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Articles categorized as ‘Australian Engineering Schools’

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

Record number of women graduating from engineering at UQ

The University of Queensland is celebrating the graduation of a record number of female engineering students last semester with women making up 35 per cent of all graduates—more than double the national average of 17 per cent.

Record number of women graduating from engineering at UQ

UQ female engineering graduates exceeded the national average of 17 per cent (Image credit: UQ)

UQ’s engineering cohort has seen significant growth in female graduate numbers since 2012, when they numbered 21 per cent, and the national average was 15 per cent.

Faculty of  Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology, (EAIT) Executive Dean, Professor Simon Biggs said the increase in female graduates highlights UQ’s leadership in shaping a more inclusive and equitable engineering industry, bolstered by the very successful Women in Engineering (WE) program which has been running for four years.

“The Women in Engineering program was established at UQ as a university-led, industry-funded initiative to address the gender disparity in engineering at both the tertiary and industry levels, and the results so far speak volumes for the value of the program.” said Professor Biggs.

“UQ also recently hosted the first joint university workshop to collaborate and share best practice for recruiting females into engineering.

More than 30 representatives from 18 universities across Australia, New Zealand and the US state of Colorado attended the event with the long-term objective to see female participation in engineering increase collectively across Australia.

“We don’t just want to see gender diversity improve in engineering at UQ, we want to see broad change across the industry in Australia and globally.”

Women currently account for less than 13 per cent of the engineering workforce in Australia, and industries that employ engineers are missing out on the benefits that diversity brings to technically-grounded problem solving.

EAIT faculty is leading from the top with a record increase in female academic appointments in engineering in 2016, especially in the area of chemical engineering. A popular area of study for female students, chemical engineering is an exemplar of female participation with women making up over 40 per cent of the graduating cohort this semester.

Second-year chemical and environmental engineering student Geethu George says young women need strong female role models when setting out in engineering careers.

“Being in contact with female academics in my field of study encourages me to keep moving forward with my decision to pursue engineering,” Ms George said.

“Having women in these senior positions and watching them achieve success is essential to increasing female participation in engineering.”

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Want more information about engineering programs available at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

Monash University secures highest funding of $47.9m in research grants

Monash University has been awarded $47.9 million in the latest round of Australian Research Council (ARC) funding, the highest amount awarded to any university.

Monash achieved the highest funding for 18 ARC Future Fellowships of $13 million, and for five Linkage, Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities (LIEF) projects for which it was awarded $3.4 million.

Monash University secures highest funding of $47.9m in ARC grants

Study science and engineering at Monash University!

In addition, Monash achieved $7.5 million for 21 Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards (DECRA) and $24 million for 62 Discovery Projects.

The ARC funding will support a diverse range of research projects from enhancing a state-of-the-art microscope facility to analyse the atomic level structure of the natural world and advanced materials; understanding the role of mitochondria—the power generators of cells—in evolutionary adaptation; to developing a satellite that can measure moisture levels in soil more deeply than previously possible.

Announced by the Minister for Education and Training, Senator the Hon. Simon Birmingham, Monash was awarded funding by the ARC for work on 106 Projects across eight faculties and the Monash Indigenous Centre.

Monash University Vice-Provost (Research) Professor Pauline Nestor said Monash had achieved an outstanding result in the ARC grants, and it reflected the university’s high impact research work.

“These awards reflect the extremely high calibre of our research staff who are leading the way in delivering high impact outcomes to address the challenges facing the planet and impacting people’s quality of life,” Professor Nestor said.

Professor Joanne Etheridge, Director of the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy and Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, led one of the largest Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities (LIEF) awards for Australia this year. Professor Etheridge’s $1.8 million grant will deliver a revolutionary microscope to analyse the structure matter at the atomic level, building upon the outstanding research capability of the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy.

Professor Jeffrey Walker from the Monash Faculty of Engineering receives the largest Discovery Projects grant given to a Monash researcher this year of $923,500. Professor Walker’s five-year project will develop a new satellite that can remotely measure soil moisture to deeper levels than previously possible, giving farmers the data needed to optimise their available water resources and maximise food production.

Dr Damian Dowling from the Monash Faculty of Science was awarded an $805,008 ARC Future Fellowship. His project aims to discover if the genetic variation in mitochondria—the power generator of cells—contributes to evolutionary adaptation, and could reveal the role of mitochondria in adaptation to climatic stress.

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Want to learn more about engineering and science programs available at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

Global rankings confirm Monash as leader in engineering and technology

Monash University has been named Australia’s leading university in engineering and technology by an authoritative global rankings institution.

The Times Higher Education world university subject rankings 2016/17 announced has placed Monash 45th across the globe for engineering and technology—the highest ranking of any Australian university. Monash’s 45th ranking was eight places up on its rating for engineering and technology in last year’s rankings.

Global subject rankings confirm Monash as leader in engineering and technology

Monash is #1 in Australia for engineering and technology!

Monash’s high ranking in engineering and technology was underpinned by strong outcomes in teaching, international outlook, research, citations and industry income.

Further, Monash was ranked 41st in the world by Times Higher Education in clinical, pre-clinical and health and 63rd in business and economics. A total of 980 universities were included in the rankings.

President and Vice Chancellor of Monash University Professor Margaret Gardner AO said the results were further evidence of the university’s growing international reputation for outstanding research.

“Monash offers students the opportunity to study at a world-class university that produces research with global impact, collaborates with industry to drive innovation and attracts and retains the highest calibre of research and teaching staff,” Professor Gardner said.

“It’s wonderful to see the quality of our academics recognised. I particularly congratulate Monash staff in the fields of Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health, Engineering and Technology, Business and Economics and the Physical Sciences, all of which ranked among the top 100 this year.”

The Times Higher Education subject rankings follow the recent release of a number of global university rankings, each of which placed Monash in the top 100 universities in the world.

These rankings saw Monash placed 65th in the QS World University Rankings and 74th in the Times Higher Education rankings and 79th in the Academic Ranking of World Universities. Monash was also placed 32nd in the Reuters Top 75: Asia’s Most Innovative Universities.

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Find out more about studying engineering at Monash. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Employment initiatives boost student experience and graduate outcomes at Griffith University

A new range of career-focused initiatives will give Griffith University graduates a sharp competitive edge to improve their job prospects.

Griffith aims to include real-life industry experiences in all its degrees and programs.

Its students also have access to an e-mentoring program, a high-quality ePortfolio platform. Griffith is the first Australian university to operate a franchise of Unitemps—a recruitment service providing paid work opportunities for students.

These employability enhancing services have proved invaluable for recent mechanical engineering graduate Sebastian Speak, who has been employed full-time by Scout Aerial to design a drone launcher for an anti-poaching device, which will be used in Africa.

“I designed one launcher as part of a twelve-week internship and now I’m making thirty ready to be used in Africa to specifically target the illegal poaching of rhinoceros and elephants,” he said.

“I moved to Australia to specifically study at Griffith because I had heard it focused on preparing you for working in industry and I couldn’t be happier with my outcome.”

Griffith University Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) Professor Debra Henly said this year approximately 22,500 students were enrolled in courses that facilitate internships, work experience or work placements within industry professionals locally, nationally and globally.

She says there are almost 400 subject areas with a specific industry placement course option and that the University also assists with work experience and job placements outside of specific courses.

“Students across all study areas at Griffith will experience a range of opportunities to build their professional identity and career readiness throughout their degree,” she said.

“We are also moving to three 12-week trimesters in 2017, which will allow students greater flexibility to balance work and study, or to accelerate their study in some degrees.”

Griffith School of Education and Professional Studies academics Professor Glenn Finger and Dr Paula Jervis-Tracey recently published research about internships in the education industry in a book titled Teacher Education: Innovation, Intervention and Impact.

This quality research reinforces Griffith’s position as a leading university for graduate success and graduate employability, and is based on Griffith’s Employability Framework.

Professor Finger says internships are designed to inspire students to achieve their dream career: “Strengthening the connection between university and industry is the key to the success of internships,” Professor Finger said.

Griffith’s work with education internships has seen approximately 90 per cent of our graduates working in schools in Queensland.

Griffith’s key employability initiatives

Employment initiatives and graduate outcomes at Griffith University

Learn more about Griffith Uni!

Industry experiences – Griffith University has internship opportunities in every study group. It also offers up to 250 exclusive internships with the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games organising body (GOLDOC) through our official partnership.  Students completing internships with GOLDOC have the unique opportunity to earn 40 credit points, allowing them to fully immerse themselves in the organisation and apply their knowledge throughout their placement. Each year hundreds of students also travel overseas to enhance their degrees through global learning experiences, which are available in 48 countries.

Griffith Unitemps is the first Australian franchise of Unitemps, a UK-based student employment service providing paid work opportunities for students on campus and in South East Queensland businesses while they study.  It offers a broad range of general and degree-related vacancies aimed at improving employability before and after graduation.

Mentoring – Griffith Global eMentoring focuses on global engagement. It aims to support career development learning, global citizenship and graduate outcomes for Griffith students by connecting them to industry professionals beyond Australia’s borders. GGEM mentors not only assist Griffith students to gain a deeper understanding of their disciplines, they connect them to a world of opportunity. Griffith also runs the Industry Mentoring Program, and Griffith Business School is piloting eCareerCoaching.

Supported ePortfolio platform – Employers are increasingly looking for quality online portfolios when hiring, and ePortfolios allow students to document their professional and academic development as their studies progress. All Griffith students have access to build a high quality ePortfolio during their degree.

Professional profiling on LinkedIn – Students are encouraged to build and optimise their LinkedIn profile and enhance their employability prospects by connecting with industry professionals, employers and alumni. Griffith’s LinkedIn eModule provides expert guidance on developing an exceptional professional profile, including selecting the right photo and addressing the headline, summary, experiences and more.

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Discover more about your study options at Griffith University!

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world

Monash University has ranked 41 in the world in Civil Engineering, and placed in the top 100 and 200 universities across five further categories, according to the latest Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU).

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world

Monash Engineering ranked 41 in the world (Photo credit: Monash University)

Monash ranked in the top 100 universities for Chemical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Materials Engineering, and placed in the top 200 for Energy Science Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

Monash Provost and Senior Vice-President Professor Edwina Cornish commended staff and graduates on the latest world rankings.

“This outstanding result is a reflection of Monash Engineering’s world leading research which is focused on bringing real benefits to Australia into the future.”

ARWU ranks more than 1200 tertiary institutions each year and the best 500 are published.

Monash Engineering School

Did you know that Monash Engineering School offers the widest choice of engineering courses than any other Australian university?

Monash Engineering School offers a Master of Advanced Engineering, which commenced in 2015. Delivered at the Clayton campus, the Master of Advanced Engineering offers flexibility to complete your master degree in just one or two years depending on your previous study and work experience.

Specialisation options

  1. Chemical engineering
  2. Civil engineering (Water)
  3. Civil engineering (Transport)
  4. Civil engineering (Infrastructure Systems)
  5. Electrical engineering
  6. Energy and Sustainability (Malaysia campus only)
  7. Materials engineering
  8. Mechanical engineering

Apply to Monash Engineering School!

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Learn more about engineering degrees at Monash. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, July 4th, 2016

UQ engineering team blitzes NASA competition

Designing and building rockets and sending them into space is one of the most expensive endeavours on earth, costing upwards of $500 million.

But a team of University of Queensland engineers has come up with a cheap 3D-printable solution, earning them first place in the NASA Brisbane International Space Apps Challenge and an invitation to the international competition.

UQ engineering team blitzes NASA competition

UQ Rocket3D team (Photo credit: UQ)

The Rocket3D team, made up of UQ tunnel engineer Sam Grieve, and Thomas Reddell and Jianyong Wang, PhD students at the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, were given a brief to design a rocket that could be built inside the Kennedy Space Center.

“We chose to design a 3D-printed rocket because the technology has many advantages and it’s much easier to create complex geometries” Mr Grieve said.

“One guy in the competition produced a fully functioning asteroid mining computer game, which was absolutely amazing! It was a huge honour to be selected over that.”

The UQ engineering Rocket3D team incorporated an unconventional features into their design—an Aerospike engine—which they said would potentially provide a 30 per cent increase in fuel efficiency.

“Usually these engines aren’t used as they have problems with cooling, but a 3D-printed version could incorporate complex cooling channels as well as mass air pockets to improve cooling,” Mr Grieve said.

The competition, which challenges teams to find solutions to complex problems within 48 hours, is run simultaneously at locations around the world.

Ideas are summarised into a 10-minute pitch to a judging panel that considers if projects could be turned into viable product.

“Having a background studying and working at UQ was certainly a great advantage, as I had the confidence to approach problems that were new and unusual,” Mr Grieve said.

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Discover more about UQ engineering degrees! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Griffith design student’s 3D-printed guitars hit a sweet note

A Griffith University design student has produced the first two 3D-printed guitars on the Gold Coast.

The guitars were engineered with the skill, passion and commitment of third-year industrial design student Adrian McCormack under the direction of Associate Professor Dr Jennifer Loy at the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University.

Griffith student's 3D-printed guitars hit a sweet note

Griffith design student Adrian McCormack shows off his 3D-printed guitars (Photo credit: Griffith University)

The bespoke guitars highlight the limitless possibilities of 3D-printing technology and had their first public outing at the Blues on Broadbeach Festival recently.

The first design was brought to reality with help from Brisbane guitar builder and technician Rohan Staples at the renowned Guitar Shop in Paddington and printed at Griffith’s Gold Coast campus in seven components, while the second was printed in one complete piece by Belgian company Materialise.

Adrian says his wave design was inspired by the Gold Coast’s rich surfing culture, and explains he spent plenty of time studying the playing style and technique of blues guitarists.

“It was clear that arm support within the design was vital along with overall strength and of course, aesthetics,” he says.

“For the model printed overseas we used a bio-compatible and food-safe material called polyamide, which also ensured the body weight stayed roughly the same as a generic Telecaster body.

“For the locally printed guitar, once the model pieces had been tested and prototyped, they were printed over the course of eight days on campus, with around 200 hours of printing.

“This guitar print also featured a unique process called ‘hot swapping,’ which created the unique red and white finish,” he says.

The locally printed guitar will stay on campus, finding a home at the Griffith Red Zone, while the second guitar will be offered as a prize for a Festival-goer to be announced later this month and presented at Griffith’s Open Day on July 24.

According to Associate Professor Loy, Griffith is working hard to develop graduates who have specialised skills in this area.

“Our industrial design and 3D design digital media students are learning world leading software for additive manufacturing, and gaining hands-on experience of designing with advanced digital technologies, including 3D Printing, scanning and electronics for new design applications.

“3D printing is not just an add-on technology within the digital landscape—it has matured and now completely changes what is possible.

“We envisage that the students of today will have the jobs of the future, ones that may not even exist yet, but that are clearly on the way, with 3D printing alone being forecast as a 7-billion-dollar-a-year sector by 2020.”

About the Bachelor of Industrial Design

In this degree, students will combine a creative engineering approach with industrial design innovation and will graduate with a unique ability for innovation and creativity in Industrial Design while working within the principles of engineering. Students learn through project-based design studios and technical learning studios and learning through making, as the degree takes a hands-on approach to teaching that uses advanced technologies such as 3D printing, while also experiencing traditional engineering learning.

Bachelor of Industrial Design students will learn about design process, material characteristics, mechanics and electronics as well as 3D computer modelling, creative thinking and digital media. This degree also incorporates an international focus on digital and advanced technology manufacturing, giving you the chance to develop an understanding of how a product is created, from design to delivery, in a global context now and in the emerging advanced manufacturing environment.

Program: Bachelor of Industrial Design
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University!

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Discover more about studying industrial design and engineering at Griffith. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Melbourne chemical engineering students claim Pratt Prize victory

A team of chemical engineering and biomolecular engineering students from the Melbourne School of Engineering has taken out the 2016 Pratt Prize for the best Chemical Engineering Design Project in Victoria.

The winning team, Lachlan Henderson, Huixuan Yu, Rob Murray, Chen-Yu Tsai, Yonathan Christianto and Suya He, developed a method to produce biodiesel from microalgae through a detailed facility design of unit operations.

Chemical Engineering Design Project

Left to right: Suya He, Huixuan Yu, Yonathan Christianto, Chen-Yu Tsai and Robert Pratt (son of Clive Pratt). Absent: Robert Murray and Lachlan Henderson (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

The award is presented in honour of Professor Henry Reginald Clive Pratt and his contributions to chemical engineering, recognising a Victorian student team presenting the best chemical engineering design project.

The three Victorian universities that offer a degree in Chemical Engineering, the University of Melbourne, Monash University and RMIT contest the award each year.

Team member Chen-Yu Tsai said that the team worked hard to develop their project and undertake research within the time constraints.

“We are very glad that out hard work was recognized” Chen-Yu said.

“The project was very challenging but the experience is valuable. The design project did not only provide me the chance to apply knowledge from my degree to a real life case, but I have also learnt to solve problems in general and to be a good team player.”

Yonathan Christianto also said that his experience of working on the project was very challenging, yet it was the “best experience” he has had at the university.

The team will now compete for the Australasian Design Project Prize at the Chemeca 2016 conference in September.

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Discover more about studying engineering at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Sydney Opera House project assisted by University of Sydney researchers

Sydney’s iconic Opera House has embarked on a concrete conservation project that will keep the grand diva of construction looking its best for future artists, audiences and visitors.

The Sydney Opera House in conjunction with researchers from the University of Sydney have spent the past 18 months researching and cataloging an inventory of renovation and restoration needs for the World Heritage-listed site.

University of Sydney Architecture School

The famous Sydney Opera House

The project forms part of the Getty Foundation’s Keeping It Modern initiative, dedicated to the conservation of significant 20th century architecture around the world.

“The Opera House is one of the world’s most recognisable concrete buildings. With its unique sculptural form, the building is known for its innovative use of structural concrete as an architectural element,” says Sydney Opera House Building Director Greg McTaggart.

“As we renew the building for the next generation we are currently reviewing and updating our asset management approach. The team’s research results will be integrated into the Opera House’s long-term conservation management plan and will be easily accessible to building managers and staff involved in the day-to-day maintenance of the building.”

Professor Gianluca Ranzi from the University of Sydney School of Civil Engineering said, “Concrete is a highly versatile material that has been used since the Roman Empire.

“In the last century it enjoyed a renaissance and, since then, has been used as primary material in many modern-day constructions, including the Opera House designed by Jørn Utzon and completed in 1973.

“Academics and students from the disciplines of civil engineering, chemical engineering, architectural science and heritage conservation have been involved in this project by undertaking specialised students’ projects.

“They have been contributing to various aspects ranging from the analysis of past and current concrete condition assessment reports to the development of the structural assessment framework for the Opera House within the context of concrete conservation principles, addressing the needs of historic twentieth-century concrete buildings.

“This has been an extraordinary experience for our students who have been able to be exposed to one of world’s most attractive concrete structures, and it has been a pleasure to see them engaged with this project,” says Professor Ranzi.

Master of Architecture

The Master of Architecture degree operates around a series of studios that require students to engage at a graduate level with projects with an emphasis on research, design and vision. Student work is defined by the rigours of industry practice and surveys the social, environmental, practical and aesthetic needs of the brief while working within the larger context of architectural theory and philosophy. The University of Sydney is currently ranked #1 in Australia for architecture according to the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016.

Degree: Master of Architecture
Location: Darlington Campus, Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March and July
Application deadline: January 30 and June 29; however, it is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to the University of Sydney Architecture School!

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Would you like more information about studying architecture at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

University of Queensland ranked among world’s best

The University of Queensland is number one in Australia in two subject areas and among the world’s top 20 in four, a global review published this week confirms.

The QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016 places 11 UQ subject areas in the world’s top 30.

University of Queensland

University of Queensland ranked is among world’s best

UQ ranks at number one in Australia in Mineral Resources and Mining Engineering (10th globally) and Environmental Science (12th globally).

The university ranks 17th globally in Agriculture and Forestry and 18th in Education.

UQ’s other QS global top-30 subjects:

Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said UQ’s top-ranked subjects deserved their national and international acclaim.

“It’s fitting that a leading university in a biodiverse and resource-rich nation is among the world’s best in mining and environmental subjects,” he said.

“Our globally strong performance in these subjects is a reflection of UQ’s hard work in areas where we can create change for industry and the environment.”

Professor Høj said it was gratifying that the University of Queensland had high-ranking QS subjects across the wide span of the university’s endeavour.

“UQ’s quality teaching and research takes place across a comprehensive range of top-rated disciplines, with an enviable breadth not enjoyed by all universities,” he said.

“This interdisciplinary strength is a great asset to UQ researchers and students.”

Professor Høj said the QS subject data reflected UQ’s position among the world’s top 50 universities, as ranked in the QS World University Rankings and the Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities, and within the top 100 in another five key independent rankings.

QS assessed 42 subject areas in 2016, with 37 UQ subject areas featuring in the top 100.

The QS World University Rankings by Subject, published annually since 2011, highlights the world’s leading institutions in individual subject areas.

This year QS evaluated 4,226 universities in more than 60 countries.