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Articles categorized as ‘Monash University Arts Programs’

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

Monash journalism students named finalists

Two Monash University student journalists are finalists in the Walkley Young Journalist of the Year Awards and the Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.

Jack Paynter’s story “Cricket willow tree project drives investors bats” was published in The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald.

Monash journalism students named finalists

Ms Nicola McCaskill and Mr Jack Paynter (Photo credit: Monash University)

It told the story of a group that offered investments in willow trees to make cricket bats, and continued to demand fees from investors despite no sales over 16 years.

His story earned him a place among the top three in the student award section of the Walkley Young Journalist of the Year.

Nicola McCaskill has produced a highly original and award-winning photo essay about a day in the life of a Melbourne sex worker.

Nicola is a finalist for the Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship, a paid internship working with some of Australia’s best TV news and current affairs journalists.

Monash Journalism alumna and Leader journalist Therese Allaoui was named a finalist in the Community/Regional Journalism award for the Young Walkleys.

Monash journalism digital journalism coordinator Julie Tullberg said the Young Walkleys were highly competitive among many journalism schools across Australia.

“It’s a credit to Jack to be named a finalist in the Young Walkleys, as there are just three spots up for grabs,” Ms Tullberg said.

“Nicola’s photo essay is brilliant and her talent for photojournalism has been recognised by the judges of the Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.”

Therese, an award-winning journalist, was recognised for work published in the Mordialloc Chelsea Leader and Port Philip Leader, including “Deadly drugs on salw,” “Players left in the dark,” and “Taste of prosperity.”

The winner of each category will qualify for the Walkley Young Australian Journalist of the Year and will undertake work experience with CNN, Twitter and Huffington Post in the United States.

Master of Journalism at Monash University

The Master of Journalism is for people who want to enter a career in journalism, and for working journalists who want to extend their skills and explore the intellectual basis of their practice. Students work with award-winning journalists and academics with strong industry links as they cultivate high-level skills in research and reporting across all media—print, online, radio and video—and explore the role of the media in contemporary society.

Program: Master of Journalism
Location: Caulfield Campus, suburb of Melbourne
Duration: 1 – 2 years (depending upon candidate’s educational background)
Semester intakes: March and July
Application deadline: It is recommended that you apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to a Monash University arts degree!

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Would you like more information about Monash Journalism programs? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Ancient burial ground discovered at the Plain of Jars

Researchers are a step closer to unravelling one of the great prehistoric puzzles of South East Asia, after discovering an ancient burial ground, including human remains, at the Plain of Jars in central Laos.

The discoveries were made during excavations conducted in February 2016 and led by a team of Australian and Lao researchers including Dr Louise Shewan from the Monash University Warwick Alliance and Centre for Archaeology and Ancient History, Dr Dougald O’Reilly from the Australian National University and Dr Thonglith Luangkhoth of the Lao Ministry of Information, Culture and Tourism.

 Monash University

Researchers at the Laos site (Photo: Monash University)

The fieldwork is part of a five-year project funded by the Australian Research Council aimed at uncovering the mysteries surrounding the 90-plus jar sites, including who made the jars, what they were used for, and how the sites came into existence.

The sites, located in the central Lao province of Xieng Khouang, comprise large carved stone jars of varying sizes—some as big as two metres in diameter and three metres high. Initially brought to the attention of science by French researcher Madeleine Colani in the 1930s, the sites have remained largely unstudied due to the huge quantity of unexploded bombs in the area—the result of heavy bombing during the ‘Secret War’ in Laos in the 1970s.

The recent excavations—the first major excavations in nearly two decades—uncovered an ancient burial ground in an area known as ‘Site 1,’ and revealed various burial methods including the internment of whole bodies, the burying of bundled bones and bundled bones placed inside ceramic vessels and then buried.

Dr Shewan, who is analysing teeth found at the burial ground, says the project has the potential to ascertain who these people were and where they lived.

“My research involves the measurement of strontium isotopes in human dental enamel to shed light on the home environment of the individual,” Dr Shewan says. “Teeth mineralise at different ages, so by analsying different teeth we are able to ascertain where an individual lived during their childhood.”

The results of the project will be showcased in the CAVE2 facility with support from the Monash Immersive Visualisation Platform.

“To visualise all our research findings, including excavation data, remote sensing data and drone imagery in the CAVE2 environment is going to greatly assist our analysis and interpretation and provides a unique opportunity to conduct ‘virtual fieldwork’ in areas that are inaccessible by foot. From the drone imagery we may also be able to identify potential occupation areas. At present there are no known occupation sites. No one knows where these people lived,” Dr Shewan said.

The research will assist the Lao government in their bid to have the jar sites nominated for UNESCO World Heritage status.

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Find out more about studying Archaeology and Ancient History at Monash University!

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Monash University launches innovative media lab

A state-of-the-art media lab will be officially launched on April 7, 2016 at Monash University’s Caulfield campus.

Waleed Aly, well-known journalist and Monash academic, will launch the Monash Media Lab, which is part of the Monash Arts School of Media, Film and Journalism.

Monash University Arts

Monash Media Lab, Monash Arts School of Media, Film and Journalism (Photo: Monash University) (Photo: Monash University)

The Media Lab will provide a unique environment that will transform the way students learn, giving them the skills to navigate a new, high-tech world of media and journalism.

Waleed Aly’s opening talk will underline the impact that can be achieved when ideas and media professionalism come together.

The lunchtime launch will be followed by a mini film festival in the Media Lab’s theatrette and an evening panel chaired by the ABC’s Virginia Trioli.

The evening panel, featuring industry professionals and former students, will focus on the rapidly changing media environment and what it means for future careers.  The importance of having technologically advanced facilities for educating and providing young people with the skills they need to be industry ready when they graduate will be explored in this session.

Many School of Media, Film and Journalism scholars are also journalists and film-makers with significant industry experience. As part of the launch, a mini film festival will highlight recent works by Dr Romaine Moreton and Associate Professor Tony Moore. Dr Moreton’s critically acclaimed short films The Farm (2009) and The Oysterman (2013) will be shown as well as A/Prof Moore’s feature length documentary Death or Liberty. The documentary is based on the book co-written by Moore and was broadcast in Ireland in 2015 and on ABC television in early 2016.

The Media Lab features equipment and facilities that will transform the way journalism, film and media are taught and learnt.  The facilities include

  • two radio/sound production studios with an adjacent control-room/audio production and teaching suite;
  • an open-plan newsroom;
  • broadcast TV and video production studio announcer/guest desk for six people with mobile tripod mounted cameras, overhead lighting grid and full sound and vision cabling and graphics screen;
  • a control room/vision mixing production and teaching suite; and
  • two laboratories, each with 24 student computer terminals, e-lecterns, interactive screens and optical fibre cabling for synchronous and asynchronous blended teaching and learning activities.

The Media Lab will also provide the means to demonstrate and develop MFJ’s industry engagement and research impact in the community through radio, TV, and online current affairs journalism, documentaries and short films.

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Learn more about the studying media and journalism at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shanno@oztrekk.com for more information about Australian arts degrees!

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Monash journalism students tour iconic newsrooms

Master of Journalism students have benefitted from a life-changing experience when they participated in a new Monash  overseas program, Journalism Futures: New York Field School.

The students, under the guidance of Journalism lecturers Deb Anderson and Stephanie Brookes, learned from journalism and political leaders in major organisations in New York and Washington DC over 10 days in December.

Monash Journalism School

Monash Master of Journalism student Tiffany Korssen (Photo credit: Monash University)

Each student drew from scholarly and popular literature as well their immersive experience to formulate an individual research project, adopting a case-study approach to their topic.

A range of iconic and cutting-edge newsrooms and institutions opened their doors to the students.

In New York, site visits included the Wall Street Journal, Associated Press (AP), Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, The New York Times printing facility, Mother Jones magazine, the Paley Center for Media (Museum of Television & Radio) and the US National 9/11 Memorial Museum.

In Washington DC, the students gained exclusive access to the Press Gallery and a US Senate office at Capitol Hill. Then they visited BuzzFeed, the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, US News & World Report and Georgetown University’s media school—also meeting journalists from The Washington Post, Bloomberg, Politico reported.ly and The Hill.

“It was such a thrill to show students the ways change and innovation are sweeping through these newsrooms,” said Dr Anderson, who created the program together with Dr Brookes.

“We designed the unit to show what it is like to be a media practitioner today, and how news values are shifting to capture shifting audiences.

“In turn, the class of Monash students on tour showed us different ways of thinking about the future of journalism. They shared their hopes, dreams and creative responses to challenges facing the news media.

“Stephanie and I felt privileged to share such an experience with these incredible minds, for these students will help shape the future of the news industry.”

Head of Monash Journalism Associate Professor Phil Chubb, said the students enjoyed a productive study tour.

“Reading the Facebook site set up for students doing this trip while they were away—as well as after they got back—was an eye-opener,” Assoc Professor Chubb said.

“For many of the students this Monash field trip to New York and Washington was a life-changing experience. I was proud of our staff and students.”

Dr Anderson and Dr Brookes aim to expand the program this year, building on feedback from the 2015 cohort, adding more sites to the tour.

“With the New York Field School we aim to give Monash students the confidence to approach and work with people in leading communications and news outlets,” Dr Anderson said.

“It’s about gaining an international edge in a very competitive job market. It’s also about students learning from each other in a foreign context—connecting with their peers.”

Master of Communications and Media Studies student Cameron Grimes agreed. He said the 2015 tour was an unrivalled opportunity to meet people in the global media industry.

And he found one of the best parts of the tour was “connecting with other students and learning about each other’s interests and passions.”

Master of Journalism student Tiffany Korssen used the opportunity to gain valuable industry experience for her CV. She applied for a coveted News Corporation traineeship while on the US study tour—with success.

Master of Journalism at Monash University

The Master of Journalism is for people who want to enter a career in journalism, and for working journalists who want to extend their skills and explore the intellectual basis of their practice. Students work with award-winning journalists and academics with strong industry links as they cultivate high-level skills in research and reporting across all media—print, online, radio and video—and explore the role of the media in contemporary society.

Program: Master of Journalism
Location: Caulfield Campus, suburb of Melbourne
Duration: 1 – 2 years (depending upon candidate’s educational background)
Semester intakes: March and July
Application deadline: It is recommended that you apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry requirements

A bachelor’s degree with a credit average or a graduate diploma with a credit average, or qualifications or experience that the faculty considers to be equivalent to or a satisfactory substitute for the above. Please note English proficiency requirements must be met.

Apply to a Monash University arts degree!

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Learn more about the Master of Journalism at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information about Australian journalism programs and other Australian arts degrees! Email shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

Global mentors for Monash University students

The value of a mentor both personally and professionally to provide guidance, support and advice is almost universal. However, in the aid and development sector, identifying, approaching and building a mentoring relationship can be far from easy or natural.

Monash University Faculty of Arts

Study Master of International Development Practice at Monash (Photo credit: Monash University)

Dr Samanthi Gunawardana, Course Coordinator for the Master of International Development Practice at Monash University and professional development consultancy WhyDev have collaborated to create Colab m, an online mentoring program. Colab m facilitates a unique, two-way learning experience, between Monash Master of International Development Practice students and experienced development practitioners from around the world. The program has been designed as part of a collaborative research project that examines employability skills in development sector work.

“Colab m is intended to enrich students’ university experience by helping them understand and build the knowledge, skills and tools required for a career in international development,” said Dr Gunawardana.

The program will pair 23 aspiring and entry-level development workers with development professionals from around the world. During the 14-week program, mentors and mentees will spend up to four hours each month working through custom-designed mentoring modules, building a relationship, discussing development practice and sharing knowledge.

According to Brendan Rigby, co-founder of WhyDev the program also has more far reaching applications.

“Although this pilot is exclusively for Monash students, WhyDev’s vision is to roll out this program globally for students, volunteers and practitioners in the development sector within 18 months,” Brendan Rigby said.

The Master of International Development Practice is designed to address the complex political, economic, cultural and ecological challenges contributing to extreme poverty, reduced health, environmental vulnerability and fragile governance, factors that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide.

WhyDev provides professional development and consultancy services to individuals, communities, and organisations committed to global development. WhyDev work in areas that are often overlooked, by supporting and building the capacity of individuals and communities committed to getting development right.

What is International Development Practice?

Delivered by specialists from the humanities, social sciences, medicine, business and economics, education and law, the course offers a multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable development with four streams: Democracy, justice and governance; Gender, conflict and society; Crisis, change and management; and Sustainable resource management.

Program: Master of International Development Practice
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 1 / 1.5 / 2 years (depending on candidate’s background)
Semester intake: February or July each year

Apply to Monash Master of International Development Practice!

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Are you interested in studying at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Arts Programs Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

New state-of-the-art media centre at Monash Caulfield campus

There is a distinct buzz around the Monash School of Media, Film and Journalism as the new multi-million-dollar Media Centre moves into the final stages of completion.

Monash University School of Media, Film and Journalism

Study at the Monash School of Media, Film and Journalism

Boasting state-of-the-art facilities and resources, the centre will transform the way students learn and enrich their educational experience.

The facilities include

  • laboratories and classrooms, each with 24 student computer terminals, e-lecterns, interactive screens and optical-fibre cabling for synchronous and asynchronous blended teaching and learning activities;
  • radio and sound production facilities with an adjacent control-room/audio production and teaching suite;
  • an open-plan news room;
  • television facilities with podium and announcer/guest desk with mobile tripod mounted cameras, overhead lighting grid and full sound and vision cabling and graphics screen; and
  • a control room/vision mixing, production and teaching suite.

The Monash Journalism program is the largest and most comprehensive program in the country and these new facilities will enable the school to develop an even stronger program with a focus on innovation and industry engagement.

Preparing students for a changing media environment

One of the key benefits of these new facilities will be the increased capacity to offer Monash Faculty of Arts students an educational experience designed to meet the demands of a rapidly changing media landscape and the need for high-level skills in communication, media literacy and cultural literacy.

Monash intends to achieve this through

  • developing students who are more work-ready. There will be increased opportunities for hands-on experience using digital broadcast and production facilities similar to those used in the workplace. There will also be increased internship opportunities allowing students to broaden their skills and networks.
  • enriching the educational experience. At undergraduate and postgraduate level Monash will introduce new and enhanced units that are directly aligned with the new facilities. These developments will continue to attract and retain the best and brightest staff and students.
  • expanding industry connections. The facilities will provide greater opportunity for industry and community engagement allowing the university to strengthen ties and develop networks.

The new Media Centre will be up and running at the end of 2015.

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Learn more about the studying media and journalism at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about Australian journalism programs and other Australian arts degrees! Email rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Wednesday, August 19th, 2015

Monash professor appointed Chair in Cultural Linguistics

Professor Farzad Sharifian has recently been appointed as the Chair in Cultural Linguistics at Monash, the first appointment of its kind in the world, establishing Monash’s position as the leading institution in this newly developed field of research.

Monash University Linguistics

Professor Farzad Sharifian holds the Chair of Cultural Linguistics within the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures, and Linguistics (Photo credit: Monash University)

Cultural linguistics explores the relationship between language and cultural conceptualisations. This field has important implications for intercultural and cross-cultural communication, an area of commitment and priority for Monash University.

Professor Rae Frances, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, said that she was proud to have the Chair in Cultural Linguistics in her faculty.

“It is very fitting recognition of Professor Sharifian’s impressive and innovative research, drawing together as it does cutting edge concepts from diverse and complementary disciplines to produce new perspectives on the intersection between culture, cognition and language, with wide-ranging implications.”

It is also fitting that the world’s first Chair in Cultural Linguistics is an Australian appointment, since it was Professor Sharifian’s research into inter-cultural communication between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians that led to the establishment of this new field. Professor Sharifian explains that “the data from this Australian research contributes significantly to the development of the cultural linguistics field.”

Recognized worldwide as a leading authority in the field of Cultural Linguistics, Professor Sharifian has developed a theoretical and an analytical framework of cultural cognition, cultural conceptualisations, and language, and these frameworks have so far been successfully applied to the areas of intercultural communication, cross-cultural pragmatics, teaching English as an International Language, World Englishes, and political discourse analysis.

The international publisher Springer has just launched a book series with the title of Cultural Linguistics, with Professor Sharifian as its Series Editor. Professor Sharifian is also the founding Editor-in-Chief of the recently launched the International Journal of Language and Culture (John Benjamins).

The First International Conference of Cultural Linguistics will be held at Monash Prato Centre in July 2016, with Professor Sharifian as a keynote speaker. Monash University has also launched a new scholarship entitled The Farzad Sharifian PhD Scholarship in the field of Cultural Linguistics.

Professor Sharifian is currently the President of Applied Linguistics Association of Australia, a Director of the International Association for World Englishes, and a Fellow of Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany.

Study Linguistics at Monash University

Program: Master of Applied Linguistics
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 1 / 1.5 / 2 years (depending on candidate’s background)
Semester intake: February or July each year

Apply to the Master of Applied Linguistics at Monash University!

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Would you like more information about linguistics and language studies at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

Monash student wins prize for journalism

Monash University’s Jenan Taylor has earned national recognition for her unique pauper story, winning the Guy Morrison Prize for Literary Journalism.

Jenan, a Master of Journalism student, was presented with her prize at the Sydney Writers’ Festival on May 22, which coincided with UTS’s anthology launch.

Monash University Journalism

Congratulations to Jenan Taylor!

Her award-winning story, A Quiet Farewell, was published in The Weekend Australian Magazine.

Jenan’s prize follows her recent success as the Melbourne Press Club’s 2014 Student Journalist of the Year, awarded for the same investigative story.

Applications for UTS’s Guy Morrison Prize are invited from Australian undergraduate or postgraduate students who are studying either journalism, communication or writing.

Jenan is thrilled to win the prize for her investigation into what happens when a pauper dies.

“My story on the pauper funeral of a single mother was an attempt to highlight what we take for granted in contemporary Australia isn’t necessarily within everyone’s reach, not even after we die,” Jenan said.

“It’s difficult journalism that keeps throwing up, among other challenges, its own range of moral and ethical questions, the more I practice it.

“However, I’m absolutely elated to have to won this award and feel particularly encouraged to keep pursuing this kind of journalism.”

Jenan said it was too easy in this age of 24-hour news to lose sight of the complexities and nuances behind the headlines.

“For me literary journalism is about revealing these insights and even throwing a spotlight on lives which we would normally never think twice about, which is why I’ve always been attracted to it,” she said.

Jenan said Monash journalism staff Associate Professor Philip Chubb and Dr Monica Jackson were encouraging as she researched her story, and thanked them for their support.

Judge Chris Feik described Jenan’s article as a “wonderful piece of reporting.”

“It does what the best journalism does: it tells us things we didn’t know,” Mr Feik wrote.

“It explains what happens when a pauper dies. We witness in vivid close-up the embalming of an anonymous woman who ‘could not afford to die’.

“Throughout the piece, the writer addresses the deceased subject. ‘Am I ready to touch your skin,’ Jenan asks, and decides: ‘I am’. Such a device could easily seem forced, but is handled skilfully here.”

Master of Journalism at Monash University

The Master of Journalism is for people who want to enter a career in journalism, and for working journalists who want to extend their skills and explore the intellectual basis of their practice. Students work with award-winning journalists and academics with strong industry links as they cultivate high-level skills in research and reporting across all media—print, online, radio and video—and explore the role of the media in contemporary society.

Program: Master of Journalism
Location: Caulfield Campus, suburb of Melbourne
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: March and July
Application deadline: It is recommended that you apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry requirements

A bachelor’s degree with a credit average or a graduate diploma with a credit average, or qualifications or experience that the faculty considers to be equivalent to or a satisfactory substitute for the above. Please note English proficiency requirements must be met.

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Learn more about the Master of Journalism at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about Australian journalism programs and other Australian arts degrees! Email rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, May 25th, 2015

Monash students bring The Handmaid’s Tale to life

A theatrical production of Margaret Atwood’s award winning novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, will premiere in Australia for the first time at Monash University this month.

Adapted by the Monash Uni Student Theatre (MUST) (MSA), tickets are on sale now. Performances will take place on weekday and Saturday evenings, as well as Saturday matinee performances at the university’s Clayton campus, from May 28 – June 6.

Monash University Faculty of Arts

Imogen Walsh as Offred. Photo by Sarah Wallace

All of the cast and crew are students, and with 30 cast members and 20 crew. All Monash faculties are represented.

Published in 1985, the dystopian novel has previously been adapted for film, radio, opera and stage. Set in the near future, in what was once the United States of America, a dictatorship quickly takes control after the assassination of the president.

Under the pretext of restoring order, the new regime reorganises society into social classes, and quickly strips away women’s rights. Presented through the eyes of a female character called Offred, who describes her new life as a handmaid, the gripping story is a vivid portrayal of how life changes irrevocably.

Yvonne Virsik, Director of the Monash University adaption, said the decision to adapt Margaret Atwood’s book for the stage was unanimous amongst MUST.

“Margaret Atwood’s novel is compelling and raw, and this production intimately observes a society with frightening parallels to our own society. Through Offred we see the evil that can be done by denying individuals the freedom over their identity and even their life,” Yvonne said.

The Handmaid’s Tale offers incredible dynamic material for the stage and I would urge anyone, whether they have read the book or not, to come along and see the play. This production will showcase the talents of Melbourne’s future theatre generation,” she said.

Monash Uni Student Theatre (MUST)

Monash Uni Student Theatre (MUST) is a department of the Monash Student Association, run by professional theatre makers, that creates vibrant, innovative theatre by, with, and for Monash University students and the wider community. Their works are diverse, ranging from new text-based and devised works to bold takes on classics, adaptations, events and exhibitions.

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Are you interested in studying arts at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Arts Programs Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

Social identity underpins views on climate change

Strategies for building support for climate change mitigation policies should go beyond attempts to improve the public’s understanding of science, according to new research.

The study, published recently in Nature Climate Change, found that when it came to human-induced climate change, the actions and beliefs of both skeptics and believers could be understood as integrated expressions of self, underpinning specific social identities.

Using an online survey of climate change skeptics and believers living in the US, researchers from Monash University and other universities measured differences between the two groups in terms of environmental behaviours, emotional responses, national and global identification, and a number of other variables.

Monash University Arts

Research shows there is a sharp division in beliefs about the causes of climate change

Social scientist Dr Ana-Maria Bliuc from the Monash School of Social Sciences said although there was a growing belief among the general public that climate change was real, there was also a sharp division in beliefs about its causes, with many people skeptical of human-induced change.

“We found the contrasting opinions of believers and skeptics about the causes of climate change provided the basis of social identities that define who they are, what they stand for, and who they stand with (and against),” Dr Bliuc said.

“In making up an aspect of self, these beliefs and emotional reactions can predict support for actions that advance the positions of each group.”

The researchers also found that part of the group consciousness of each group was anger at the opposing side.

“This finding suggests that antagonising skeptics and increasing their anger towards their opponents is likely to polarise them further, making them more committed to act in support of their cause,” Dr Bliuc said.

The researchers suggest the divisions between the two groups are unlikely to be overcome by communication and education strategies alone.

“Interventions that increase angry opposition to action on climate change are especially problematic,” Dr Bliuc said.

“Strategies for building support for mitigation policies should go beyond attempts to improve the public’s understanding of science, to include approaches that will change the relationship between the two groups.”

The study was undertaken by researchers from Monash University, the University of Western Sydney, Murdoch University and Flinders University.

Monash University Faculty of Arts

Over the past 50 years, Monash Arts has positioned itself as a faculty without borders. There are no limits on the faculty’s thinking and no boundaries on their knowledge. The faculty thrives on exploring new ways to see the world. This, combined with their extensive international connections and close to 60 areas of study, makes Monash Arts one of the most popular arts faculties in the world.

The Monash Sociology program is one of the largest sociology programs in Australia and there are more than 80 sociologists working throughout Monash. Monash is currently ranked among the world’s best sociology departments for our research.

The focus of sociology is the study of human society. It involves the investigation of human groups, communities, institutions and organisations, and the networks of meaning and association which link individuals and groups to the broader social structure of society. Sociologists are also concerned with the analysis of policy, for example public health policy, and its impact on society and individuals. Sociologists have developed a range of research methods and techniques, and theoretical approaches, that can be applied to diverse issues and problems in social life. Coursework studies in sociology at Monash aim to provide the student with a broad range of relevant and widely applicable research skills and equip them for careers in social research, government, industry and the public service.

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Are you interested in studying arts at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Arts Programs Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.