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Articles categorized as ‘Macquarie University Arts Programs’

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

New Cyber Security Hub at Macquarie University

Optus Business and Macquarie University have joined forces to establish a multi-disciplinary Cyber Security Hub to support businesses and government to recognise and protect themselves from increasing cyber threats.

The new ‘Optus Macquarie University Cyber Security Hub’ will provide research, short professional courses and consultancy services to the private sector and government agencies.

Optus Business and Macquarie University to establish new Cyber Security Hub

John Paitaridis, Managing Director, Optus Business and Professor David Wilkinson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Engagement and Advancement), Macquarie University. (Credit: Paul Wright)

It represents a $10-million investment by Optus Business and Macquarie University that will draw on the expertise of Optus and leading Macquarie University academics from various disciplines and industry experts to cover three academic areas: Science and IT, Business and Economics; and Security Studies and Criminology. It will focus on providing a holistic approach to cybercrime, how it is perpetrated, how it affects the economy and how it impacts policy.

The partnership includes degree programs, executive and business short courses, professional recruiting opportunities and thought leadership through cyber awareness events and international engagements in areas such as intelligence, technology, criminology, finance and governance.

John Paitaridis, Managing Director, Optus Business, said “As Australian enterprises and government agencies increasingly embrace the digital economy and shifting consumer expectations of online experience, cyber security is a top priority for Executives and Boards.

“While cyber-attacks are increasing in frequency and sophistication, most organisations lack the right expertise and skills across their business to identify and manage these attacks.

“As organisations adopt more online and digital channels, they also need to have a fully integrated approach to cyber security involving all staff training, management buy-in, effective technology solutions and knowledge of today’s cyber threats.

“The Optus Macquarie University Cyber Security Hub addresses all these areas, providing businesses and government agencies with a unique and unparalleled cyber offering to help them navigate a complex landscape. We are committed to empowering every person, business and organisation to confidently operate in the digital world, and this partnership is a significant step in helping us deliver on that promise.”

Supporting the Federal Government’s recent cyber security strategy—which outlines plans to make Australia a cyber-smart nation—the new Cyber Hub will have a range of initiatives to enhance Macquarie University’s teaching and research offering. Optus’ workforce will also be a key focus, with the partnership increasing awareness, as well as equipping and upskilling staff with the latest cyber security skills and expertise. Optus will offer the same opportunity to its enterprise and government customers.

David Wilkinson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Corporate Engagement and Advancement), Macquarie University said, “Education underpins the very success of the government’s Cyber Strategy, and is the cornerstone of any cyber security program.

“Cyber security has become one of the defining issues of this decade, which is why Macquarie University was one of the first in the country to establish a dedicated policing, intelligence and counter-terrorism degree.

“The opportunity to partner with Optus, an organisation that deals with cyber threats and challenges on a daily basis, was something we welcomed as it enables us to improve cyber security education at all levels—from the C-level executive through to every employee.

“By collaborating with industry to tailor our study programs, we give our students a head-start in their careers, placing them at the top of Australia’s cyber security talent pool. These initiatives will also work to support the wider expansion of cyber security training within organisations to better secure and protect their networks and infrastructure.”

Optus and Macquarie University signed the agreement in May and envisage the Cyber Security Hub will attract partners from the public and private sector who want to generate knowledge and foster enhancements in cyber security technologies and governance, through research and innovation.

Master of International Security Studies

The Master of International Security Studies goes beyond the traditional security challenges such as military conflict and can include challenges to human, societal, economic and environmental security. This degree explores the strategies being developed to respond to these security and intelligence threats. It covers a broad spectrum of traditional and non-traditional security issues examined from a regional and global context.

Some topics of study

  • Counter Terrorism
  • Terrorism Dynamics
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency
  • Cyber Crime
  • International Policing Systems
  • Practice of Modern Intelligence
  • Intelligence Analysis Platforms
  • Cyber Security
  • Cyber Policing and Intelligence
  • Nuclear Weapons

Career Opportunities

  • Advisers and analysts for private security agencies
  • Advisers and analysts to international organisations involved in security operations
  • Border protection agency officials strategists
  • Commentators and researchers for media outlets
  • Researchers for intelligence agencies

Program: Master of International Security Studies
Location: North Ryde, Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, it is recommended that candidates apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to Macquarie University!

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Learn more about studying at Macquarie University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Macquarie University international scholarships

What does the Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship cover?

Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship is a partial scholarship for undergraduate and postgraduate studies, the amount is varied up to AUD$10,000 and it will be applied towards your tuition fee.

Macquarie University

Study at Macquarie University

Priority areas: Engineering, Environment, Human Science, Media, Linguistics, and Education.

Application Deadline – June 29, 2016

The Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarships do not provide financial support in the form of a living allowance, nor does it provide for the cost of visa application, Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC), airfares, accommodation, conferences or other costs associated with study.

The Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship is a single scholarship and not available to be renewed. Please note that applicants can only receive one scholarship.

Applicants applying for the Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarship will not be required to submit a referee’s report or a statement of purpose. Once you have completed the online scholarship application form, a confirmation email will be sent to you at your nominated email address. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Environment

Degree: Master of Environment (Environmental Management)
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

The Master of Environment offers an interdisciplinary approach to environmental management. A major focus of the degree is to teach you how to work with people from different disciplinary perspectives in order to find environmental solutions.

You will study areas such as

  • sustainable development;
  • environmental decision making;
  • environmental management and analysis; and
  • environmental law.

Engineering

Degree: Master of Engineering
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

The program covers key areas of professional electronics engineering systems design, delivery and management, including:

  • Very Large Scale Integration Algorithms and Systems
  • High Performance Integrated Circuit Design
  • Reconfigured Electronics
  • Telecommunications Performance Analysis
  • Hetrogeneous Networks, Theory and Practice

Linguistics

Degree: Master of Applied Linguistics
Duration: 1 – 2 years
Semester intakes: February and July

It is internationally relevant and focuses on the development of analytic skills and understanding the complex relationship between language use and context, and research in these areas. The degree is designed to allow candidates to study a broad range of topics within the area of Applied Linguistics. In particular, the degree has been designed to provide a strong theoretical and practical foundation in the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language.

Education

Degree: Bachelor of Education (Primary or Secondary)
Duration: 2 years full time
Semester intake: February

The Macquarie School of Education is committed to an academic, research-based approach to teacher education. At the core of Macquarie’s approach to teacher education is the concept of the scholar-teacher, one who is flexible, responsive to academic needs, reflective, open-minded, confident and adaptable.
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Do you have any questions about how you can apply for this Macquarie University scholarship? Email info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 to learn more!

Monday, December 15th, 2014

Macquarie museum holds ancient spell book and other magical mysteries

An Ancient Egyptian codex from Macquarie University’s Museum of Ancient Cultures has been deciphered for the first time, revealing an invocation including both Christian and Gnostic elements, ritual instructions, and a list of 27 spells to cure demonic possession, various ailments, the effects of magic, or to bring success in love and business.

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

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The new book translating this codex, A Coptic Handbook of Ritual Power, was edited by Associate Professor Malcolm Choat, Department of Ancient History  and Director, Macquarie Ancient Cultures Research Centre; and Professor Iain Gardner, Chair of the Department of Studies in Religion, University of Sydney.

“Magic is a subject of enduring interest, both to researchers and the general public,” said Choat. “Magic in the ancient world is the subject of a number of research projects in our department, and in 2016 we will be introducing a new unit on the history of magic.”

After a long invocation, the codex outlines 27 spells, or prescriptions, which offer healing or remedies for other problems people might have:

  • “Someone who is possessed: Say the formula on linseed oil and pitch. Anoint them.”
  • “Love charm: Say the formula on wine. Let them drink.”
  • “A binding (spell): Say the formula over a new potsherd (and) bury it at the door.”
  • “So that any person be subject to you and give glory to you: Say the formula first before you go out – within your house – and before you speak with the person.”
  • “When someone has a magic on them: wormwood, wine. Let him drink (it).”
  • “Black jaundice: Black cumin, pepper, wine; let him drink (it). Or if it is that of the gold (i.e. yellow jaundice): milky water, wormwood; and let them wash (in it) and drink (it). Boil the water.”
  • “For any sickness: Say the formula on a first (pressing) oil. Anoint them.”
  • “For every staunching of blood: Say the formula on a dry gourd. Let them eat (it). If it is in the body (i.e. internal bleeding): apply with vinegar.”

“You can see here how similar magic and medicine—things that we thinks of as quite separate spheres—actually were in antiquity. So as well as being part of the history of magic and religion, this is also part of the history of medicine,” said Choat.

The edition of this codex was carried out as part of a larger project to publish the over 600 papyri held in the Museum of Ancient Cultures, now known as the Macquarie Papyri.

“The type of Coptic used makes us think it might come from the region of el-Ashmunein (ancient Hermopolis) in Upper Egypt,” says Choat. “Coptic is the final stage of the Egyptian language, and descendent of the hieroglyphs. Based on the handwriting, we think the codex was written around 700 AD.”

Macquarie University is the only place in Australia where Coptic Studies is offered, and the university has been awarded more than three-quarters of a million dollars in Australian Research Council funding for projects in the area of Coptic Studies and papyrology over the last eight years.

Gardner is also teaching a Senior Level unit on ‘Ancient Egyptian Religion and Magic’ at the University of Sydney, and is currently participating in the 2012-2014 ARC Discovery project, “The function of images, and related aspects of production and design, in magical papyri and similar artifacts of ritual power from Late Antiquity,” led by Associate Professor Jay Johnston from the University of Sydney.

The Macquarie Papyri

The Museum of Ancient Cultures at Macquarie University, Sydney, holds a small, but important collection of some 640 papyri. These are mainly Greek texts. There are also some items written in other languages and scripts, notably Demotic and Coptic (Egyptian). Most are papyri in the strictest sense, but the collection also includes a small number of items written on ostraca, parchment, and wooden tablets. Most of the texts date from the period of the third century BC to the eighth century AD.

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Curious about studying Ancient History at Macquarie University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Arts Programs Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Macquarie researchers find wind patterns facilitated the Polynesian migration

New research shows that the expansion of the tropics and associated changes in Pacific Ocean wind patterns facilitated the Polynesian migration to the far eastern and southern ends of the Pacific including Easter Island, New Zealand and Subantarctic Auckland Islands.

Macquarie University’s Associate Professor Ian Goodwin of the Department of Environment and Geography and colleagues reconstructed wind-field patterns from modeled Pacific sea level pressure at 20-year intervals spanning the period 800 AD to 1600 AD.

Macquarie University

Macquarie researchers determine changes in Pacific Ocean wind patterns facilitated the Polynesian migration

Voyaging to Easter Island was possible as early as 800 to 910 AD, and voyaging to New Zealand as early as 940 to 970 AD. However, they revealed climate windows where the most favourable sailing conditions for travel between central East Polynesia and New Zealand occurred between 1140 and 1260 AD, and for travel to Easter Island between 1250 and 1280 AD.

The paleoclimate changes accords well with the archaeological evidence that suggests a rapid colonisation of Polynesian islands by sea-faring peoples, including the colonisation of New Zealand between 1100 and 1300 AD.

Off-wind or down-wind sailing between central East Polynesia and New Zealand was unusually possible during this period, when intensification and poleward expansion of the Pacific subtropical anticyclone strengthened tradewinds toward New Zealand.

The paleo-wind patterns revealed that New Zealand was potentially colonised by voyaging from the Tonga/Fiji Islands, the Southern Cook Islands, and the Austral Islands further east. Similarly, the wind patterns revealed that Easter Island might have been colonised from both Central East Polynesia and from Chile.

“This research fits in the Polynesian folklore, which refers to multiple migrations—our mapping of the climate conditions at that time they were travelling confirms the possibility,” said Macquarie University Professor Goodwin.

It also indicates that Polynesian sailing-canoes did not need a capability to sail to windward, and that all passages could have been made downwind over the immense ocean tracts.

“These are fantastic new insights into prehistoric maritime migration, and opens doors for marine climatologists to work with anthropologists and archaeologists, to piece together the evolution of maritime societies.”

About Anthropology

Anthropology is the comparative study of societies and cultural diversity. It asks interpretative questions about behaviour, meaning, and value between different societies and cultures. Why do people do what they do? Why do people in different societies do different things? Anthropologists generally obtain their understanding through participating in and observing the lives of the people they work among. Through this method, known as fieldwork, anthropologists gain a detailed knowledge of the cultural world of other peoples by living and working beside them.

Macquarie University Department of Environment and Geography

The department of Environment and Geography is committed to excellence in research, learning and teaching, and community engagement. In 2011, the Times Higher Education ranked Macquarie University the top institution in Australia and New Zealand for research in environmental sciences and ecology, and 14th in the world. More recently, environmental sciences was one of three disciplines at Macquarie to have again achieved the maximum rating (well above world standard) in the Australian Government’s 2012 Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) analysis.

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Learn more about studying anthropology or environmental sciences at Macquarie University and at other Australian universities! Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Monday, September 29th, 2014

Cate Blanchett receives honorary doctorate from Macquarie University

Actor Cate Blanchett has received a Doctor of Letters honoris causa from  Macquarie University, Sept. 25, recognising her extraordinary contribution to the arts, philanthropy and the community.

The award was presented to Blanchett in a morning graduation ceremony for the Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Human Sciences.

“It is a privilege to be addressed by one of the world’s greatest actors this graduation day,” said Vice-Chancellor, Professor S. Bruce Dowton.

Macquarie University Arts Degrees

Study at Macquarie University

“Many of the students graduating today will feel great affection for Cate Blanchett, having grown up watching her in some of the most iconic films of their childhood and adolescence, and benefitting from her many contributions to our national conversation.”

Born in Melbourne, Blanchett graduated from the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) in 1992. She appeared in several Sydney Theatre Company productions and Australian TV shows, before making her international film debut in 1997 with her role in Paradise Road.

In her career across stage and screen, Blanchett has received numerous film and theatre awards including two Academy Awards, three Baftas and three Golden Globe awards. She has also been awarded the Centenary Medal for Service to Australian Society through Acting, and the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister for Culture.  She served as Co-Artistic Director and CEO of the Sydney Theatre Company from 2008–2013, alongside Andrew Upton.

Blanchett’s stage roles include The Maids, Hedda Gabler, The Wars of the Roses, A Streetcar Named Desire, Uncle Vanya and Gross und Klein. In film, her work includes Blue Jasmine, Elizabeth, The Golden Age, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Aviator; I’m Not There, Notes on a Scandal, Robin Hood, Hanna, Veronica GuerinThe Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit.

Blanchett received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and in 2007 was named one of 100 Most Influential People by TIME Magazine.

A Patron of the Sydney Film Festival, Blanchett is also an Ambassador for the Australian Conservation Foundation and the Australian Film Institute. She holds honorary Doctor of Letters degrees from the University of NSW and the University of Sydney, and is the mother of three boys.

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

In the Faculty of Arts at  Macquarie University, students and staff work together within and across disciplinary boundaries to ask questions about socially complex problems, identify paths of research, analyze and communicate ideas in creative formats and reflect on the skills and knowledge they will need to understand the world, past and present.

Students are encouraged to use their skills and talents to connect with local and global communities. The faculty offers undergraduate and postgraduate coursework and research degree programs and is home to a number of internationally recognized research centres.

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Find out more about arts programs at Macquarie University and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Arts Programs Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information.

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Embalming study rewrites key chapter in Egyptian history

Researchers from the universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.

The scientific findings of an 11-year study by a researcher in the Department of Archaeology at York, and York’s BioArCh facility, and an Egyptologist from the Department of Ancient History at Macquarie University, push back the origins of a central and vital facet of ancient Egyptian culture by over a millennium.

Traditional theories on ancient Egyptian mummification suggest that in prehistory—the Late Neolithic and Predynastic periods between c. 4500 and 3100 B.C.—bodies were desiccated naturally through the action of the hot, dry desert sand.

Scientific evidence for the early use of resins in artificial mummification has, until now, been limited to isolated occurrences during the late Old Kingdom (c. 2200 B.C.). Their use became more apparent during the Middle Kingdom (c. 2000-1600 B.C.).

But the York, Macquarie and Oxford team identified the presence of complex embalming agents in linen wrappings from bodies in securely provenanced tombs in one of the earliest recorded ancient Egyptian cemeteries at Mostagedda, in the region of Upper Egypt.

“For over a decade I have been intrigued by early and cryptic reports of the methods of wrapping bodies at the Neolithic cemeteries at Badari and Mostagedda,” said Dr Jana Jones of Macquarie University, Sydney.

“In 2002, I examined samples of funerary textiles from these sites that had been sent to various museums in the United Kingdom through the 1930s from Egypt. Microscopic analysis with my colleague Mr Ron Oldfield revealed resins were likely to have been used, but I wasn’t able to confirm my theories, or their full significance, without tapping into my York colleague’s unique knowledge of ancient organic compounds.”

Dr Jones initiated the research and led the study jointly with Dr Stephen Buckley, a Research Fellow at the University of York.

“Such controversial inferences challenge traditional beliefs on the beginnings of mummification,” said Dr Jones. “They could only be proven conclusively through biochemical analysis, which Dr Buckley agreed to undertake after a number of aborted attempts by others. His knowledge includes many organic compounds present in an archaeological context, yet which are often not in the literature or mass spectra libraries.”

Corresponding author on the article, Dr Buckley, used a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and sequential thermal desorption/pyrolysis to identify a pine resin, an aromatic plant extract, a plant gum/sugar, a natural petroleum source, and a plant oil/animal fat in the funerary wrappings.

Predating the earliest scientific evidence by more than a millennium, these embalming agents constitute complex, processed recipes of the same natural products, in similar proportions, as those employed at the zenith of Pharaonic mummification some 3,000 years later.

Dr Buckley, who designed the experimental research and conducted the chemical analyses, said: “The antibacterial properties of some of these ingredients and the localised soft-tissue preservation that they would have afforded lead us to conclude that these represent the very beginnings of experimentation that would evolve into the mummification practice of the Pharaonic period.”

Dr Buckley added, “Having previously led research on embalming agents employed in mummification during Egypt’s Pharaonic period it was notable that the relative abundances of the constituents are typical of those used in mummification throughout much of ancient Egypt’s 3000 year Pharaonic history. Moreover, these resinous recipes applied to the prehistoric linen wrapped bodies contained antibacterial agents, used in the same proportions employed by the Egyptian embalmers when their skill was at its peak, some 2500-3000 years later.”

Professor Thomas Higham, who was responsible for dating the burials at the University of Oxford, said, “This work demonstrates the huge potential of material in museum collections to allow researchers to unearth new information about the archaeological past. Using modern scientific tools our work has helped to illuminate a key aspect of the early history of ancient Egypt.”

“Our ground-breaking results show just what can be achieved through interdisciplinary collaboration between the sciences and the humanities,” said Dr Jones.

Check out Macquarie’s video about studying Egyptology!

Department of Ancient History at Macquarie University

Whether you are looking for professional or further training, or just interested in extending your knowledge about the ancient world, Department of Ancient History at Macquarie offers a postgraduate program to suit your needs and interests. Entry into postgraduate programs requires prior study in the relevant discipline or a related filed.

Master of Ancient History

This program provides a concentrated study in Ancient History in several areas of special interest, e.g., archaeology, biblical studies, Greek and Roman history, and includes the opportunity for training in the use of documentary evidence for the study of the ancient world.

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Would you like to find out more about studying Ancient History at Macquarie University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Arts Programs Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

Macquarie Library and Art Gallery recognised with national awards

Macquarie University’s Library and Art Gallery have each received major recognition from peak industry bodies recently, highlighting their vibrant role in the broader community.

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

Macquarie University’s beautiful campus

The Macquarie University Library was announced as Australia’s favourite university library, in a public poll run by the Australian Library and Information Association.

Libraries were nominated and voted on by Australia’s public, with 223,768 votes submitted online, by phone, email and text message. The announcement on Australia’s Favourite Library officially launched Library and Information Week 2014.

“We’re thrilled to receive this accolade and we’re especially pleased that it has come from the votes of our library users,” said JoAnne Sparks, University Librarian. “We’ll continue to do everything we can to stay Australia’s favourite university library.”

Also over the week of May 19 -25, Museums Australia presented a MAGNA (Museums & Galleries National Award) to the Macquarie University Art Gallery for its current Affinities exhibition.

“The award was given in the category of exhibition (temporary), against some tough competitors, including the National Gallery of Australia, Australian War Memorial and Australian Museum,” says Rhonda Davis, Senior Curator.

“Affinities: 7 Museums, 50 objects” is one of a number of special displays in celebration of the university’s Golden Jubilee Year, open to the public in the University Art Gallery.

Affinities has seen the Macquarie University’s museums and collections join together to reveal their interdisciplinary relationships through their most exciting pieces—from mummies to microscopic samples.

Curating this multifaceted and eclectic display is a team of over 20 curators, researchers and academics, who are passionate about sharing the stories within the university for a broader audience.

“The exhibition not only unveils stories and insights into the tastes and values of cultures and societies, but also those that have shaped Macquarie University’s extraordinary collections since we were founded in 1964,” says Davis.

Included on public display for the first time is the Lewis Morley Library archive, a recent donation to the university.

During the launch of Affinities, Professor John Simons, Executive Dean of the Faculty of Arts also said, “Macquarie University is blessed with a range of collections reflecting the interests of its collegiate body and, in this Jubilee Year, it seemed appropriate to celebrate those assets, both physical and intellectual, with an exhibition that brought together objects from across the range of our holdings.”

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

In the Faculty of Arts at Macquarie University, students and staff work together within and across disciplinary boundaries to ask questions about socially complex problems, identify paths of research, analyze and communicate ideas in creative formats and reflect on the skills and knowledge they will need to understand the world, past and present.

  • Ancient History
  • Anthropology
  • English
  • Indigenous Studies – Warawara
  • International Studies
  • Law
  • Media, Music, Communications & Cultural Studies
  • Modern History, Politics & International Relations
  • Philosophy
  • Policing, Intelligence & Counter Terrorism
  • Sociology

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Are you interested in arts degrees at Macquarie University? Contact Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how OzTREKK can help you to study in Australia!

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Croatian Prime Minister visits Macquarie University

Macquarie University was pleased to welcome Croatian Prime Minister Mr Zoran Milanović to campus on Monday, March 10, as he recognized and offered ongoing support for the pioneering work of the only Croatian Studies centre in the Southern Hemisphere.

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

Study at Macquarie University (Photo credit Penny Clay)

Currently, Macquarie University teaches Croatian Studies to about 200 students, and since the unit’s inception 31 years ago, has had approximately 2,000 students.

Chancellor The Hon Michael Egan AO and Vice-Chancellor Professor S Bruce Dowton were joined by other members of the University Council and Executive, to receive Mr Zoran Milanović, his wife Mrs Sanja Musić Milanović, and the Minister of Defence Mr Ante Kotromanović.

Mr Zoran Milanović and his party of Croatian delegates were on site for the signing of a new agreement between the Republic of Croatia, the Croatian Studies Foundation, and the Macquarie, to continue support for teaching and research in Croatian Studies. As part of the agreement the Republic of Croatia will generously donate $150,000 per annum to Croatian Studies over the next five years, to the end of 2019.

Chancellor The Hon Michael Egan AO said the support received from the Republic, the Foundation, and the Croatian community is of very great importance, and affords fantastic opportunities for students.

“Later this year we will see a partnership between Croatian Studies and the university’s Department of Ancient History, which will take students and staff from Macquarie to undertake archaeological excavations in Dalmatia, to an area inhabited continuously since Neolithic times.

“The support of the Republic of Croatia, and the support of many people from the 120,000 strong Croatian community in Australia, together with the energy and ambition of staff from all across our Faculty of Arts, makes this tremendous opportunity possible.”

Vice-Chancellor Professor S Bruce Dowton says the association reflects Macquarie University’s continuing commitment to connect the university with the world.

“We are among the nation’s leading providers of education for international students with about a third of our students coming from overseas, and we have numerous international collaborations in learning and teaching as well as in research.”

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

In the Faculty of Arts at Macquarie, students and staff work together within and across disciplinary boundaries to ask questions about socially complex problems, identify paths of research, analyze and communicate ideas in creative formats and reflect on the skills and knowledge they will need to understand the world, past and present.

Students are encouraged to use their skills and talents to connect with local and global communities. The Faculty offers undergraduate and postgraduate coursework and research degree programs and is home to a number of internationally recognized research centres.

Department of International Studies

The Department of International Studies offers a Bachelor of International Studies as well as degree programs in various Asian and European languages. Research in the department is focused on the nexus between language and culture, e.g., historical and linguistic description of languages, and literary productions in specific languages and of individual writers and in the context of intercultural interactions. In addition research includes areas of Applied Linguistics, such as corpus-based approaches to language teaching and computer-mediated communication in second language acquisition, as well as language teaching methodology more generally.

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Find out more about arts programs at Macquarie University and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Arts Programs Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information.

Thursday, February 13th, 2014

Macquarie sport scholar at Sochi Winter Olympic Games

Macquarie University Sport Scholar and Bachelor of Arts student Lucy Glanville was selected to represent Australia at 22nd Winter Olympic Games held in Sochi, Russia.

Macquarie University

Study at Macquarie University

Competing in the women’s biathlon, Lucy’s selection has secured her place in sporting history as only the third female Australian to compete in this event at the Olympics since Nagano 1998.

In total, Australia is representing 10 of the 15 Olympic sports on offer of which, Glanville adds to a 60-strong Australian team comprising a record number of 28 university athletes.

While Lucy’s hard work and intensive training has finally secured her place in the world’s most prestigious sporting event, the biathlete’s Olympic campaign was not all smooth sailing in the lead-up to selection. In fact, despite achieving strong competition results at the recent Winter Universiade, Glanville’s spot on the Olympic team was tested when she was forced to eagerly await the decision for seven higher-placed countries to forego their athlete allocations—which luckily worked out in her favour.

Prior to this, Lucy’s thirst for international sporting excellence was recognized when she was nominated for the Female Athlete of the Year Award at the Macquarie University Blues Awards in 2013; an excellence also well acknowledged by Lucy’s personal support network – “this has been her best and most consistent shooting of the season so far,” said Lucy’s mum, Toni Hulme.

When asked about her goals for Sochi, Lucy humbly stated that she intends to race the best she can and gain experience for the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Preparations for the big event extended beyond the sporting arena. Ahead of Lucy’s Sochi representation, the talented athlete had begun learning Russian as part of her Bachelor of Arts at Macquarie University.

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

In the Faculty of Arts at Macquarie University, students and staff work together within and across disciplinary boundaries to ask questions about socially complex problems, identify paths of research, analyze and communicate ideas in creative formats and reflect on the skills and knowledge they will need to understand the world, past and present.

Faculty of Arts includes the following study areas:

  • Ancient History
  • Anthropology
  • English
  • Indigenous Studies – Warawara
  • International Studies
  • Law
  • Media, Music, Communications & Cultural Studies
  • Modern History, Politics & International Relations
  • Philosophy
  • Policing, Intelligence & Counter Terrorism
  • Sociology

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Find out more about arts programs at Macquarie University and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK to find out how we can help you to study in Australia!

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Macquarie University media professor appointed to National Museum Council

Arts Minister Tony Burke recently announced the appointment of Macquarie University’s Professor Catharine Lumby to the National Museum of Australia Council.

Mr Burke said the appointment of Professor Lumby for a three-year term would ensure the National Museum was well positioned to respond to new opportunities within the arts and cultural sector.

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

Learn more about Macquarie’s arts programs

“As an eminent author and public commentator, Professor Lumby brings significant strategic communications skills to the Council, and will be able to capitalize on opportunities provided by the National Broadband Network,” Mr Burke said, adding that the Macquarie professor also brings expertise in the history and contemporary focus of Australian news and current affairs, the representation of gender in the media, popular culture, and advertising and media ethics.

Lumby joined Macquarie University as a Professor of Media in 2013, after a successful career at the universities of Sydney and New South Wales. She is the author and co-author of six books and numerous journal articles and book chapters.

She is currently writing a literary biography of the author Frank Moorhouse. Since 2004, Catharine has worked in a pro-bono role advising the National Rugby League on cultural change and education programs for players. Before entering academia in 2000, she was a journalist and opinion writer and has worked for The Sydney Morning Herald, the ABC and The Bulletin magazine.

She has been the recipient of seven Australian Research Council grants and has completed research projects for organizations as diverse as Google Australia, the Australian Communication and Media Authority and the Australian Sports Commission.

Macquarie University Faculty of Arts

The Department of Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies (MMCCS) comprises a number of disciplines dedicated to understanding contemporary media, and to developing valuable practical skills.

The largest department within the Faculty of Arts, MMCCS offers both stand-alone degrees and majors within the Bachelor of Arts. Students have the flexibility to undertake units outside of their primary area in order to build a well-rounded, customized study program.

Macquarie University’s Department of Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies is also dedicated to research, in both its traditional incarnation and in the form of creative practice. It houses a vibrant research community bringing together Higher Degree research students and staff.

Popular graduate arts degrees at Macquarie University include

Master of Arts
Master of Applied Anthropology
Master of Creative Media
Master of International Communication
Master of International Communication with Master of International Relations
Master of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism (Specializations are available in Counter Terrorism, Intelligence, Policing, and Cyber-Security.)
Master of Politics and Public Policy

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Find out more about arts programs at Macquarie University and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK to find out how we can help you to study in Australia!