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Articles categorized as ‘University of Sydney Architecture School’

Friday, March 17th, 2017

Sydney Architecture students learn “real life” lessons from affordable housing project

The Indigenous community of Yarrabah in far north Queensland was the focus of architecture who were given the unique opportunity to work with community leaders on an affordable housing project.

Known as the Burri Gummin (‘one fire’) Affordable Housing Project, the students were contributing to an ongoing housing project led by a working party of Yarrabah Traditional Owners and local residents.

The project was facilitated by two Cairns-based, non-profit organisations: Worklink, an employment support group, and the Centre for Appropriate Technology, servicing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities living in remote areas of Australia.

Sixteen Master of Architecture students were invited onto Gunggandji country in far north Queensland to consult with community leaders on environmentally sustainable and culturally sensitive housing designs suited to the hot and humid tropics.

The University of Sydney’s Michael Mossman, one of the senior lecturers in the School of Architecture, Design and Planning driving the project, said, “The challenge was facilitating the student immersion and seeing how they would engage with Gunggandji country, the Yarrabah community, and the project brief. The students were overwhelmingly positive and have opened the door for future engagement with the Yarrabah community.”

Vince Schreiber, the King of Yarrabah and a representative of the working party on the Burri Gummin Affordable Housing Project commented on the student concepts: “They really took on some important information about what the land is all about, how we connect to country, and they really integrated it into the planning and the project itself.”

Vi Le, a recent graduate of Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney, was one of four alumni who worked on the project as a student mentor. She believes it was a unique opportunity as “the students had real clients, a real site that they visited and explored, and an actual community they had to respond to, all while tackling complex policy and cultural issues that usually get labelled ‘too difficult’ for a tertiary design project. The greatest challenge was having only two days in Yarrabah to learn from the community and observe the changing weather of a tropical climate.”

Vi Le believes that the students learned how crucial it is to engage with the local community. “Working with specific people with specific needs and expectations made the project very real for the students and gave them a real sense of social justice and responsibility.

Sydney Architecture students learn

Learn more about studying architecture at the University of Sydney

“The architecture profession needs to self-reflect on what it really means to be an architect in an age of climate change, social injustices, in the absence of political will and leadership. We cannot simply rely on drawings of buildings that do not address the wider issues or are illegible to most people outside of our profession,” she said.

Michael Mossman, who has historical connections to Gunggandji country, added, “The experience was special for me, as it provided a chance to work with a community where I have strong historical links and gave me the opportunity to reconnect to place. The community was wonderful in welcoming staff and students onto country and sharing valuable knowledge, which we accepted with great privilege.”

The project is the subject of a new exhibition “Venice | Yarrabah Lines of Enquiry” that officially opened on March 9. It features drawings of the students’ housing concepts and video used to present their design ideas to the Yarrabah community.

The Yarrabah housing project is displayed alongside architectural models exhibited at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale by another group of Master of Architecture students.

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Discover more about studying architecture at Sydney Uni! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information about your study options.

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

Inspired student visions for Sydney architecture

University of Sydney students unveiled their big architectural visions for a series of landmark cultural buildings and public spaces in Sydney and regional NSW in a final graduate exhibition that opened on Nov. 24.

It is recognised as one of the most influential student architecture shows of the year, drawing thousands of visitors on opening night. The annual showcase reveals the bold and intelligent ideas of a new generation of architects.

Inspired student visions for Sydney architecture

Master of Architecture student Dong Ho Lee’s vision for a Town Hall public library that acts as an extension of the future pedestrianised George Street, to improve the experiential quality of Town Hall by introducing an internal public space. (Image: University of Sydney)

Elizabeth Carpenter, an alumna of the University of Sydney and Managing Principal of fjmt, said “We are inspired by the ideas emerging from the new generation. These ideas are our future. For the ongoing viability of the profession, recent graduates are vital in maintaining our relevance in a rapidly changing world.”

The work on display comes from eight graduation studios, where Sydney Architecture students spent four months creating their design and model in their final year of study. Each studio gives students a fictitious brief to develop designs for landmark Sydney cultural institutions and public spaces, as well as regional community projects that reflect on an Australian identity.

“The synthesis of research and design excellence cultivated by our staff and students fundamentally re-envisages what architecture is, tackling the complex challenges of contemporary life with intelligence and vision,” said Dr Sandra Löschke, Director of the Masters architecture program at the University of Sydney.

A show highlight is 150 exquisite architectural models that capture the design skill that students have mastered during their studies, supported by the unrivalled modelling and fabrication workshops in the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning.

“The exhibition’s ‘model highways’ quite literally transport these visionary ideas into mainstream culture and allow us to make a fundamental difference,” added Dr Löschke.

Master of Architecture students present unique designs for a Sydney square at Town Hall, an Observatory and Planetarium at South Head, a museum for the Australian Institute of Architects incorporating the historic Tusculum building, and a cultural institution on the site of The Goods Line behind the ABC, now the new Ultimo Pedestrian Network. Travelling west to Wiradjuri country, another group envisages a series of cultural and community buildings lining the main street of Dubbo.

Inspired by the work of Jørn Utzon, Bachelor of Design in Architecture students provide innovative designs and models for a monumental performance space to fill the void behind the Sydney Mint on the edge of the Domain.

“Each piece of work speaks eloquently of the commitment, vision and just plain hard work of our students, tutors and staff,” said Michael Muir, Senior Lecturer and Director of the Design in Architecture undergraduate program.

University of Sydney Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Degrees

Master of Architectural Science (several streams to choose from)
Master of Architecture
Master of Heritage Conservation
Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts
Master of Urban Design (Architectural & Urban Design)
Master of Urban and Regional Planning
Master of Urbanism (several majors to choose from)

Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney

The University of Sydney is currently ranked #1 in Australia for architecture according to the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016.

Degree: Master of Architecture
Location: Darlington Campus, Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March and July each year
Application deadline: January 30 and June 29; however, it is recommended that candidates apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to the University of Sydney Architecture School!

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Would you like more information about becoming a Sydney Architecture student? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Robot art, architecture and design in live lab

Robots that mimic human hand gestures, do life drawings, and print intricate 2D and 3D clay shapes and structures form a pop-up lab in the new exhibition, Robots in Architecture 2016 – Developing the Future, at the University of Sydney’s Tin Sheds Gallery.

Four KUKA and ABB industrial robots demonstrate novel design and production techniques that may be used to break new ground in design and fabrication in the architecture and construction industries in the future.

University of Sydney Architecture School

Robotic live lab, Code to Production, in Tin Sheds Gallery at Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, University of Sydney. (Photo credit: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt)

The University of Sydney’s Dr Dagmar Reinhardt, Chair of the recent ROB|ARCH2016 global conference, and Program Director in the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, said, “Beyond setting protocols and automation processes for fabrication, we are expanding the possibilities of human-machine interactions for collaboration in industry. This has the real potential to lift productivity and economic growth for the building industries.”

The robotic live lab, Code To Production, is part of a larger exhibition showcasing robot-driven designs and processes that were seen at the ROB|ARCH2016 Robots in Architecture conference in Sydney, and produced by DMaF Architecture Robotics Lab at the University of Sydney.

A research-led design elective that is part of architectural studies at the university, the lab introduces undergraduate and postgraduate students to robotic 2D and 3D processes that are explored in the Tin Sheds exhibition every Thursday over the next three weeks.

“They are testing design ideas and methods developed at the interactive 3D printing workshop that we ran with IACC Barcelona and Harvard University at ROB|ARCH2016 in March,” said Dr Reinhardt.

“Developing skills sets that adopt traditional craftsmanship for current state-of-the-art technologies such as robotic fabrication, plays an important role for researchers, practice and industry.

“Exposing these processes to our students allows us to shape future generations of architects and increase Australia’s competitiveness in architecture and creative robotics,” she said.

The use of robotic fabrication in architecture and construction has grown rapidly over the last 15 years, and continues to accelerate as the potential for innovation and creativity using robots is harnessed by the creative industries.

Interviews with 37 leading robotic researchers at ROB|ARCH2016 talking about their current research, the potential impact on industry, and the 10-year outlook also feature in the exhibition. Footage of robots in action at eight conference workshops, and a sample of prototypes, installations and material tests produced by the robots, is also displayed.

Every two years the ROB|ARCH Robots in Architecture, Art and Design conference sees the largest gathering of robotics researchers in architecture and design from around the world. The Sydney conference drew over 250 academics, practitioners and industry researchers in robotic fabrication from 10 countries including Australia, USA, China, Korea, Switzerland, Denmark, Netherlands, Austria, Portugal and Spain.

ROB|ARCH2016 was hosted by the University of Sydney Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning alongside partnering Australian universities: The University of NSW, Bond University, RMIT, University of Technology Sydney, and Monash University in conjunction with the Association for Robots in Architecture and several international university and industry collaborators.

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Learn more about studying architecture at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at 1-866-698-7355 or shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Sydney Opera House project assisted by University of Sydney researchers

Sydney’s iconic Opera House has embarked on a concrete conservation project that will keep the grand diva of construction looking its best for future artists, audiences and visitors.

The Sydney Opera House in conjunction with researchers from the University of Sydney have spent the past 18 months researching and cataloging an inventory of renovation and restoration needs for the World Heritage-listed site.

University of Sydney Architecture School

The famous Sydney Opera House

The project forms part of the Getty Foundation’s Keeping It Modern initiative, dedicated to the conservation of significant 20th century architecture around the world.

“The Opera House is one of the world’s most recognisable concrete buildings. With its unique sculptural form, the building is known for its innovative use of structural concrete as an architectural element,” says Sydney Opera House Building Director Greg McTaggart.

“As we renew the building for the next generation we are currently reviewing and updating our asset management approach. The team’s research results will be integrated into the Opera House’s long-term conservation management plan and will be easily accessible to building managers and staff involved in the day-to-day maintenance of the building.”

Professor Gianluca Ranzi from the University of Sydney School of Civil Engineering said, “Concrete is a highly versatile material that has been used since the Roman Empire.

“In the last century it enjoyed a renaissance and, since then, has been used as primary material in many modern-day constructions, including the Opera House designed by Jørn Utzon and completed in 1973.

“Academics and students from the disciplines of civil engineering, chemical engineering, architectural science and heritage conservation have been involved in this project by undertaking specialised students’ projects.

“They have been contributing to various aspects ranging from the analysis of past and current concrete condition assessment reports to the development of the structural assessment framework for the Opera House within the context of concrete conservation principles, addressing the needs of historic twentieth-century concrete buildings.

“This has been an extraordinary experience for our students who have been able to be exposed to one of world’s most attractive concrete structures, and it has been a pleasure to see them engaged with this project,” says Professor Ranzi.

Master of Architecture

The Master of Architecture degree operates around a series of studios that require students to engage at a graduate level with projects with an emphasis on research, design and vision. Student work is defined by the rigours of industry practice and surveys the social, environmental, practical and aesthetic needs of the brief while working within the larger context of architectural theory and philosophy. The University of Sydney is currently ranked #1 in Australia for architecture according to the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016.

Degree: Master of Architecture
Location: Darlington Campus, Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March and July
Application deadline: January 30 and June 29; however, it is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to the University of Sydney Architecture School!

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Would you like more information about studying architecture at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, January 25th, 2016

Sydney architecture students give street vendor shelter a design makeover

The humble street vendor cart and shelter that lines the streets of many Asian cities and is a key driver of local economies will get a design makeover by Australian and Indonesian architecture students this month.

A group of students from the University of Sydney Architecture School and Bandung Institute of Technology (Institut Teknologi Bandung – ITB) in Indonesia are taking part in a two-week international exchange to redesign the imposing structures that are widely found on the streets of Indonesia.

University of Sydney Architecture School

Architecture students from the University of Sydney and Bandung Institute of Technology finalise their design concept Bunga Bandung (translation: flower). Photo: Sarah Rhodes via University of Sydney

Indonesian native Dr Rizal Muslimin, one of the organisers of the exchange who lectures in architecture at the University of Sydney said, “While street vendors provide goods and services to the local community, their temporary carts and shelters often become permanent fixtures that cause major congestion and cleanliness problems. Yet street vendors are a vibrant part of the local culture and an important driver of local business,” said Dr Muslimin.

Eight architecture students from Indonesia are spending one week in Sydney working with six students from the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning. The group are using the university’s advanced digital fabrication labs to develop prototype designs for a deployable, lightweight shelter.

“Students are asked to come up with portable, low-cost structure that is quick and simple to erect and dismantle. They must also consider materials that are widely available in Indonesia, which they will use to build their structure,” said Dr Muslimin.

After developing the designs in Sydney, the student group will return to Bandung in Indonesia to spend a week building their prototypes and test driving the new shelters on the streets of Indonesia.

“The students will be involved in seeing if their design holds up in the local environment and getting feedback from local vendors on whether it meets their needs.

“They will also gain a greater understanding of the informal street economy, which is the livelihood of many people in developing countries,” he said.

Muslimin believes that the prototype shelters may also have the potential for use in local community markets in Australia.

“The needs of stallholders in Australia’s own community markets are not dissimilar to the Indonesians. They both need something that is easy to transport and set up and pull down in a short space of time,” said Dr Muslimin.

The travelling studio is supported by the Commonwealth through the Australia-Indonesia Institute of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia.

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Learn more about studying architecture at the University of Sydney Architecture School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

Industry scouts for digital disrupters at graduate show

A growing number of major Australian corporates are supporting the University of Sydney’s annual Design Lab graduate show to find and nurture the brightest emerging talent for the new era of digital disruption.

Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC), Commonwealth Bank, Deloitte Digital, and IBM have joined several long-standing UX* industry supporters to sponsor this year’s show, Anthelion, which opens at the University of Sydney’s Tin Sheds Gallery on Nov. 26.

Sydney Architecture School

The exhibition is the final showcase of work by students completing a Bachelor of Design Computing and Master of Interaction Design & Electronic Arts (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The exhibition is the final showcase of work by students completing a Bachelor of Design Computing and Master of Interaction Design & Electronic Arts. The show represents the intersection of two worlds: design and technology—an essential skillset in today’s thriving UX industry that is driving digital innovation.

Associate Professor Martin Tomitsch, Head of Design Lab and Director of Design Computing at the University of Sydney says that the graduating students are in high demand from industry every year.

“Our students have the design thinking and technical skills that can reshape the way we interact with our physical, social and cultural environment.

“The works in the show represent the varied ways our students approach and respond to designing and creating meaningful and user-friendly experiences at home, on the street, in the workplace and virtually,” said Tomitsch.

PwC’s Dr Crighton Nichols leads the innovation team in PwC’s internal core technologies group. He believes that the Design Computing and MIDEA graduates are very well equipped to contribute to today’s digital world, in which user-experience is critical.

”Digital disruption is transforming the way PwC works with our clients. Our engagements are more collaborative and informed by data, often from multiple sources that need to be consolidated. The resulting insights then need to be communicated clearly, which requires creative data visualisation to be truly effective.

“The ability to take a design-thinking approach to working with clients to understand the problem space and then iterate through possible solutions using lean, agile methodologies is essential to achieving our vision to solve complex problems that are important to society”, said Dr Crighton Nichols, Innovator & Enterprise Architect, PwC.

Disruptive thinker and University of Sydney graduate, Victoria Adams, is a UX designer in the innovation team at PwC, who was literally recruited on the spot by Nichols at last year’s show.

“I met Crighton at the design computing showcase through one of the lecturers, and started talking UX, design and innovation. Shortly after giving him my website, I was in the interview room—a few times—and a year later, I am ten months into my job at PwC!” said Adams.

This year’s Anthelion show sees 57 students present new ideas and design challenges across robotics and drones, mobile apps, 3D modelling, interactive digital installations, and wearable technology.

Among some of the unique ideas on show are Waterbender, a smart home app to track and control water usage; Home Command, an app for automated home devices controlling lighting, doors and alarms; You’re the Superhero, a fun interactive installation for children in hospital to assist with their recovery; and KneeTech, a wearable device that monitors patient progress after Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstructive surgery.

“Some works are experimental ideas for now, but may become central to how we experience the world and live our lives in the future. The exhibition provides a place for industry to meet and see the many and varied imaginings of our students,” said Tomitsch.

An Athelion is a term used in astronomy to describe a rare optical phenomenon that appears in the form of a white halo occurring at the intersection of anthelic arcs. The title for the exhibition emerged as a metaphor for the way the University of Sydney graduates and their skills are situated at the intersection of design and technology.

*user-experience

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Would you like more information about studying at the University of Sydney Architecture School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

A day in the life of women in architecture

Parlour Inc, a fast-growing, not-for-profit organisation that promotes gender equity in the architecture industry, will hold its first Sydney event at the University of Sydney next month.

The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning’s Tin Sheds Gallery will stage a photographic exhibition by Parlour, which captures women architects and the architectural workplaces of three major Sydney practices over a single day. A second series of images playfully reveals the demographic makeup of the architectural community and challenges typecasts of an architect’s identity.

University of Sydney Architecture School

Study architecture and design at the University of Sydney

For more than two decades now, the proportion of female students graduating in architecture has been over 40%*. Yet women represent only 21%* of registered architects, suggesting that greater industry support for women architects is long overdue.

The University of Sydney‘s Associate Professor Lee Stickells said, “We see many talented female graduates coming out of our faculty. While I also see many of our alumni enjoying continued success, career pathways for women architects could be substantially improved. So this is an important initiative to support University of Sydney graduates and the industry for the long term.”

Parlour developed from the ARC-funded research project Equity and Diversity in the Australian Architecture Profession: Women, Work and Leadership (2011–2014), led by University of Queensland‘s Dr Naomi Stead, to investigate the low number of women progressing through the industry.

“Following our research, we saw the need to provide a space for women to speak, network and celebrate their work in architecture. We need to encourage all those working in the profession to exchange experiences and share constructive ideas for best work practices. This will support women coming through the industry, as well as make it a better work experience for men in architecture,” said Dr Naomi Stead.

Parlour co-founder and editor, Justine Clark, says that they have created strong online networks across Australia and internationally and are now delighted to be holding their first Sydney event.

“There is a thriving, online community of activists who are working towards greater equity for women in the Australian architecture profession. The exhibition is an important contribution to this, and provides a different view of the research that will help develop networks in Sydney.”

The photographic exhibition Portraits of Practice: At Work in Architecture features around 300 images of women in the Sydney offices of Bates Smart, BVN Architecture and PTW Architects.

“It creates an interesting picture of women at work in architecture, working to increase their visibility, celebrate their achievements, and shift industry thinking to greater support of career pathways for women in practice,” said Justine Clark.

Naomi Stead added “It gives visitors, including future architects, a better sense of what architectural work entails and offers a more realistic portrait of everyday life in an architectural office. It also shows positive female role models in the industry today.”

The exhibition includes a second series of photographs that captured almost 100 delegates at the 2010 national conference of the Australian Institute of Architects. The series shows that practitioners are more diverse than the popular perception of a male-dominated industry, challenging stereotypes and clichés about who can be an architect.

Portraits of Practice: At Work in Architecture opens at Tin Sheds Gallery at the University of Sydney on July 10 and runs until September 11. A series of talks and forums will be held during the exhibition’s Sydney show. Visit http://archiparlour.org/ for further event information.

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Find out more about the Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney Architecture School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 to find out how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

University of Sydney architecture and engineering developing new microtimber

Macadamia shells are already used as a biofuel. Australian researchers are now proposing to use the nut’s extraordinary properties as a basic element in a new microtimber, made using pioneering 3D-printing technology. Until now, this technology has been primarily used for small-scale, industrial design products.

University of Sydney Architecture School

Study architecture and design at the University of Sydney

A research team led by University of Sydney architecture and engineering experts has received funding to investigate ways to 3D-print a new gradient timber panel using forestry waste and by-products, including the discarded shells of the popular Australian bush nut.

The three-year study, partially funded by the Forestry and Wood Products Association, aims to break new ground in the use of agricultural waste and 3D printing, which has the potential to revolutionise Australia’s building industry.

Dr Sandra Löschke, Director of Architecture, Design and Technology and co-leader of the research team, says that the innovative work lies in the micro-layering and fusing of different 3D-printed timber compositions, to provide a unique material and geometric gradient suitable for large-scale building projects.

“We want to create innovative, environmentally resilient panels that are customised to react optimally to structural stress and weather exposure of a building. We aim to not only provide sustainable but aesthetic alternatives to standard timber products.

“The aim is to establish scientifically informed design principles for materially graded elements, which will help industry meet cutting-edge demands in construction in the future. This will be made possible by bringing together a team of multi-disciplinary experts from across the university,” said Dr Löschke.

The project will advance previous research into 3D printing techniques by co-leader Professor Andy Dong, Warren Centre Chair for Engineering Innovation at the University of Sydney.

“Timber is an important primary industry for Australia. Architectural and structural design aspirations are driving innovations in new value-added timber products, including the conversion of so-called waste material into a bespoke product.

“The anticipated outcomes of the research are highly significant for the forestry industry. It could fundamentally change the way Australia produces timber-based products,” said Professor Dong.

Researchers will experiment and test different material compositions using timber flours, including hardwood, softwood and macadamia shells.

The team will produce prototypes for a sustainable and highly marketable microtimber, which may be adapted for a wide range of building features such as walls, cladding, internal screens or louvres. As part of the research, the team plans to design and fabricate a demonstration prototype that showcases the benefits and potential of the new microtimber.

The project is the first stage of a long-term research initiative by the University of Sydney exploring new design principles, material and production processes using cutting-edge fabrication technologies, which will deliver sustainable, alternative products for the Australian building industry.

University of Sydney Architecture School

The Master of Architecture degree operates around a series of studios that require students to engage at a graduate level with projects with an emphasis on research, design and vision. Student work is defined by the rigours of industry practice and surveys the social, environmental, practical and aesthetic needs of the brief while working within the larger context of architectural theory and philosophy. You will develop expertise across design, technology and theory which will form the basis of your approach and response to architectural projects and practice. There is one studio per semester as follows:

  • Urban Architecture
  • Sustainable Architecture
  • Digital Architecture
  • Graduation Studio

Degree: Master of Architecture
Location: Darlington Campus, Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March and July
Application deadline: January 31 and June 30; however, it is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to the University of Sydney Architecture School!

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Would you like more information about studying architecture at the University of Sydney Architecture School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney

The Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney builds on the skills acquired in your undergraduate degree and prepares you for registration as an architect. This degree produces graduates who are forward thinking, adaptable and at the forefront of the changing trends of the architecture industry. You will be challenged to expand your conceptual and creative skills while being grounded in the professional requirements essential for practice after graduation.

University of Sydney Architecture School

Learn more about Sydney Architecture School

This degree operates around a series of studios that require students to engage at a graduate level with projects with an emphasis on research, design and vision. Student work is defined by the rigours of industry practice and surveys the social, environmental, practical and aesthetic needs of the brief while working within the larger context of architectural theory and philosophy. You will develop expertise across design, technology and theory which will form the basis of your approach and response to architectural projects and practice. There is one studio per semester as follows:

  • Urban Architecture
  • Sustainable Architecture
  • Digital Architecture
  • Graduation Studio

The first three studios lead to the Graduation Studio in the final semester of study which is a based around a largely self-driven project. Students also undertake subjects that explore the historical, technological and theoretical aspects of architecture and investigate the critical issues facing contemporary architectural design.

The Master of Architecture is a 2-year full-time program taught by some of the world leaders in architecture education and on graduation. Students will join distinguished alumni who have gone on to become major figures in the architecture world both in Australia and internationally. You will have a dedicated Master of Architecture studio space which you may access 24 hours a day. Students also have access to 24 hour computer labs, the latest digital fabrication equipment, wood and metal workshops as well as a number of art studios. There is also opportunities for international exchange in the first three semesters of the program with a number of prestigious institutions worldwide.

Degree: Master of Architecture
Location: Darlington Campus, Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March and July
Application deadline: January 31 and June 30; however, it is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Apply to the University of Sydney Architecture School!

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Learn more about the Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney Architecture School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Architecture Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 to find out how you can study in Australia!