREKK for more information about engineering programs offered at the Griffith School of Engineering. Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

Griffith School of Engineering studies energy storage

With rising electricity prices one of the biggest issues facing Australian households, Griffith University research into energy storage and supply holds the promise of cheaper, better quality power for the low voltage (LV) electricity distribution network.

According to the research from the Griffith School of Engineering and published in the journal Applied Energy, a forecast-based, three-phase battery energy storage scheduling and operation system provides benefits such as reduced peak demand, more efficient load balancing and better management of supply from solar photovoltaics (PV).

Griffith School of Engineering

Study engineering at the Griffith Nathan Campus

Researcher Mr Chris Bennett, working under the supervision of Associate Professor Rodney Stewart and Professor Jun Wei Lu, has developed and applied an intelligent scheduling system to a South-East Queensland-based LV distribution network servicing 128 residential customers.

“The low-voltage network is a typical suburb of a few hundred homes where there is a single area transformer. Recently there has been a substantial increase in the number of homes with installed residential solar PV in these settings,” says Mr Bennett.

“Daily peak demand in residential networks typically occurs in the evenings in summer and both late morning and evening in winter. But because solar PV generation is dependent on incoming solar radiation, peak generation occurs during the middle of the day, typically when demand in the residential distribution network is low.

“This means there is an incongruity between when energy is generated and when it is required, which can lead to power supply and quality issues; however, with a battery energy storage (BES) system comprising Lithium Ion battery banks coupled with smart power control systems, such as STATCOMS, and featuring embedded intelligent forecasting software, we can better manage the LV network.”

Foundation for a future smart grid

Associate Professor Stewart says the recent significant uptake of solar PV has in some locations created issues in the LV network, including surplus power being pushed up the grid, unbalanced phases and poor power quality.

“Our solution tackles these immediate issues while also setting the foundation for a future smart grid,” he says.

“The two main advantages of intelligent BES in the LV network are that we can mitigate power quality issues attributed to fluctuations in generation from renewable energy sources such as PV, and we can store surplus energy gathered during the middle of the day and distribute it when it is needed in the evening peak period.

“If such a system was implemented across an entire city it would reduce wholesale peak generation charges, alleviate costly upgrades to the grid, reduce the average time of outages and improve power quality for customers.”

Associate Professor Stewart and Mr Bennett agree that distributed energy resources and smart power control electronics can revolutionise the grid and reduce the price of electricity for customers.

Mr Bennett’s research was facilitated as part of a Queensland Government 2013-2015 Partnership Grant.

This has allowed collaboration between Griffith University and energy companies Elevare, Ergon Energy and Energex on projects to develop and apply world-leading smart-grid theory, technology and applications such as STATCOMs, energy storage systems and integrated solar PV.

 Griffith School of Engineering – Energy Engineering

Energy systems engineering brings together the skills and knowledge of electrical engineering to develop sustainable energy systems. The program is designed around lowering global dependence on non-renewable sources, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, creating energy efficient technologies and using alternative energy sources.

As about 90 per cent of our current energy sources come from non-renewable sources such as fossil fuels, the need to find alternate energy systems is crucial to preserve our environment.

  • Energy production
  • Materials
  • Tourism
  • Land management
  • Policy analysis

Apply to the Griffith School of Engineering!

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Would you like more information about the Griffith School of Engineering? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

Griffith engineering student building strong foundations in Mumbai

Traveling from the sheltered western world to Asia’s poorest slum, fourth-year Griffith Civil Engineering student Giovanni Rapana put down his iPhone, rolled up his sleeves and got to work. With the assistance of the Industry Affiliate Program and a Griffith University Scholarship, Giovanni completed a six-week project in the Shivaji Nagar slums of Mumbai, India.

Griffith Engineering School

Study engineering at Griffith University

Working with a research based urban development company, Giovanni participated in a project investigating the structure of the slum’s concrete foundations in an attempt to find low-cost alternatives that can better survive the harsh conditions. He gained new knowledge on construction techniques and the subsurface profiles of slum areas. The program offered Giovanni a fantastic opportunity to explore the world and his field.

The Industry Affiliate Program (IAP) is a work-integrated learning program that is tailored for placing undergraduate and postgraduate students into relevant industries. It provides students the opportunity to participate in real-world projects and develop the discipline-specific skills through industrial projects. The IAP is different from an internship or a summer job as it usually requires the students to work two to five days a week throughout a whole semester.

“The IAP project was definitely beneficial to me. Without this internship experience, I wouldn’t have realised that there is still so much more to learn. I know how to do assignments but applying those skills to the real world can be challenging,” said the Griffith Civil Engineering student.

Giovanni not only acquired academic advantages from the internship, but the whole experience of staying in India has added a fruitful page to his life story and was an exceptional experience.

“India was such a different atmosphere, such a different lifestyle… Seeing children who, instead of playing with phones are throwing rocks and sorting trash was challenging for me as I’m also a father… But, overall the whole experience was a blast. I even attended two Indian weddings which was the highlight of the trip and one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen.”

The IAP offers different projects to suit the students’ profession, and provides direct benefits and industry insight to the students through the practical placements.

Civil, structural and geotechnical engineering at Griffith University

As we face mounting environmental and infrastructure challenges, civil engineers of the future will have an enormous impact on our communities. Griffith Civil Engineering courses offer an innovative and creative engineering experience by equipping you with a basic foundation in science combined with an integrated knowledge of multiple engineering fields. The schools’ post-graduate engineering management major equip students with the managerial skills needed to run complex projects smoothly, a quality highly valued by employers.

Apply to the Griffith School of Engineering!

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Contact OzTREKK for more information about engineering programs offered at the Griffith School of Engineering. Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.